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I want to move to NYC after I graduate

Posted

Specializes in NICU.

Hi! After I graduate and get some experience in a field, I really want to move to New york (Manhattan). I currently live in San Antonio Tx, where the cost of living is considerably cheaper than that of other cities. Can a mother of a young child live in a good area with good schools on a NYC nursing salary? :typing

Manhattan is one of (if not the most) priciest cities in the 5 boroughs of NY. It's not uncommon to pay $2,000/month (and up) in rent (that does not include utilities, food, etc.) You might be able to save on gas if you stick with public transportation (you really don't need a car in Manhattan). There's a train stop almost every couple of blocks & it's easy to catch a taxi. Manhattan is very nice, but it might be more economical to live elsewhere and just commute to Manhattan. Astoria is a safe area that's not far from Manhattan. It's not cheap, but still costs less than Manhattan. In fact, Queens & Brooklyn, in general, are probably your best bets if you want to live in NYC & live a fairly comfortable life with a child. You should research areas that have the best schools--those areas tend to be good areas, too, although they are a bit pricey (but at least you get your money's worth). In my opinion, Manhattan is overpriced for little space. For the same money, you can find much bigger space & a better overall value if you live elsewhere. I love NY and wouldn't want to live anywhere else. I live on Long Island--it's about 40 minutes by train to Manhattan. Hope I answered your question. :wink2:

tachybradyRN

Specializes in ICU, Emergency Department. Has 7 years experience.

There are plenty of nice areas in Queens that aren't a terribly far commute from Manhattan and a heck of a lot more affordable. I currently live on Long Island w/ my parents, but my boyfriend teaches Special Ed at a school in Queens and we plan to move to Queens together when I'm established in my career. I also am looking into Manhattan hospitals, but the rent is outrageously high and I know that on a starting salary, I would not be able to afford to live comfortably. For me, I'd rather live in a nice area that I can afford and commute than live really local to the hospital but have to subsist paycheck-to-paycheck.

Plus, if you're thinking Manhattan, renting is really the only viable option for most people... for me, I'd rather be putting a down payment and mortgage payments on a house or condo than pouring rent into a black hole of an apartment for the rest of my life. Just my :twocents:.

I would see what hospital you end up working for before trying to decide where to live. Public transportation is a fact of life in New York City, and it isn't going to make much sense to live in the middle of Brooklyn if you work at Columbia Pres, nor will it work to live in Queens and work in Coney Island.

I would strongly recommend checking out school ratings as well. I've heard that many of the schools in Queens are better than most of the city, but I don't have any hard facts.

You may also want to consider parts of NJ and/or Westchester (again, depending on the hospital), as these areas *typically* have better schools.

Manhattan would probably be my last choice of places to live in NYC. It is too congested and noisy. Like someone mentioned, try Queens, NYC or Long Island.

IndigoCarmine

Specializes in L&D. Has 8 years experience.

As a native New Yorker who grew up in Manhattan and has been an RN in NYC for five years I can tell you right now that under no circumstances can you live in Manhattan with a child on an RN salary even if you work at the highest paying hospital. There's just no way...unless you take some serious hits to your quality of life. Like food.

Apartments, even the "cheap" ones, are outrageous here. Simply outrageous. A one bedroom apt that faces a brick wall and gets no light and is on the sixth floor with no elevator will still cost you upwards of $1700 in Manhattan. And that's cheap! And that's not taking into account the 15% of one year's rent to cover the real estate broker's fee, first and last month's rent AND a one month security deposit. NYC is crazy when it comes to housing.

There are many lovely safe neighborhoods with good schools in all the other boros, and you can get to any major hospital by bus or subway. Housing, however, can still eat half your monthly income.

I agree that job first/apt later is a good tactic if you want to ensure that your commute isn't too long. You should cruise Craigslist and check out some of the housing prices there, then compare them to a map of hospitals to give you an idea of distance. NYC is chock-a-block with hospitals.

Good luck and keep us posted!

elizabells, BSN, RN

Specializes in NICU.

and it isn't going to make much sense to live in the middle of Brooklyn if you work at Columbia Pres,

Eh, I did it. It wasn't so bad. I don't have kids, though. :)

Hi! After I graduate and get some experience in a field, I really want to move to New york (Manhattan). I currently live in San Antonio Tx, where the cost of living is considerably cheaper than that of other cities. Can a mother of a young child live in a good area with good schools on a NYC nursing salary? :typing

I live right next to NYC, in North NJ. I would love to live in Manhattan (I actually am used to city life, and don't mind taking suways, etc) but even for me w/o a child, it would be outrageously expensive to rent an apt. Forget about trying 'buy' an apt. unless you have serious money now. I can tell you that I pay 2.5 times less what some friends in Manhattan pay for a 1 bedroom apt, and theirs is much smaller. I also wouldn't want to live in just any part of Manhattan (some areas are not so safe, and not so nice, esp. if you want a decent school for your child), and would prefer something like the West Village where it's quieter, and nicer apts. Yet, I would have to pay over $2500/month for a 1 bedroom or more, plus utilities. The upper west or upper east side area also nice, but major $$$ for decent apt. even the tiniest.

