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How to do one-person turn for quadriplegic / trach/vent Pt?

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by allthesmallthings allthesmallthings (Member) Member

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Hi, there.  I need help learning best (or just good!) technique for turning my patients in their beds, especially the trach/vent patients.  Of course, it's just me (one-person turn) turning them.

(Yes, yes, I suck - I've been a nurse for ten years, but worked in hospital, and had second person to help with turning patients in bed for incontinence/bed baths/putting onto hoyer pads, etc.  Somehow, I did not learn well the technique, back in nursing school, and it shows! I'm inefficient and awkward at turning my quadriplegic patients by myself, and I'm genuinely uncomfortable turning the quadriplegic trach/vent patients, afraid that I'm going to pull on their vent tubing and pull out their trachs. I wind up having to turn my patients multiple times to get sheets/pants/diapers/hoyer slings underneath them correctly, and I take forever to get things done with them.)  

Anyway, I want to not suck at it anymore. I've watched youtube videos/nursing education videos, but these don't show quadriplegic patients, or total-care trach/vent patients, or one person doing turns on these types of patients. They show two people turning a "patient" who's about 30 years old and assists in her own turn. Really??

Please help!  Thanks. 

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Kitiger has 40 years experience as a RN and specializes in Private Duty Pediatrics.

1 Follower; 937 Posts; 18,774 Profile Views

The vent circuit can be attached to the person by using a flexible elastic belt that goes around the person's chest with a Velcro attachment to hold the vent. (See image). A cheap one can be made by attaching Velcro to the person's shirt using a clip, and then using the Velcro to wrap around the circuit.

There is also a device to hold the vent circuit to the trach ties, preventing it from disconnecting at the trach.

It is easier to turn the person away from you to position the diapers/slings, etc.. (That way, you can better see what you're doing to position things.)

Keep the vent circuit clipped to his chest, and it should stay comfortable. Flex the hip/knee that is closest to you, then roll his hip away from you. Pay attention to how far under the hip the diaper, etc., needs to go in order for it to be right when you roll him back onto his back. Getting the sheets/pants/diapers/hoyer slings underneath the person and positioned correctly will come with time.

You can do this!  :up:

https://www.google.com/search?q=vent+circuit+holder&rlz=1C1NDCM_enUS718US718&sxsrf=ACYBGNT867cIREjjeknwL26OyRf-kOcNIA:1568685165286&tbm=isch&source=iu&ictx=1&fir=arYq8FssmG6CBM%3A%2C0hlWFzuICPe2cM%2C_&vet=1&usg=AI4_-kRjh9dkWH2zBbRs0NYcPhUjpmK6hg&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwi276nQ39bkAhWJna0KHa8CDdwQ9QEwA3oECAkQCQ#imgrc=arYq8FssmG6CBM:

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Kitiger has 40 years experience as a RN and specializes in Private Duty Pediatrics.

1 Follower; 937 Posts; 18,774 Profile Views

The vent circuit can be attached to the person by using a flexible elastic belt that goes around the person's chest with a Velcro attachment to hold the vent. (See image). A cheap one can be made by attaching Velcro to the person's shirt using a clip, and then using the Velcro to wrap around the circuit.

There is also a device to hold the vent circuit to the trach ties, preventing it from disconnecting at the trach.

It is easier to turn the person away from you to position the diapers/slings, etc.. Keep the vent circuit clipped to his chest, and it should stay comfortable. Pay attention to how far under the hip the diaper, etc., needs to go in order for it to be right when you roll him back onto his back. Getting the sheets/pants/diapers/hoyer slings underneath the person and positioned correctly will come with time.

You can do this!  :up:

https://www.blowoutmedical.com/pediatric-vent-circuit-anti-disconnect-device-905d.html?utm_source=google&utm_medium=base&utm_campaign=products&feed_special=google&gclid=CjwKCAjw5fzrBRASEiwAD2OSV1bN-9b500DonS5Csz1e1Riv6CuhG8P7Y8KI2PffJS0daPZjwyYnyRoCFK8QAvD_BwE

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NutmeggeRN has 25 years experience as a BSN and specializes in kids.

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I have nothing re the vent but turning a person alone is not easy but can be done. You definitely need a sheet that goes across the middle of the bed (we call them a draw sheet)  Roll the sheet up from the outside toward the patiemt and use the sheet to help give you leverege to roll th e person away from you.

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canoehead has 30 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in ER.

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I would recommend asking your management for a physio inservice on the best ways to move patients. Physio did that for my nursing school class, and it has saved me so much pain. I'm thirty years in to nursing without a back injury, and not in shape by any measurement, but I'm told I'm a good lifter.

The main point is to use your body weight as a counter balance to the turn or lift. So you've got a sheet under them, you don't use your arms to pull, you hold with your arms, and lean back to pull with your body weight. Moving someone up in the bed, you lift up vertically, then move your whole body towards the head of the bed, not trying to move your arms alone.

Very hard to explain verbally...like I said, physio will know, and if you don't get an inservice, it would be worth paying for a session privately, IMO.

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