Jump to content

Is 2 years of prerequisites worth it?

Posted
jezziejpg jezziejpg (New) New Pre-Student

Hey! I’m actually still a junior in high school but really want to become an RN (specifically working in the NICU). I’ve been doing a college search, and so far all of them require 2 years of prerequisites which are offered through a Health Sciences A.A degree. To me it sounds like a waste of time and money, but is this the track most current nurses chose? There are some colleges that offer these prerequisites in the program so I don’t have to complete another degree for no reason but they are expensive, too far for me, or poorly rated.

If you get a bachelors in nursing usually you’ll have two years of pre reqs and two years of actual nursing classes.

If you’re a junior in high school and don’t want it to take as long you can go to your local community college and register for a few of those pre reqs and get it out the way. This is what I did during my junior year of high school. It allowed me to graduate with my first degree in biology in three years instead of four. And that way you can save money my taking the classes at your CC and transferring the credits in to your nursing program.

Edited by Bobognnp

2 minutes ago, Bobognnp said:

If you get a bachelors in nursing usually you’ll have two years of pre reqs and two years of actual nursing classes.

I wanted to go into an ADN program, then BSN later on.

Usually it doesn’t take two years for pre reqs at a ADN. Cuz that’s how long it would take you to complete the nursing degree. But they still make you take those pre reqs before you can apply or get into the program.

Casey_93, ASN

Specializes in ICU/Critical Care. Has 2 years experience.

19 hours ago, jezziejpg said:

I wanted to go into an ADN program, then BSN later on.

Speaking as an ASN/ADN grad, it's worth it. I'm planning on going back to school ASAP to earn my BSN, and I still need at least 8 more classes, with most bridge programs I'm eyeing requiring up to 10-12.

Most ASN/ADN courses will require a minimum amount of pre-req. So, if your particular program is requiring more, AND you're also planning on earning your BSN later - then that's not a bad thing. I'd say it's worth it.

It depends on how badly you want to become a nurse. Believe me, I get it. Waiting for anything stinks, especially when you want it badly. I am a very impatient person by nature. And there is a ton of waiting involved in nursing school (prerequisites, applying half a year before the programs actually start). But if you really want it, get started on those prerequisites as soon as you can!

londonflo

Specializes in oncology. Has 44 years experience.

On 6/17/2020 at 8:51 PM, jezziejpg said:

quire 2 years of prerequisites which are offered through a Health Sciences A.A degree. To me it sounds like a waste of time and money, but is this the track most current nurses chose?

Nursing involves theory and strategies from other disciplines as well. I do not know of a nursing program that teaches anatomy and physiology but this content is necessary to understand pharmacokinetics and the disease process. The teaching is best left to those that specialized in that area. The "diploma nursing program" of days gone by this but did take 3 years and most content was taught by the nursing faculty (there still are some diploma schools still in existance but they too incorporate prerequisites and electives from a higher education source.) Unfortunately courses taught by nursing faculty did not easily transfer to future schools.

I am not sure you know but nursing education has made great strides in the last 30 years. Nursing is seen as a profession that requires college level work. A student can start the nursing path in a one year program to be a practical nurse and with the articulation agreements in place, finish their nursing education with a doctorate. Cost is easier when absorbed in smaller steps.

Someone else said, you can investigate taking a college-level course at your high school. Usually there is no cost. Do make sure you are first taking all the high school courses for your foundation to do college work. College classes, even at community colleges, are usually more difficult and faster-paced than high school classes, and by taking one or more in high school, you can be better prepared for college. This will likely help you get better grades and feel less stressed as a college student.