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Is anyone getting into nursing programs with a realistic GPA?

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Era324 Era324 (New) New

Hello all,

Thanks for reading. I am just wondering if anyone has gotten into the program with a 3.5 or so lately? It seems now a days its impossible, and a 3.5 is a very, very tough gpa to get. 3.7-4.0 just seems so far-fetched.

Thank you very much. I need some hope, ive always wanted to be a nurse and I dont have a 4.0 :uhoh3: i have a 3.5 overall, but I have a 3.68 in the sciences if that matters. I haven't applied but am going to for winter.

I totally sympathize. I have 3.6 GPA and some places have told me flat out that my GPA might be too low to get into their program. Hearing news like this can be truly disheartening sometimes.

But have you looked into applying to nursing programs where they are looking for students with more rounded experiences? Some places give you extra admission points if you've worked as a CNA or have volunteered a certain number of hours at a healthcare facility

Oh wow, thats tough. :(

What schools have told you that?

And to think my sister got into a competitive admission nursing program 7 years ago with a 3.0 and a bunch of retakes.. And shes an excellent nurse now. Its so hard now. :(

grownuprosie

Has 1 years experience.

Bellevue College goes off of TEAS score. I got in with a 3.0. I think they added an interview and essay portion for next year, but it is still primarily TEAS.

I just heard someone who has a 4.0 GPA and had gotten a 95% on their entrance exam....so that should give us all an idea as to how hard it will be to get into nursing school :(

I have a 3.8, a previous bachelors degree, and I work as a CNA in a hospital. I have been waitlisted by every CC I've applied to. It is so completely frustrating, but it does seem easier to get into BSN programs if you want to go that route.

NNP-2018

Specializes in NICU, L&D and ED. Has 6 years experience.

TCC does a lottery system for their program and Pierce does more of a point system. At Pierce you need to write a personal statement based off some questions they give you, have a professional and personal recommendations, and functional resume. You get points for each of those and you also get extra points for taking organic chem, foreign languages, stats and developmental psych. The students with the most points get an interview and the accepted students are chosen from there.

Looks like with each year it's getting harder and harder. I got accepted to program where all nursing students have a previous degree and the lowest GPA is 3.85....

what schools rejected such high gpas? this is ridiculous..

also.. im in my first year of prereqs and graduated high school one yr ago. im quite alarmed by this high gpa talk.

i dont understand why people with previous degrees get a leg up over people who get it right the first time and dive into nursing fresh out of high school, people who have wanted to be nurses all their life and nothing else. I guess passion doesnt matter anymore? sorry, just venting. i feel there should be points for people who are like us and are passionate all our lives... can anyone tell me if there are schools that are fair around here? thank you everyone

what schools rejected such high gpas? this is ridiculous..

also.. im in my first year of prereqs and graduated high school one yr ago. im quite alarmed by this high gpa talk.

i dont understand why people with previous degrees get a leg up over people who get it right the first time and dive into nursing fresh out of high school, people who have wanted to be nurses all their life and nothing else. I guess passion doesnt matter anymore? sorry, just venting. i feel there should be points for people who are like us and are passionate all our lives... can anyone tell me if there are schools that are fair around here? thank you everyone

Not to sound snarky, but if you just graduated high school, then you probably haven't lived long enough to know the difference between passion and desire. However, deciding on a career path at a young age is a good thing and should be applauded, but now you are getting a taste of the real world where everybody in these times are desperate to make and keep a standard of living, so the competition is stiff for nursing school and nursing jobs. Heck, teenagers at McDonalds are fighting senior citizens that have had to come out of retirement for them positions. Good luck to you. I'm sure you will get into a program.

I recently got accepted into WSU's nursing program and it was crazy competitive getting in. My GPA was 3.95 and I still felt the process of getting an interview was hard. With so many applicants these days schools can afford to be super picky. Some schools weigh GPA heavily while some take more of a whole-person approach as was touched on in previous posts. It was crazy being in college anatomy and chemistry classes with people retaking the class because they needed to get higher than a 3.4-3.5 to be competitive.

mamayogibear

Specializes in None yet.

Since nursing is a profession and there are all ready so many new grads that can't find jobs I think it is apt that programs have high standards for admissions. Although I dont' start nursing school for another month I feel proud of having earned a spot in nursing school, while parenting and working to support my family. I think there are a few schools that don't look at GPA when admitting students though. TCC is a lottery and both Clover park and Bates admit to waitlists so there are numerous routes to become a nurse even if you don't make the highest grades.

LetUrLightShineRN

Specializes in Critical Care.

