How do I know nursing is right for me?

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I am looking for some advice. I am a 32 year old stay at home mom (previously a bank/financial manager.) I have always been interested in the medical field and I now have an opportunity to explore that. I am taking my pre req classes now and plan to start nursing school next fall. Because I don't know much about the medical industry I have done some shadowing. First on the med/surg floor. That was a terrible experience for me and I could never see myself working there. Then on the mother baby unit and that was amazing! I watched several births and a c section, however I then got scared not knowing how I would handle the emotions of a child who didn't make it. Are these fears normal? i have also been considering dental hygiene or physical therapist asst. i don't have time to change my mind later, it is now or never for me so I have to make the right decision. Thanks in advance for any advise!

SummerWertz

60 Posts

I work with an older nurse who left the business field and went to nursing school. She absolutely loves it. I've shadowed in various departments and I have never disliked a department, though I have liked some more than others. My favorite department that I have shadowed in was the ER. Down there you see interesting things, and you're always doing something. Cardiovascular Tower was really nice, too. But it's a lot more tame and you mostly focus on patient relations vs nurse operations imo. The great thing about the medical field is that it's so varied that you could find a place that fits you. You'll see and do some crazy things as a nurse. If you want something a bit more tame, you could always be a nurse in a doctor's office or a dental hygienist like you said. Try to find your fit.

RNsRWe, ASN, RN

4 Articles; 10,428 Posts

Become a CNA. Many schools require this anyway, so it might not be an extra step.

Working as an aide in the hospital would get your feet wet, get you to work in various areas so maybe you'd have a clue what nursing is about. Not a BIG one, but a clue nonetheless. Know that in nursing school you will work in all the various areas you described; some you will like, some not. But knowing right now what you will and will not enjoy later? Not realistic. And your shadowing was probably only one day. Your interests change as your knowledge base changes; you might be surprised at where you find your niche. For me, I "knew" there was no way I was going to like working Med-Surg, based on the experience I had while in nursing school. Turned out the first job I had was on Med-Surg, and I LOVED it. Not most of nursing life in the hospital, lol, but the kind of nursing done there was totally "my thing". But if you asked me whether I wanted to work there if I had only just shadowed? NO FREAKIN' WAY.

Goes to show ya :)

I honestly feel that nurses become nurses for a specific reason. For me, my mother and father passed...I'm only 22 and it's a different world without them. As my mother was a nurse, my father a respiratory therapist I feel destined to be someone amazing. Going through cancer with my father, observing everything it really hits you. I can remember one male nurse that really stood out, telling my father something's I will never forget. Even with my mother, I was quite young but she was a nurse herself and it inspires me. Right now in my life though, I feel stuck and so many emotions that linger...I just need a break through in some way. In life, you get one chance...what is your greatest passion?

RNsRWe, ASN, RN

4 Articles; 10,428 Posts

If you want something a bit more tame, you could always be a nurse in a doctor's office .....

I'd caution against anyone entering an RN program with this in mind. Very few medical offices require RNs nowadays; they have been primarily replaced with LPNs and the LPNs are replaced with MAs. And those RNs in the doc office setting typically have a bushel of experience to draw from. Not saying it isn't possible, but the image of "I'm going to go to school to be an RN and work in a doctor's office" just isn't realistic.

So are you saying just a 2 year degree isn't going to cut it? I mean it would make more sense getting a B.A...yes?

Stephalump

2,723 Posts

Specializes in Forensic Psych. Has 2 years experience.

I agree. Work as a CNA! But in the end, much like most careers, sometimes all you can do is jump in and see what happens. If you start nursing school and hate it, there's no shame in leaving. If you finish and start in a speciality that ends up not being for you, there's no shame in trying something else!

Mandy0728

578 Posts

I honestly feel that nurses become nurses for a specific reason. For me' date=' my mother and father passed...I'm only 22 and it's a different world without them. As my mother was a nurse, my father a respiratory therapist I feel destined to be someone amazing. Going through cancer with my father, observing everything it really hits you. I can remember one male nurse that really stood out, telling my father something's I will never forget. Even with my mother, I was quite young but she was a nurse herself and it inspires me. Right now in my life though, I feel stuck and so many emotions that linger...I just need a break through in some way. In life, you get one chance...what is your greatest passion?[/quote']

Wow, you and I have parallel lives. I'm very sorry for your losses. My father passed when I was 15 from COPD and my mother passed when I was 21 from breast cancer. My mother had this one nurse that stuck out. She went above and beyond, knew all my family by name & just showed true compassion. That was the moment in my life that lead me to nursing. I knew I wanted to make people feel the way that she made my family and I felt.

Specializes in Pediatrics, Emergency, Trauma. Has 18 years experience.
So are you saying just a 2 year degree isn't going to cut it? I mean it would make more sense getting a B.A...yes?

^ It would make more sense to obtain your BSN as an entry level of practice as more hospitals are gearing towards hiring bachelor prepared nurses, as well as if you have a desire to obtain a graduate degree in nursing. It depends on your area as well, however, if you decide to travel, you may be interested in a region that prefers BSN-prepared nurses. Research and make the best choice for you :)

That's awesome....and I'm sorry to hear about your mother and father as well. It's really insane how life can change so fast. We can live now in memory for them!