Learning the Skeletal System

Posted
by soingal soingal Member

hello, everyone!

i am in the process of entering college this may for my pre-requisite courses (bsn program). i have completed a diploma medical assisting program (another topic).

in nursing school, do most a&p classes require a student to know all of the bones of the skeletal system or just the major ones? i have an "introductory" a&p book entitled the human body in health & disease by thibodeau/patton which seems like a good book, but i will more than likely have a different (possibly more thorough) a&p book when i get into this particular class.

i wanted to get a head start on studying the skeletal system and want to be well prepared.

btw, i'm a 41 y/o mother of 3 children who has had aspirations of working in healthcare for a few years now. the university i'm planning on attending is iupu in columbus, in (they also have campuses in indy and bloomington).

thanks in advance!

hoosier

NJCheyla

NJCheyla

191 Posts

My prof did not require us to learn every bone but I have heard there are some that do. I think it would be a good idea to start learning the major players. Go to anatomyarcade.com and get busy on Whack-A-Bone. It's a really fun way to learn many of the bones. Good luck!

-NJ

Saysfaa

Saysfaa

905 Posts

My class required all of them. The top two vertebrae individually the rest by catagory (cervical, thoracic, etc.). And the ribs were "ribs" not which rib. And we didn't have to know the wrist, hand, ankle and foot bones disconnected from any other as we did the rest of the bones; we did have to know each of them (wrist, etc) while it was attached to the others.

stefanyjoy

stefanyjoy

252 Posts

for A&P I, we did not have to learn the names of the carpals and tarsal bones, but most of the other ones. It actually really isn't that much. I'm much more worried about muscles and the nervous system.

stefanyjoy

stefanyjoy

252 Posts

forgive any spelling errors (I'm sure there are many), but this is what I had to learn:

cranial and facial bones: frontal, parietal, occipital, temporal, sphenoid, ethmoid, lacrimal, maxillae, mandible, zygomatic process, and the different sutures, different features of skull such as mastoid process, jugular foramen, foramen magnum, etc.

cervical vertabrae: C1 (atlas), C2 (axis), C3-C7, thoracic vertabrae T1-T12, lumbar vertabrae L1-L5, saccrum, coccyx

pectoral girdle: scapula & clavicle, responsible for processes on scapula such as acromion, etc

pelvic girdle: coxal bones, identifying parts of the hip bone

humorus, ulna, radius, carpals, metacarpals, phalanges

femur, tibia, fibula

tarsals, metatarsals, phalanges

then all the different types of joints, features of synovial cavities, etc.

I think professors prefer a different variety of each process or depressions of bones, but certainly you won't need to know them all for A&P I (unless you have some really tough professor!)

NJCheyla

NJCheyla

191 Posts

for A&P I, we did not have to learn the names of the carpals and tarsal bones, but most of the other ones. It actually really isn't that much. I'm much more worried about muscles and the nervous system.

the muscular system is the one I really struggled with b/c the names are so foreign in some cases such as sartorius and gastrocnemius. And those dreaded forearm muscles! :down:

-NJ

Taylo040

Taylo040

Has 1 years experience. 78 Posts

Being a Mother or two I too know the importance of trying to start early and twice as hard! I loved the site www.getbodysmart.com it was a great visual online tool and it also has quizes that you can take as well. Good luck with your veture, hope this site helps!

:D

soingal

soingal

53 Posts

Thanks for the responses! While in medical assisting school, I thought the nervous system was overwhelming, for starters! Granted, I could've/should've applied myself more, got a decent final grade, but I'm really on a mission this time around. LOL

olivia60

olivia60

Specializes in Inpatient & family practice. Has 8 years experience. 45 Posts

My A&P instructor told me I didn't have the right stuff to be an RN. He gave us an all fill in the blanks test on all the bones in the skeletal system only 6 week into the class. Blew my aspirations for becoming a nurse right down the tubes. Now I am not sure I even want to continue my education in another field. Any advice.

olivia60

olivia60

Specializes in Inpatient & family practice. Has 8 years experience. 45 Posts

P.S. I really think he was weeding out what he considered to be unsuitable candidates for his A&P class. I guess I need to know if it is up to an instructor to determine how suitable you are?

Taylo040

Taylo040

Has 1 years experience. 78 Posts

olivia60, just because an A/P instructor told you he/she "thought" you do not have the right stuff does not mean that you cannot successfully complete nursing. Have you tried volunteering at a local hospital? Volunteering is a great way to get exposure of what it is like in hospital and working with patients. The pre-req's are difficult, but it is not a good measurement of whether or not you will be a good nurse or successfully become one. It is a lot of hard work, but if you have the drive and passion, anyone can do it! Good Luck!

Tashired

Tashired

15 Posts

Dont give up an prove him wrong!