I have spent a lot of time thinking about the process of becoming a nurse ie.) pre-reqs, entrance exams, specific requirements such as becoming a licensed certified nursing assistant, etc. An argument can be made to support the claim that grades are not an accurate predictor of the kind of nurse the student will become. For example a parent who must work and care for their family while attending school is going to have less available time to study which will likely impact their grades, but this person is very diligent, caring, smart, and is a team player. And then on the other hand a different student might have the lucky fortune of not having to work during school and focuses their time to their studies and maintains a 4.0 gap but this student wants to be a nurse for the money and does not really enjoy working with people. That being said, I want the best and brightest to be caring for me, for my family. I don't want a surgeon who made a b average in school I want the smartest and most skilled surgeon. Same goes for nurses, we save lives. I want to really know and understand the material I am learning in school because soon it will be a matter of life or death for another human being. It is very realistic to expect an a average in the prereq classes to determine how hard a student is prepared to work to become the best nurse they can be.

The "sciences matter" very much they are the foundation of medicine and if you want to be a nurse you need to be solid not just cutting it. We have to make sacrifices, I have friends who are really torn because they miss their children, I have turned down countless social invitations, missed birthdays, holidays, football games because I needed to study. We had to create a budget to deal with our decreased income when I quit my job to go back to school. It's about working hard and sacrificing. I've never seen anyone who REALLY wants to be a nurse fail.

mamayogibear

Specializes in None yet.

As a single mom to two kids who worked while completing pre-reqs and maintained a 4.0 gpa, I do not like your argument that grades are not an accurate predictor. True someone may earn all A's but not be compassionate and comprehend caring theory but I doubt someone would continue far if they do not truly care about being a nurse. There are also some students who despite a desire and want to become a nurse are not quite smart enough to make the cut, this may be a sad fact for those students but will likely be better for society as a whole. After all if someone crumbles under the stress and pressure of a simple test, how will that person hold up under the real pressure of saving someones life.

I too am a single mom and have maintained a 3.9 gpa. No offense but the last two posts are very smug sounding. If we all went to the same school, and had the same teachers, your argument would be solid BUT not all teachers or schools, grade the same. I spent a good year and a half at Shoreline and the science classes were extremly difficult. The dean once told me it was not uncommon for students to fail the first attempt and have to retake the class. Very few students got 4.0s at Shoreline VERY FEW! I switched schools and about half of my anatomy class got a 4.0. My teacher was a very easy grader and offered mostly multipal choice answers on the exam. Yes I studied a lot but the two schools were like night and day!!

Ten years ago the average gpa was much lower than it is today. My point is that if you really want to be a nurse and have a lower than 4.0 gpa there are pleanty of schools that will accept you. You should follow your dream and know that perfect grades do not always paint the whole picture :)

nubsthedog, what school did you go to that had the easy grading teacher for anatomy?

Hi Era324,

When I say easy I meant compared to my Shoreline teacher ----. I spent a good 30 hrs a week studying and was getting around a 2.5. Her exams were insane! I went to Seattle Central and took ------. He is an incredible teacher!! He is a fair grader and his exams were based off the lecture notes. Anatomy is a difficult class period, but I feel that with ------ you have a fighting chance. He is also really nice and is willing to help you after class. He truly wants his students to succeed and you can tell he loves teaching. You should go to rate my professor (if you haven't already) it's a great website and gives feed back from students :)

Edited by dianah
Terms of Service re: posting names

LetUrLightShineRN

Specializes in Critical Care.

Mama bear I think I did not make my point clearly, I believe that grades should not be the only determining factor in the selection process for nursing school. I have met many "hardcore academic" know it alls who are not getting into the profession because they are team players, or sincerely compassionate. Nursing isn't defined by how you perform on an exam, it's thinking on your feet during stressful situations, it's steeling yourself in the face of watching a family member determine that it's time to withdraw care and say goodbye, it's working 12 hour shifts and then having to spend another 2 tedious hours charting, it's dealing with hospital bureaucracy, it's adapting to constant change, new techniques, best practices, software, policies, management, it's being an advocate for your patient even if that means challenging a doctor or a peer. They don't teach us very much about this in nursing school some of it is innate within us, some of it is learned only through experience.

The schools that only look at GPA are doing a disservice to the profession. That being said I feel that we all should be held to the highest standard and expect excellence from ourselves and each other through nursing school and throughout our careers.

I am not smug, but I am proud to be in nursing school knowing that I worked very hard to earn the right to be here. As someone who returned to school at 32 with a history of struggling in remedial math and crappy study habits in college at 18, I was honestly fearful that I wouldn't be able to do it. I had to check my ego at the door and just give it 100% and hope it was good enough. I feel that most people don't make the sacrifices in time to dedicate to studying and this is why they don't get As. I don't think I'm smarter than everyone else I was just lucky enough to have the support of my family, and I made studying my number one priority because I want to be a nurse and I will do what it takes. I wish all of the students applying to nursing school the best of luck and hope you succeed in achieving your dreams:)