If You are Paying for a CNA Course... aka The Post I Wish I'd Read a Month Ago.

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by MadruGada MadruGada (New)

Author shares his background and reasons for enrolling in and attending a CNA program, as well as his experiences, and his regrets. He concludes with a piece of advice for prospective CNA students.

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jonjor2m

jonjor2m

30 Posts

I am also a former teacher making a career change in Colorado and want to be a nurse. I am also over 50. I realized to get my "feet wet" I needed to be at least a CNA. My course cost $1200 dollars and lasted about 15 days including the clinicals. It was very intense and we didn't talk about Beiber but Trump was mentioned (well it does have to do with health care, doesn't it?). I passed the test the first time I took the test and I had my first job before I passed my licensure test. Mind you this is Colorado. I can say I look at this as an extension on my clinicals which I will be having and I will have practice with patients before I start nursing school which is smart. In Colorado many many programs really want you to have a CNA or EMT experience before they will even consider you into a program. It is also good to do this because it gives you an idea of your work environment and who you will be working with. It has been mentioned that is it worth taking these classes if you are over 50 to go into nursing. I think it is. Is it worth taking all of these education classes to become a K-12 public school teacher if you are over the age of 40. No it is not. If you are an RN and don't go crazy with your loans and attend a community college, it is doable to pay back.

jonjor2m

jonjor2m

30 Posts

Ok-- I am a former teacher and also interested in nursing so I feel I can address this issue. Sometimes it is not the best idea to speak up, etc. if you have an instructor who may not pass you in the class. If the class is this disorganized and poorly constructed, the best thing is to get the credit and move on. Remember if you don't get credit for taking the class (certificate) you can't take the licensing exam. Effective teachers are more facilitators rather than authoritarian rules. An RN is more of a position of authority and the go between the doctor and the patient. Think what would happen if the RN challenged the authority of the doctor> There are other ways to do that.

shibaowner

shibaowner, MSN, RN, NP

Has 1 years experience. 3 Articles; 583 Posts

jonjor2m said:
Ok-- I am a former teacher and also interested in nursing so I feel I can address this issue. Sometimes it is not the best idea to speak up, etc. if you have an instructor who may not pass you in the class. If the class is this disorganized and poorly constructed, the best thing is to get the credit and move on. Remember if you don't get credit for taking the class (certificate) you can't take the licensing exam. Effective teachers are more facilitators rather than authoritarian rules. An RN is more of a position of authority and the go between the doctor and the patient. Think what would happen if the RN challenged the authority of the doctor> There are other ways to do that.

Nursing school and CNA school are not the time for cowardice. Patient's lives will depend on you. If you are not getting the education/training needed, then you must speak up. You don't have to be a jerk about it, though. Simply saying nicely, and with humor, something like "I love Justin Beiber, too, but we need to make sure we get the clinical skills to take care of patients, so let's get back on track" would probably work. I am an outspoken person and whenever I have done this, other students, and usually the teacher, have thanked me. Many of the people in nursing school and CNA school are very young and it is up to the rest of us who are older to behave in a mature and professional manner. In healthcare, being a coward is not admired and will not further one's career. Doctors respect honesty and professionalism. If I have paid for a course, I expect to learn the material and I would demand a refund if the the instructor did not fulfill the syllabus objectives. If someone lacks the guts to do this, then they shouldn't vent uselessly on this forum and perhaps they should reconsider nursing as a career.

jonjor2m

jonjor2m

30 Posts

One of the most important things I have learned from a life of working with a variety of ages is when to pick you battles. If I would have told my classmates, who were much younger than I was, to get back on topic I would have had no one who would be my clinical partner. This has nothing to do with about being a coward. Yes you pick battles for patients all of the time. And by the way, your quote about what you would say about Justin Beiber is very snotty. I don't think you understand about the certificate for the CNA stuff and I hope you have a work partner where you are at. You learn most of your "stuff" while working with patients in your clinicals.

shibaowner

shibaowner, MSN, RN, NP

Has 1 years experience. 3 Articles; 583 Posts

jonjor2m said:
One of the most important things I have learned from a life of working with a variety of ages is when to pick you battles. If I would have told my classmates, who were much younger than I was, to get back on topic I would have had no one who would be my clinical partner. This has nothing to do with about being a coward. Yes you pick battles for patients all of the time. And by the way, your quote about what you would say about Justin Beiber is very snotty. I don't think you understand about the certificate for the CNA stuff and I hope you have a work partner where you are at. You learn most of your "stuff" while working with patients in your clinicals.

