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I feel horrible

CNA/MA   (1,218 Views | 8 Replies)
by Cna1245 Cna1245 (New) New

129 Profile Views; 3 Posts

I feel like I shout quit as a cna the other day I left someone on the bedpan for far to long because I got extremely busy and forgot until around the end of my shift I took actions immediately as I remembered and put zgaurd on and got her off her butt now I found out my fellow aide wrote a grievance on me about it and I feel like *** I feel ashamed and feel that I should quit this is my first time having something like this happen and I'm worried I'm going to loose my job and brand new license

 

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AlissaTaylor13 has 3 years experience as a CNA and specializes in Float Pool.

38 Posts; 221 Profile Views

I don't think you should quit. Everyone makes mistakes or forgets things, and as long as you own up to it and try to be more aware next time then I think you should continue to work as a CNA. Hopefully your employer will allow you to use this as a learning experience since you are still new (assuming you are new if your license is new).

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Sour Lemon has 9 years experience.

3 Followers; 4,485 Posts; 33,680 Profile Views

On 5/18/2020 at 1:53 PM, Cna1245 said:

I feel like I shout quit as a cna the other day I left someone on the bedpan for far to long because I got extremely busy and forgot until around the end of my shift I took actions immediately as I remembered and put zgaurd on and got her off her butt now I found out my fellow aide wrote a grievance on me about it and I feel like *** I feel ashamed and feel that I should quit this is my first time having something like this happen and I'm worried I'm going to loose my job and brand new license

 

I guarantee you're not the first one who's done this. I might help to keep a little task list in your pocket to help you remember loose ends. It takes an extra few seconds to jot down "203 BD (room 203 bed pan)", but it helps in the long run and makes everything more efficient. 

I also have a habit of sharing responsibility with my coworkers. I tell them what I'm up to in passing and they do the same. Then we remind each other what's going on.

If your patient is capable, you can also instruct them to call instead of waiting for your eventual return. Setting a reminder timer for yourself might be another strategy.

 

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bitter_betsy has 1 years experience as a BSN and specializes in Emergency / Disaster.

337 Posts; 4,411 Profile Views

If your fellow aide wrote a grievance on you about the situation and THEY knew and didn't remove the patient either - they are just as much to blame as you.  I'd be super angry they didn't at least come tell me - hey so and so is still on the bed pan - don't forget - or do you need help?  But to know and say or do nothing is just as bad for that patient.  As a supervisor I'd be more angry at that person than you because they KNEW and didn't bother to fix it.

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3 Posts; 129 Profile Views

I also lost my job today so guess I dont have to worry about quiting

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5 Followers; 37,751 Posts; 104,451 Profile Views

1 hour ago, Cna1245 said:

I also lost my job today so guess I dont have to worry about quiting

Sorry to hear this. Don’t hesitate in looking for a new position. There is a facility out there that will appreciate your help.

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Sour Lemon has 9 years experience.

3 Followers; 4,485 Posts; 33,680 Profile Views

On 5/21/2020 at 11:52 PM, Cna1245 said:

I also lost my job today so guess I dont have to worry about quiting

I'm sorry. If that was their only reason for letting you go, that seems rather harsh.

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3 Posts; 129 Profile Views

It was because I didn't report it to the nurse who was in report 

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14 Followers; 4,196 Posts; 32,708 Profile Views

Not to stray too far off-topic, but that so many people treat incident reports as some kind of "gotcha" is a problem.

You should have been the one filling out the incident report and verbally reporting your error to your superior immediately. Not only because that represents taking responsibility for the error, but primarily because responding to the tissue injury, treating it, and further monitoring of it is outside your scope of practice other than any activities that would be delegated to you by the patient's nurse.

An incident report is not something that should be filled out "against" coworkers; it's especially wrong if we report something based on our opinions of the people involved (whether we like them/they are our friend, etc). Reporting errors promptly and accurately is a duty of each one of us.

That said, if I worked in an area where the patient population routinely stayed in the same place, I would fear this error. It certainly can happen very easily and is one of those terrible yet understandable things.

You will be okay. Learn the lessons involved here and move on. 🌻

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