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Internships and ADHD

Katgeb Katgeb (New) New

Alright, so I am now on my fourth internship and I had recently been diagnosed with ADHD at 22 years old (finally realized I am not stupid I just have that holding me back). I have been having a lot of problems with managing and prioritizing tasks, creating or following a plan, adjusting to unexpected tasks (working with post-op patients I guess tasks can pop up unexpectedly), writing out a detailed nursing note... so basically managing everything in general. I am currently unmedicated. Had tried Wellbutrin but that had only caused me more problems. It is difficult to get in to see my doctor, although now I have an apointment, I still have a couple weeks to get through before then. I am beginning to lose a lot of faith in myself and have the feeling that others may be as well. If anyone can give me some tips if they have been through something similar I am ready for anything. I am becoming desperate in the fear that I may fail my internship all because of my ADHD. Although I still have the motivation to move on and keep my chin up as much as possible, I fear I am running out of all that is keeping me going. Thankfully I have gotten nothing but wonderful patients that remind me why I am doing this.

Lists and flowsheets, write things down, highlighters and post it notes. Oh and work with your doctor to find the right treatment for you 😃

Edited by AGACNPTX

TheCommuter, BSN, RN

Specializes in Case mgmt., rehab, (CRRN), LTC & psych.

If anyone can give me some tips if they have been through something similar I am ready for anything.
Our terms of service forbids the exchange of medical advice, but we do wish you the very best and will hope for a good outcome in your situation.

Perhaps approach your supervisor for tips on prioritization and organization without disclosing your condition. They don't need to know why you are disorganized, only that you are ambitious enough to ask for help. Good luck.

I have already explained because at my school they talked with the teachers so I can get the full help I need. That hasn't made anything worse on my side. It has actually helped a lot since the teachers know and understand that I am not just an incompitant student trying to get away with doing nothing.

Our terms of service forbids the exchange of medical advice, but we do wish you the very best and will hope for a good outcome in your situation.

I am not asking for medical advice. Only tips to help me with keeping myself on track during my shifts.

TheCommuter, BSN, RN

Specializes in Case mgmt., rehab, (CRRN), LTC & psych.

I am not asking for medical advice. Only tips to help me with keeping myself on track during my shifts.
Are you an LPN already? Or are you in a practical / vocational nursing program?

Are you an LPN already? Or are you in a practical / vocational nursing program?

I am in vocational. Right now I am doing internships until June and then all is done. I just have to make it through them ;).

angiewdm

Specializes in ID/DD, CM, UM.

Here's some advice from a person in the same situation. Keeping yourself organized through the flowsheets and checklists etc will help, as well as carrying a clipboard with all the paperwork attached. Don't lose the clipboard (LOL, I was trying to figure out how to keep that from happening). Take short breaks to collect your thoughts and see where you are in what you need to do. When I first started nursing, it was chaotic. I had vital signs written all up my arms to write down in the chart. You will manage this and succeed, just find what works for you. Good luck!

icuRNmaggie, BSN, RN

Specializes in MICU, SICU, CICU.

I was assigned to orient an experienced RN with severe ADHD. The first preceptor was so frustrated with her inability to focus that she refused to do it anymore. It was an interesting experience. She is bright friendly hyperverbal and emotional. I am quiet introverted don't get too excited about much of anything anymore. Somehow we just clicked. I had to give her some structure or she would have run around all day doing psychomotor tasks but forgetting to check labs, orders, and chart.

Since she was an experienced nurse, she just needed to acclimate to the ICU and the routine.

She always came bursting with energy and so she started the shift with bathing the patient while doing her assessment and meds.

Once all of the "nurse work" (for lack of a better expression) was done, and she had discharged all of that energy, she was happy. She took a break and then I had her do her charting in an area where she couldn't be distracted by phones and other peoples conversations. It was an effort for her to focus on it, but she did it.

I had her use a report form with blocks and reminders for certain things like vent checks, run strips, level and zero lines etc. and end of the shift tasks, clear pumps, empty foley, enter I&O check orders.

Once she established her routine, and recovered from the nasty criticism from the previous preceptor, she came into her own.

The OP needs to find cohorts who enjoy her personality and energy level.

Working in a post op unit is pretty cookie cutter, same care plan, IS, SCDs, chemical DVT prophyllaxis, PCAs Epidurals JP drains pain assessments, wound vacs, foley d/cd POD2. Everything is q 4 hrs, VS, empty the JP, recording PCA attempts and totals, sump the NGT, ambulate in the hall or up in the chair, except for turning which is q 2 hrs and IS which is q 1 hr while awake. So you chart in between providing care. Go in with a plan, a worksheet for each patient which has triggers written in at 8-12-4 for those tasks and at 6 clear pumps, empty foley, record drainage, check if IVF are low and replace if needed. Soon you will be the most efficient little nursing student and people will say Katgeb is really good to follow.:)

Edited by icuRNmaggie

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