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Is nursing your second career?

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by nicubee nicubee (Member)

1,858 Profile Views; 49 Posts

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49 Posts; 1,858 Profile Views

You are all helping so much-- thanks everyone for your responses. I think there are lots of 2nd career people hoping to confirm that the nursing field will be all that they anticipate and worth the effort. I know people burn out as nurses and move on to other careers, but I think those that choose it as a 2nd profession often do their research and really try to know what they're getting into. At least I hope so...

FLmomof5, Congratulations! I will also finish at 49 (if I'm accepted for Fall) Baubo516, Good Luck. dfs1961, Wow-- 2 bachelors and 2 masters. I'm tired just thinking about it. jahra, thanks for the vote of confidence.

Keep posting-- the more opinions on this the better!

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2,801 Posts; 13,318 Profile Views

Just curious, what about nursing appeals to you that you don't get as an OT?

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49 Posts; 1,858 Profile Views

jjjoy, in my area of specialization (pediatrics-NICU), OT focuses primarily on developmental skills: infant neurobehavioral and neuromotor function, the development of po feeding skills, and family education. I do love everything about it. The nurses in this area focus primarily on medical care, but also support neurobehavioral and neuromotor function (in the form of developmental care and positioning), the development of po feeding skills, and family education (i.e. lots of overlap in our roles). They have more time to focus on the needs of their assigned babies (I follow 20 or more at a time), and are present when more families are there for education (I have more limited hours). Of their skills, medical caregiving is obviously strong while the other areas require a lot of extra learning (one reason I'm present on the unit). Without this learning, they can inadvertently contribute to neuromotor deficits or long-term feeding problems. If I obtain my BSN, I will be strong in all those areas, which will really benefit the infants in my care. I will have the ability to support their development during each necessary medical interaction, even for the sickest and most fragile infants, who are generally too unstable to receive direct OT intervention but tend to be at the highest developmental risk. In the hospital, the focus is and must be on medical stability and survival. Once home, however, infant development becomes paramount and parents watch for every new skill their infant learns.

My other reason is for increased job stability: I love this unit and hope to work NICU until I retire. However, most hospitals hire small numbers of therapists vs. nurses for this unit. Some don't even employ therapists for NICU. I want to maximize my ability to work with neonates no matter where I live.

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Teaching was my first career. I loved it, but where I lived I could not afford even a modest mortgage on the salary. I saw my RN friends making decent money, good schedule, and enjoying their jobs, so I decided to go to nursing school.

Now I am 7 weeks away from graduating. Classes were very difficult. I had a 3.9 GPA from my 1st degree, and now struggle to keep 84%. We have lost over half our class. Good people who studied hard, and just couldn't pass the tests!

Now I find out the local hospital may not be hiring new grads at all! It is a small community, and the hospital is pretty much the only place to work. I actually live in a state now that pays teachers better than nurses. So I recently applied for a teaching job, and will also still apply for RN, to see what happens. I am not that excited about nursing at the hospital. It seems very stressful, and kind-of chaotic. Quite a few patients end up there for repeatedly drinking themselves sick. Many are diabetics and obese. Lots of cirrhosis. The hospital is primary care, so we are very busy doing all of the "hands on" work. I think it would be a good and rewarding thing to take care of these patients with love and compassion. But for me, I dream of getting back to teaching. That is frustrating to find out after all the money and time for nursing school. But, hey, that's what life is all about I guess.

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2 Followers; 8,863 Posts; 46,661 Profile Views

I know people burn out as nurses and move on to other careers, but I think those that choose it as a 2nd profession often do their research and really try to know what they're getting into. At least I hope so...

Imo it is more that it is new, fresh and we haven't been doing it for the past 20 years. I'm loving nursing, making decent money and plan for it to be my final career however I know I would have hated it as a young person so for me its as much about the timing, having sowed my wild oats and being realistic in that nothing is perfect more than doing my research prior to starting. :D

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Baubo516 is a RN and specializes in Skilled Nursing/Rehab.

405 Posts; 13,864 Profile Views

greenstar - what state pays teachers more than nurses? I live in Iowa, and nurses here make more than I do as a teacher. But, I also teach at a parochial school, so we make less money. With teaching, I feel like there is always work I could/should be doing when I am at home. I work the 8 hour day, have 2 hours of extra-curriculars, and then planning for the next 8 hour day. I often have evening and weekend commitments for my job, as I am a music teacher. I realize that as a nurse I may work evenings and weekends, but I think it will be nice to do my work at work, and not to be expected to go home and do 2 more hours of planning for the next day of work!

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1,062 Posts; 14,644 Profile Views

Nicubee,

In my opinion, you can never be wrong to be trained in 2 different

areas. You will have a unique background when you complete your

nursing studies and keep up your OT credentials.

In a difficult job market, having more than one set of skills makes

you better qualified for your area of interest. That translates to

job security.

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71 Posts; 2,349 Profile Views

I was a vet tech for 12 years with an associate's degree. I loved it, and hated it. Loved the nursing part and the contact with clients, but hated the inconsistancy and lack of regulation in the veterinary field. Not to mention how awful vets are at running a business. Ive worked in research, private practice, vet school...I just couldnt make enough money and could only go so far up the ladder.

I decided to go back to school for nursing and will start a nursing program this fall. Im 34. I intend to continue on and get a msn. Not sure whether to pursue CRNA or NP.

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Carrig RN specializes in ICU.

165 Posts; 4,419 Profile Views

I came from a background in management and finance. Four years of undergrad and about two years of full-time work experience. Sitting at a computer and a desk 8 hours a day was sucking out my soul. I was depressed and bored. I started volunteering at a hospital after work, loved talking to the patients and hearing their stories, and realized that I actually was coming out of my funk. Took the few pre-reqs I had left, got accepted to an ABSN program, and graduated in December. Will be starting at my first RN job in less than two weeks. I've never looked back. Can't wait to start my new career!

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Hi, I'm new to this forum, and I have to say thank you for asking this question. I have been struggling with this topic for a few years now. I am a mother of 2, with a BS degree in Business Administration. After several years of working hard and NOT getting anywhere in the banking industry, I started thinking about going back to school and becoming a Nurse. It's a scary decision for me because I just don't want to make a mistake. I was so frustrated with banking, and the financial industry, wasn't making enough money, at the time I was a single mother, and just never got the promotions. It just seemed the harder I worked, the more work they gave me, and not what I had hoped which was more opportunities. I loooked into Nursing school, been doing research for while, and just love the idea of it. I am a big people person, and love helping others. I guess I could go on and on, but I will spare you, LOL, I am still worried about certain things, I haven't been in college in years, and just in general looking for some encouragement and wondering who else was in the same boat as I am. I've contacted the local Nursing program, and have dates as to when to take the prereq. classes and what not, but am concerned about cost, and how long it will take before I can earn some money. Currently I am at home with my kids and the job market looks really grim, as I am wanting to go back to work, but to what? Long hours at a job I hate? I was also looking for some advice. Thanks for asking this question.

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JeanineG2885 specializes in geriatrics, rehab, med-surg, psychiatric.

10 Posts; 727 Profile Views

Nurses provide education to their patients :-). I think its a diversity in careers that makes nurses as great as they are...

Edited by tnbutterfly
Please do not post links to off-site personal blogs

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112 Posts; 3,344 Profile Views

I am a lawyer in my third semester of nursing school. I have been working as a tech for almost a year, and will be an extern at the same hospital this summer. I love it, and can't wait to graduate so that I will have time to help people as a nurse in the hospital, and help people as a lawyer (as an advocate through various organizations).

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