If you really like NYC, you can live in other boroughs and take the train as some have suggested. You can even live in north NJ like Hoboken or Weekhawken (still city-like) and pay much less rent, and just take 5-10 min on the path to Manhattan. These cities aren't that cheap either, but compared to Manhattan they are.

Or elswhere in north NJ, maybe just 15 min-20 min away, and find a much better deal for rent.

If you are looking to settle with a child, it's not that easy in NYC. Most people I know have roommates or just got lucky and had a cheap apt. years ago, and managed to keep their rent now. I don't think you can get those anymore.

Okay, while I agree with you all about the high cost of rent and stuff, somehow it doesn't change the fact that (for me) living in NYC is something I am willing to compromise on whether it eating spaghetti 7 days a week. But again, it is just me, so as a parent I can't comment. BBBuuutttt, if I did have a child, I wouldn't necessarily discount it either. There is still a lot of things you can do with kids that don't have to cost an arm and a leg.

LoriNJ

Specializes in Medical ICU, Orthopedics.

If you live and work in NYC, aren't you also paying New York State AND City tax?

Okay, while I agree with you all about the high cost of rent and stuff, somehow it doesn't change the fact that (for me) living in NYC is something I am willing to compromise on whether it eating spaghetti 7 days a week. But again, it is just me, so as a parent I can't comment. BBBuuutttt, if I did have a child, I wouldn't necessarily discount it either. There is still a lot of things you can do with kids that don't have to cost an arm and a leg.

They are not telling her not to move into New York City, what they are saying is for someone whose never lived in the city before, Manhattan probably wouldn't be the best place to try and start off where the other boroughs are cheaper. Queens actually has some really beautiful spots that are kinda expensive but you'll get a lot more out of them than you will in manhattan where you have to pay over 2 grand for something like a basement studio. Also Long Island and certain parts of Brooklyn (Park Slope, Greenpoint, Bensonhurst). There are also some nice places right off the border of Manhattan such as Westchester and Yonkers.

Come on up to Westchester County! North of NYC...we are approx 30 min. by car. Access to the city by subway, bus or the Metro North.

fawnsternurse

Specializes in psych, medical, drug rehab. Has 24 years experience.

Wow! I didnt realize it was only 30 minutes to Manhattan. What Hospitals are in Westchester that one may apply too ?

Depends on what city in Westchester you are looking (upper or lower Westchester) and also depends on which route you take.....there's White Plains Hosp., Sound Shore Medical Ctr., Mount Vernon Hosp, Lawrence Hosp., St. Joseph's....

what about finishing school in NY, I want to move back to NY as well but how hard is it to find a job at a hospital as a tech until you finish school. I can afford to live off my spouse salary as a officer outside of ny of course but I need to continue working.

What is the salary a tech makes in the hospital?

are there any Westchester hospital hiring techs?

I wanted to point something out here, people say living in NY is so expensive and this is true, however, so is living in the south, when you make only 22hr at the most, and you still have to pay 1600 to 1700 to live in a decent neighborhood, groceries, gas, and utilities it all balances itself out. Now you can also move to NY and find a less expensive place to live at instead of moving to manhattan - so dont be afraid of NY living here and living up north NY has alot more to offer, I am trying to get back home myself :smokin:

evie119

Specializes in CNA, PCT.

My job for the past 17 years has been a Property Mgr/Real Estate Broker so I can tell you first hand about the rents. They are REDICULOUS!!! I manage 6 buildings in Manhattan. 2 in the wesst 80s, 2 in the west 100s and 2 in east harlem. Small studios can start as much as 1800. I make a pretty good salary net 45k and will not spend my entire paycheck to pay my rent.I grew up on the upper west side of Manhattan but I have lived in the Bronx for the past 10 years. The Bronx gets a really bad rep and people who dont know it would feel intimidated by it. But you can still get a really good deal there and you can make it to Manhattan in 45 minutes or less. Same goes for certain parts of Queens, Brooklyn etc. Manhattan has been WAY out of price since the early 1990s but it seems to be leveling off a bit.Expect to sacrifice space for living in a "she she" area if you want to live in Manhattan.

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