I did successfully complete CNA school, my BSN, and my MSN and am now an NP. So I think I know a bit more than you about when to speak up. Prior to nursing, I was also a successful business executive. It is incumbent on students to get proper skills training. Do you think you are going to learn how to run IVs on live patients??!! As a CNA, skills like transferring are critical and it is dangerous to try this on an actual patient w/o training and practice. And guess what, nursing schools are not going to spoon feed students. A student needs to speak up if they are not getting the instruction required or if they need additional practice. No one will be left without a lab partner or clinical partner. In real life you don't like everyone you work with. As far as picking battles, I would say something worth fighting for is getting the education and training I paid for, especially when people's lives and safety depend on it!

jonjor2m

jonjor2m

30 Posts

Glad you do know it all....

littlelimabean01, LPN

Specializes in Geriatrics, Trach Care, Diabetes. Has 5 years experience. 69 Posts

My heart breaks for you. You were so right going into starting as a CNA to get the basics down of care that is essential for every patient you serve. When you complete your nursing degree you will be in charge of CNA's and again it was smart to learn the job of those you will soon supervise. I am just sad that you 1. had to pay so much money and 2. sit through so much non-sense by people getting a free ride. If it makes you feel any better you will learn most of what is good practice on the job. This goes for nursing as well.

I am an LPN and work in LTC and the aides that are assigned to my hall are dynamite. They stay on their hall and don't ignore basic things like oral care, good peri care and turning their patients. My co-worker, LPN that is in the same station as me has some what I call "sucky" aides. You can't find them when you need them and their patients are often found on the floor! These "sucky" aides remind me of the Ten you describe in your class.

God Bless you. You deserve a refund, but stick it out. You were already a dedicated teacher, I know you can pass the test for your CNA certificate, despite the lack of teaching. The hands on experience as a CNA will pay off when you are a RN.

shibaowner

shibaowner, MSN, RN, NP

Has 1 years experience. 3 Articles; 583 Posts

jonjor2m said:
Glad you do know it all....

Yes I do. Thank you for the acknowledgement.

CanadianAbroad

CanadianAbroad

176 Posts

God the ego coming off of you is gross behavior. You may be older in life, but your posts is childlike. Putting down those 10 individuals to try and put yourself on a horse, will only leave you to fall hard. Here is some advice, don't act like this know it all in clinicals or when you graduate and looking for a job. It isn't becoming at all.

CrunchRN, ADN, RN

Specializes in Clinical Research, Outpt Women's Health. Has 25 years experience. 4,431 Posts

You do come off a little stiff and political, but I think I get your point.

When you pay $1600.00 out of your own hard earned money you want to get what you are paying for. It seems to me the teacher should have taken better control and maybe you needed to speak with the higher ups in the school much earlier on about the issues that were causing you not to get what you paid for. All class time should have been spent on the material I would agree.

However, you will do fine and pass with all the self studying you have done and the others will not and that will be the pattern of their lives perhaps. Who cares as long as you get where you want to go?

nauticalgirl

nauticalgirl

1 Post

Quote
chacha82: re $1600 is EXPENSIVE Who cares? Just take it from the taxpayers, they're used to being screwed.

MadruGada why do you think the taxpayers are paying for these classes? Were you informed of this or is it an assumption on your part? Because what is typical is that the nursing home will pay for people to take the class. These people then agree to work for them as a CNA for a certain amount of time afterwards so it's quid quo pro.

Quote
CNAs do not make big money In New York state a CNA with just 12hrs overtime per week can gross an average of nearly $16/hr = >$40K/yr. This means a young couple with a work ethic can still buy a house. This with no college education, just a high school diploma (or even a GED) and passing a 5-week CNA course. Of course, this rarely happens anymore here in this state. It's the work ethic part of the equation that has been all but dissolved by Liberal handouts. It's a welfare mentality now, where everybody deserves a good life handed to them. They're entitled to it.

Work in a nursing home as a CNA for 52 hours every week for several years. Then please get back to me about how lucky a CNA is to make $40,000 a year working a 6 and a half day workweek. Which is implausible anyway because no facility is going to dole out overtime pay like that. There is a reason for the shortage of CNAs. You mentioned you had no interest in working in a SNF so it seems you are aware that it isn't the most pleasant environment. It is also backbreaking, exhausting work. Very high risk job for spinal injuries. Work in a hospital setting is not comparable to the workload a CNA has in a nursing home.

I took a CNA class paid by a nursing home in agreement for working there afterwards for 3 months. I was 18 and it was the summer after high school graduation. I wanted to pursue an RN degree and thought it would be helpful. Absolutely hands down the toughest physical job I've ever worked. Very emotionally draining too. The CNAs I worked with were some of the hardest working people (mostly women) that I've known. I ran track and was in great shape and still when I got off day shift my body ached. I quit as soon as the 3 months were up. When I started college I got a job in the evenings as a server. It was a very fast paced restaurant and I was on my feet all night. It was fun though and the money was really good. It was also incredibly easy IME compared to CNA work.

Esmith76

Esmith76

30 Posts

meanmaryjean said:
An RN program with only four nursing courses? Color me confused? What school is this?

The school I am in for my RN is 4 classes as well. Not sure why this is so confusing to some people? It's a two-year program, one 9-credit course per semester.