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Is working twd BSN worth it? Will ADN do?

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I have my ADN and have been working as a registered nurse for 3 years now. I've applied and been accepted into a BSN program. I could get it done in 3 semesters.. going full time of course. I'm happy with my job and don't know that the added stress of school would really be worth it, plus def would put another even bigger hole in the student loan folder. Other than the level of accomplishment once completed... that right now seems to be the only thing saying "DO IT"

anyone done this? Thoughts? Input?

would of course eventually probably work twd MSN-FNP if I did continue, just because I'm that kind of person.. as most of us nurses are. =) LOL

Do it. Should you ever work at a place where everyone is given the BSN ultimatum, just think how much less stress you will have because you got it out of the way. Then consider all of the job listings that state "BSN required" that you can apply to without any reservations about being considered. Those are two of the more important reasons to do it. And congrats on being accepted!

Moogie

Specializes in Gerontology, nursing education.

Three semesters? You can do it! It won't be easy if you're working full-time but it's very doable.

If you're planning on going to graduate school, you'll want to keep your GPA as high as possible. You might consider dropping your work hours somewhat or taking your BSN program a little more slowly.

Do you have tuition reimbursement at your place of employment? That could help you so that you don't have to take out any loans. It would also lessen the amount of financial stress you'd have so you could take the program more slowly if you wanted.

And yes, congratulations on getting in!

llg, PhD, RN

Specializes in Nursing Professional Development. Has 43 years experience.

Do it. You may not need it now ... but it will give you more options in the future ... and you may want those options.

If the stress of going full time is an issue, can you go part time and take a little longer? A lot of programs have a part time option. It sounds like you have no reason to be in a rush. I'd recommend doing it, but looking for ways to stay healthy and happy at the same time.

Thanks guys for the response and encouragement. I'm definitely considering going for it.

A little background though to let you see more of my hesitancy.

For one, where I live you don't get paid anymore for a BSN vs ADN. None at all. So the only help it would seem would be if I decided to continue from there.

We are talking on starting a family.. so school, work AND preparing for a new one .. I guess that school money is money I could be saving for the future.

Then the big one for me.. my husband is applying to med school for next year.. so if all goes well, by the time he's done with school I can just work per diem.. therefore making it not even necessary for me to continue my ed.. except only just for my own satisfaction only. =)

So while without knowing that it's a simple decision to continue.. but when I think hey- I can just go per diem once he's done.. I'd almost rather have the time off work to relax vs doing so much school work and papers. Still considering that, just wanted to add a little more background =)

Thanks again guys!

I actually signed on to ask a very similar question. I have been an ADN for almost 10 years and have always wanted to go for my BSN. I was accepted into a program that is perfect for my lifestyle but the price tag is pretty steep. I don't get any tuition help from where I work, so it will all come from savings, which will basically wipe it out. I know getting a BSN will give me more opportunities, but there's also a real chance that I may work the next 20 years in a field that only requires an ADN. I just wanted to hear a few good reasons you all might have to just go for it.

akulahawkRN, ADN, RN, EMT-P

Specializes in Emergency Department. Has 5 years experience.

Thanks guys for the response and encouragement. I'm definitely considering going for it.

A little background though to let you see more of my hesitancy.

For one, where I live you don't get paid anymore for a BSN vs ADN. None at all. So the only help it would seem would be if I decided to continue from there.

We are talking on starting a family.. so school, work AND preparing for a new one .. I guess that school money is money I could be saving for the future.

Then the big one for me.. my husband is applying to med school for next year.. so if all goes well, by the time he's done with school I can just work per diem.. therefore making it not even necessary for me to continue my ed.. except only just for my own satisfaction only. =)

So while without knowing that it's a simple decision to continue.. but when I think hey- I can just go per diem once he's done.. I'd almost rather have the time off work to relax vs doing so much school work and papers. Still considering that, just wanted to add a little more background =)

Thanks again guys!

If he can get through Med School with no significant debt... otherwise, he's going to be working a LOT to pay his loans off. Once the loans are paid off/forgiven, then life will be come MUCH nicer. Personally, I like learning stuff. So I'll just have to keep on taking a course every now and then to learn something new!

I actually signed on to ask a very similar question. I have been an ADN for almost 10 years and have always wanted to go for my BSN. I was accepted into a program that is perfect for my lifestyle but the price tag is pretty steep. I don't get any tuition help from where I work, so it will all come from savings, which will basically wipe it out. I know getting a BSN will give me more opportunities, but there's also a real chance that I may work the next 20 years in a field that only requires an ADN. I just wanted to hear a few good reasons you all might have to just go for it.

personal satisfaction is pretty much it. I'm never really complacent. I'm satisfied and thankful with my success this far, but always ready and willing to expand and move forward. =)

If he can get through Med School with no significant debt... otherwise, he's going to be working a LOT to pay his loans off. Once the loans are paid off/forgiven, then life will be come MUCH nicer. Personally, I like learning stuff. So I'll just have to keep on taking a course every now and then to learn something new!

oh yeah- we def know he'll have sig debt. We already do from my schooling, and his schooling he's gone through so far. BUT we're living off my little RN wages now and paying off what we can, so we're pretty used to living on a little bit of nothing. It works for us.

I actually did go ahead and register for the fall so I could get the classes I need. Had already applied for loans just in case I did want to go, because- well, I can't pay out of pocket for it right now.. so unless something changes, I'll be going for it.

part of what pushed me to go ahead and register is the garbage we've had going on with my floor. The patient load is horrible. and my stress level has been going through the roof. It's making the FNP career look a lot more appealing. Yes, stressful, but a different kind of stress depending on the job. So who knows. Just taking it one day at a time. What will come will come. Life is too short, so I'm not going to dwell on it =)

But def keep this thread going. I love to hear other's experiences and input! =) Thanks all!:yeah:

Tweety, BSN, RN

Specializes in Med-Surg, Trauma, Ortho, Neuro, Cardiac. Has 28 years experience.

I'm with the "go for it and get it out of the way crowd". New grad entry level bedside nurses that are BSN's and ADNs are indeed going to make similar salaries. That's only fair since both take the same RN boards and are new on equal footing. But as llg says it's more of an investment in your future (and your families) and the rewards are not going to immediate.

However, as some say you can always get it later, get help paying for it, but "later" for me was 16 years, as I never found the time and motivation and I wished I'd gotten it out fo the way ealier. All the best.