Q: Visit hospital before applying?

  1. Hi everybody,

    since you all helped me so much the last time I hope you can give me some advise on this question as well...

    I heard that it is common in the UK to visit a hospital and get a tour before applying there for a job... is that true? I was very surprised when a friend told me this. I have now my first interview date in London and therefore I went their to see the ward and they just showed me around and told me that you normally call in before, arrange a formal meeting and so on... So for them this was just normal.

    Well, three questions:

    1. Do you only do this when you already have an interview or even when you only applied

    2. Is it important for your chances to get a job, do they take down the names? So should you maybe even do it before applying?

    3. If it is common in hospitals, do you do it as well when you apply at a GP practice?

    Thank you for any advise on this.

    Kind regards
    Viola
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    About Viola81

    Joined: Sep '06; Posts: 5

    6 Comments

  3. by   Silverdragon102
    I have always gone for a informal visit before putting in my application of after my application but before interview. This way if I don't like what I see or hear I am able to change my mind. This also applicable for practice nursing as that is where I presently work
  4. by   XB9S
    Hi Viola, like Anna I would always visit before applying just to make sure it was the right job for me, make sure you speak to as many staff as you can because then you will get a better picture of what sort of place it is to work in. As someone who also interviews and recruits I like to see that whoever is applying shows an interest in working in my unit, but if they live a long way away I wouldn't expect them to travel for an informal but have a chat on the phone.

    Good luck
  5. by   Viola81
    Hi,

    thank you very much for your feedback, that is really interesting. It is quite different to what I know from Germany. There it is like this: You have an interview and if you like the job and you are the successful candidate you do one day work for free before you start. After this day both sides finally confirm that they want to work together.

    Do you do anything like this here as well or do you sign directly the contract?

    Really glad that you can help me through this learning process :-)

    Kind regards
    Viola
  6. by   XB9S
    Viola I don't know of anywhere that would work a day then confirm, usually after interview if you are offered the post you get a formal written offer then sign contracts on your first day.

    I am advertising now for a post and I have encouraged informal chats in which I ask the person to spend a couple of hours working alongside one of my team, we are a very small department so I think it is important that any new person knows what they are letting themselves in for and my team get to know who they will be working with. Have done this for the past few years and seems to work fairly well.
  7. by   RGN1
    Two of the jobs I had I was a student at the hospital before taking up a job so I already knew the place. The job I have now I called for an informal chat before applying.

    I would always advise either a call or visit, if possible. However, I guess whin I go to the USA a visit &, quite possibly, the chat might not be so easy - we'll see. Would be interested to know what other nurses going abroad to work have done?

    It's not UK practice to work for a day for free before you both decide.
  8. by   hjfrn
    Hi there
    When I worked in the UK, I usually did an informal visit. That way you get to see what the environment is really like (and not what the advert says).
    But when I applied for a job in Canada and was unable to have an informal visit. I did have a couple of informal chats on the phone with the manager before my interview, but did not have a visit.
    The hardest part for me was interviewing over the telephone!! Hard to read that body language that you cannot see.

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