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How do NPs use statistics in their practice?

Posted
nikkid973 nikkid973 (New) New

Hi,

I am hoping some of you may have some insight-I am doing some research for my biostatistics class and was wondering how NPs use statistics in everyday practice. The obvious answer is evidenced -based practice, but I would love some input or new perspectives! If you have something to add please take a minute and give me your thoughts, I really appreciate it! Thanks

traumaRUs, MSN, APRN, CNS

Specializes in Nephrology, Cardiology, ER, ICU. Has 27 years experience.

I use statistics with regards to reimbursement. My pts lab values are a predictor of mortality and factor into reimbursement with the Medicare bundle for dialysis patients.

juan de la cruz, MSN, RN, NP

Specializes in APRN, Adult Critical Care, General Cardiology. Has 27 years experience.

Few ways we use statistics in critical care is in terms of measuring outcomes. Reimbursement is increasingly tied to quality nowadays so we do concern ourselves with our rates of Central Line Associated Bloodstream Infections, Catheter-related Urinary Tract Infections, Compliance with Sepsis Bundles, Ventilator Associated Pneumonias, etc. to make sure we are way below national numbers.

BostonFNP, APRN

Specializes in Adult Internal Medicine. Has 10 years experience.

For me the most important use of statistics is being able to critically read the literature. Take for example the recent publication regarding sitagliptin cardiovascular outcomes and what it really means for practice....

PG2018

Specializes in Outpatient Psychiatry.

I agree with BostonFNP. It helps to understand the literature. Beyond that, we've got a "quality" person 300 miles away that crunches numbers for us and generates lovely reports that make for great conversation and comparison in staff meetings.

In all seriousness, it really does help in understanding literature.

juan de la cruz, MSN, RN, NP

Specializes in APRN, Adult Critical Care, General Cardiology. Has 27 years experience.

I understand how important it is to critically evaluate research output in healthcare as part of evidence-based practice but I thought the OP was asking for ways NP's use statistics other than the "obvious answer" of evidence-based practice.

penniv

Has 13 years experience.

I personally catch myself saying "statistically speaking, you're more likely to..." to my patients. In that sense I am referring to how they compare to the larger volume of patients I see with same condition.

PG2018

Specializes in Outpatient Psychiatry.

I understand how important it is to critically evaluate research output in healthcare as part of evidence-based practice but I thought the OP was asking for ways NP's use statistics other than the "obvious answer" of evidence-based practice.

You're right, Juan, but I can't think of a way me or my colleague's use statistics so I offered the only answer my practice setting has.

Mavrick, BSN, RN

Specializes in 15 years in ICU, 22 years in PACU. Has 30 years experience.

The research model will take data from a smaller sample to infer data about a population. (i.e. In a sample of 1000 people, 900 passed the NCLEX on their first attempt, thus most people pass on their first attempt.)

In practice, many times we use statistics to take data from a larger sample and use it in the smallest population. (i.e. In most people this medication works to lower blood pressure with minimal side effects, let's try it on you.)

Meh, perhaps not so new. Just some thoughts.

Edited by Mavrick

IsabelK

Specializes in Internal Medicine, Geriatric Medicine. Has 12 years experience.

I use statistics every day when I evaluate new guidelines, read studies, etc. I may not generate the statistics but I do need to understand them. They have been invaluable.