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labeled job hopper and can't get past it

Hi everyone,

I graduated from nursing school almost 2 years ago now. I have had 3 Nursing Jobs since then. My first job lasted 3.5 months in the ICU setting. My second job lasted 2 months on adult gen med floor. My most recent job lasted about 3.5 months on pediatric unit. In each of my previous jobs I have not been able to make it past orientation. I liked the jobs but at the end of orientation the managers decided I was not where I needed to be and I should look elsewhere for work (I also agreed). The two hospitals I worked at were quite big and I feel that although this was good in some ways it also may have made things more difficult for me. I have been told a smaller facility might be better which I have been looking into. At this point I have been trying to look for a job for 3 months now. I cannot seem to find work. It seems to be because of my nursing history. I always get asked what happened at my previous jobs and why this job would be any different. I have not been able to convince anyone that despite my history I want to stay somewhere for a while and I believe I can do it at this particular job. I am wondering if this means that maybe I shouldn't be a nurse. I have tried to look for jobs outside hospitals but it is difficult since I have very little nursing experience. I don't know what to do now. I want to be a nurse but maybe I am not able. I don't want to give up but I am running out of steam. I also have been using my savings to pay the rent recently so I need a job soon. Any advice would be appreciated. Help please.:cry:

st4wb3rr33sh0rtc4k3

Specializes in Tele/ICU/MedSurg/Peds/SubAcute/LTC/Alz.

I win! LOL, I have had lots of jobs after I graduated.

Lets see. I was a Graduate Nurse in LDRP.

I was a Staff RN for one year and 6 months in a LTC/Alzheimer's/Sub-Acute Facility.

I left there to get my Med/Surg experience in a hospital, but was laid off because of low patient census, and they could not place me in a specialty with my experience. They just weren't into training me.

I worked for a LTC place it ended up being hostile, so I quit. Didn't want to have to go through an investigation blah, blah, blah...

Worked for an agency in LTC, for a couple of months. Wasn't getting many hours and the mortgage needed to be paid.

Put the house on the market. Then, I left Massachusetts and did a Med/Surg travel assignment in New Mexico for 13 weeks. Did not extend.

Now, I am in Med/Surg at a local hospital, close to where I live, in Arizona. Hate it, wool pulled over the eyes once again. I am definately looking.

So don't worry, I have definately been there, and can relate. :lol2:

Can I help by giving you my recruiters number? Let me know maybe he can help. :D Just send me a PM.

traumaRUs, MSN, APRN, CNS

Specializes in Nephrology, Cardiology, ER, ICU.

Okay - so you have had three jobs in less than 2 years. Yes, this is an obstacle - however, it can be overcome. You need to take steps that will reassure a new employer that you have learned why these positions didn't work out. Was it because of the pt load, the pace, the hourse, shift, overwhelmed with new learning experiences? So...you need to do some self-reflection about why these situations didn't work out and what you can do to correct the issues you encountered. Here is some sound advice:

"Employers might be leery of hiring candidates with a history of job-hopping due to recruiting and training expenses. Use your cover letter to explain your work history and put a positive spin on your circumstances. Also, indicate your interest in a long-term position."

http://career-advice.monster.com/resume-writing-basics/Resume-Dilemma-Employment-Gaps-and-/home.aspx

ukstudent

Specializes in SICU.

In just under 2 years you have had 3 jobs lasting a total of 9 months and have not managed to make it out of orientation yet! If I was hiring for a hospital I would be leary of you as well.

That said, you need a job and to stay in it for a while. Try LTC, they might be willing to give you a try as they don't have a long expensive orientation. It's hard work and you would need to stay for at least 6 months, a year would be better, even if this is an area of nursing that you were not looking at.

TheCommuter, BSN, RN

Specializes in Case mgmt., rehab, (CRRN), LTC & psych.

I agree with the previous poster who suggested that you look at local nursing homes and LTCFs for work. In my area, nursing homes are so desperate for staff that they don't check references or work histories carefully. In other words, hiring managers at nursing homes might hire you while purposely overlooking the fact that your nursing work history is checkered with the job-hopping issue. Good luck to you!

I actually interviewed at a long term care facility today but from what I saw I don't think I would be able to do it. The patient to nurse ratio is at best 12:1 with the sicker patients and in most cases 18:1. It is hard for me to imagine how anyone can take care of that many patients even with the help of a care assistant.

TheCommuter, BSN, RN

Specializes in Case mgmt., rehab, (CRRN), LTC & psych.

I actually interviewed at a long term care facility today but from what I saw I don't think I would be able to do it. The patient to nurse ratio is at best 12:1 with the sicker patients and in most cases 18:1. It is hard for me to imagine how anyone can take care of that many patients even with the help of a care assistant.
You'll never know until you try. If you say, "I can't do it, " you're essentially giving up on the prospect already.

I work at a nursing home and care for 25 residents daily. Once you get to know the little old people, it's a piece of cake.

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