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How do I deal with this patient's family members?

Home Health   (13,117 Views 111 Comments)
by morango576 morango576 (Member)

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One of the reasons it is important to keep records for yourself is that employers have been known to cause documentation to "disappear". If the office copy of documentation has "disappeared", your copy of your side of the story is evidence that you did indeed report as required.

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Indeed.

Courts are not likely to take your spoken account seriously.

If you have detailed and dated written notes the courts WILL take that seriously. Especially as time passes because there is no loss of memory or possible error in your story.

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muffin7 specializes in OR, HH.

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Morango,

You are not crazy. Don't let anyone make you feel this way.

No one can make you feel anyway that you don't want to feel.

You are just doing your job. Now, it has come to this, and you are not returning to this job. If anything happens to the patient you have your documentation. Continue to be strong for yourself, if not for yourself, please advocate for your patient

As far as asking for help in the breakroom...you did what you should have done...You were relying on others RNs, etc (as we all do when we are learning) to inform you.

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55 Posts; 1,052 Profile Views

oh... I see.

Like I said, I'm new in all this. Learning.

You just made me think of something. At the bottom of my daily chart, there is a blank spot there that asks if there is any change in client's condition. One time, I guess my 2nd or 3rd week at the agency, I wrote down that my cliet was very confused one day and that I talked to my RN supervisor over the phone to inform her. I got chewed out by the office manager because I wrote it down on the daily chart, although it specifically said to if any changes. I asked why. The manager said "The RN doesn't want anything written in there. If you need to report something, you can call her and talk to her directly". Thought it was weird... how is she really going to remember what I told her? And, if somethign comes up in the future, how can I prove that this issue was addressed to them?

See... now I understood where you are going with this. It's a good point I had not thought about.

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55 Posts; 1,052 Profile Views

Atheos has scared me now. Oh gosh. I feel like a fool for not writing my own stuff down.

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Now don't panic. Just start going back in time and write down what you can remember. And be scrupulous about notes to yourself from here on out. This is a good learning experience for you. And don't take any poop from those people tomorrow. You are doing the right thing by removing yourself from the case. Maybe, because you talked to that other lady, something will finally get done for the poor client. You probably did good without even knowing it! At least we can hope so, for the client's sake!

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Atheos has scared me now. Oh gosh. I feel like a fool for not writing my own stuff down.

Didn't mean to scare you.

Just something I learned in my 6th week of being a CNA...

The facility/organization/employer WILL try to sell you out. The only thing that saved me is that about 12 different CNAs on different shifts told the same story and named the same nurses.

The best advice a state inspector told me was document EVERYTHING.

You are your only protection.

I'd still call APS if I were you. You WON'T get in trouble and they most likely WILL go out and investigate both the family AND the HH agency. You will find that APS people are generally very nice. I've seen them go after abusers like wild dogs seeing meat but I've never seen them go after someone that reported something. Even later.

Plus, in your state you may be mandated by law to report it and if you don't you could possibly get in trouble.

In my state not reporting can result in jail and/or fines + loss of license.

Better to report and them not investigate than the alternative.

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muffin7 specializes in OR, HH.

193 Posts; 4,480 Profile Views

So from this point on...... document not only what you said, but also the response, and who you spoke to, etc.

Relax and try to think... look at a calendar to help you document.

I am not saying that anything, but you never know what will come of this mess ...but you will have your own records if needed. Be sure to write down the date, time and who you spoke to (from your office) and of course the conversation...

Hang in there!

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55 Posts; 1,052 Profile Views

I definitely will.

I am more exhausted of this whole thing than anything else. I know tomorrow I will have to speak with either this lady "supervisor over everyone", or my office manager. Either tomorrow or Friday. All I wanted is for her to stop pushing me and now she's probably going to chew me out for not going tomorrow, blahblahblah...

Many things are going through my mind right now...

I'm so tired.

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And the admonition to you about noting in your daily note that you informed the RN supervisor about a change of condition-----hogwash. You were correct in what you did. Never do otherwise. That is your job to write that down in that space. If they want more detail, like things you would say differently from the patient chart copy; you write that down in what is called a "communication note" or an "incident report". If you were not calling your supervisor and documenting changes in condition on your daily note, you would be hanging yourself out to dry. Unfortunately, you might find it easier to sleep at night with an employer who takes documentation and patient/employee safety more seriously. Good luck.

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55 Posts; 1,052 Profile Views

will have to go to bed and try calming down...

I'm just thinking how well my patient and I got along and how much I helped her, I'm sure I did. She always appreciated me.

Maybe if I keep thinking of this positive aspect of the situation, I can cope better.

Thanks to you all, you've been great!!! will let you guys know what happens tomorrow

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muffin7 specializes in OR, HH.

193 Posts; 4,480 Profile Views

Hi Morango,

I hadn't seen Atheos reply until right now.

Don't be nervous. You have been reporting what has happened about your patient to your supervisor, etc. As a precautionary, you will be reporting to an agency (whatever it is to protect your patient) tomorrow. You have nothing to be worried about. You will be reporting bruises to them and you will think back to anything else that you can at this time. Your patient is ok at the moment and you want her to stay that way.

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