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Im Scared!

LPN/LVN   (1,372 Views 7 Comments)
by ILUVNURSING01132006 ILUVNURSING01132006 (New Member) New Member

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When people finally get out of school and get their license then their first job, how is it? Like will the whole medical team help out, if i have questions about some stuff that maybe i forgot (that i learned in school) will they help. I feel like when i do finally get my license and start working, i'll be pretty much on my own since the medical team's jobs are so important, he/she wont have time to assist me if i need help with something. Also, when u first get a job, do the other medical professionals figure "well u should know this stuff, u went to school". Like how much actual experience do people usually have before they really have the nursing thing down pack??? i'd be scared on my first job and i do something totally wrong!:uhoh21:

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TheCommuter has 10 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Case mgmt., rehab, (CRRN), LTC & psych.

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Since you use the term "medical team," I assume that you invision yourself working at a large hospital. If you secure hospital employment, you will most likely have a lengthy orientation and preceptorship to ensure that you can function independently.

I have spent most of my career at long term care facilities, where no true "medical team" exists. At a nursing home or rehab center, the "medical team" consists of the nurse and the CNAs. Therefore, you will rapidly need to learn how to take charge, because the buck stops with you.

Another fact to ponder: most new nurses receive night shift or evenings, because the more seasoned nurses are usually scheduled for day shifts. There tends to be no complete "medical team" on evening or night shift, so absorb all you possibly can. Sometimes you'll be the only license in the building.

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Fiona59 has 18 years experience.

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I work in active treatment and the orientation period is to enable you to learn the unit routine. You are expected to come with a knowledge base and build on it through experience.

The actual on the floor orientation is usually a total of five shifts. There are usually two or three "classroom" days included which are specialty specific where the new hires are all given information on the procedures they will see on their unit and to refresh/reinforce the skills that will be utilized on the floor orientation.

Hell, it's been over three years since I inserted a foley but wouldn't hesitate to ask a co-worker to come along and supervise since it had been a while, I pull lots. What skills you use can really depend on which shift you work.

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Fiona59 has 18 years experience.

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No such thing in Canada.

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pagandeva2000 is a LPN and specializes in Community Health, Med-Surg, Home Health.

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It depends on who you work with. There should be an orientation...maybe brief like two or three days, but there should be. Hospitals usually add up to about 6 weeks to two months orientation, here in New York. However, not all orientations are quality, so to speak, and also, not everyone really wants to precept a new employee. I have witnessed a bit of both, some people will take into consideration that a new grad nurse has to get her feet wet, then, there are others that are, in fact, impatient and sarcastic. I worked with my co-workers when I was an aide, and when I became an LPN, I began to see that some of the ones that I looked up to as a aide were the same ones I would run from as an LPN because they were not trustworthy or nice people.

I don't mean to place a damper on you, but I don't want to see people walk in blind and believe that each person will take you under their wing. Some folks do not remember when they first walked into a new situation and the initial fear. But, ask questions, anyway, be observant, and do nothing that does not see to be safe to you. There is usually at least ONE person that will look out for you in the beginning. Good luck!

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Iluvnursing it all depends where you work if the people will be team players. You will probably be really slow compared to other nurses which is fine because you have to get into routine. You might even forget some things but just ask other nurses..i dont think anyone will tell you NO! lol

When i started I forgot how to insert a catheter and me and the other lpn were both sticking it in the wrong place and we finally got some help after we noticed the patient seemed too uncomfortable. We were both new....

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