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  1. how do i know that this is a 2 part question?

    The client's K+ is 2.0 mEq/dl and the physician orders a potassium bolus of 40 mEq of KCl in 200 ml of NS to be delivered at a rate of 10 mEq/hr. What is the drip rate in microdrops? (Ideal, deliver on a pump.)


    thank you
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    About mRpeNa

    Joined: Sep '08; Posts: 215; Likes: 17
    from US
    Specialty: LTC

    7 Comments

  3. by   mRpeNa
    DISREGARD, IDEAL ON A PUMP ...
    CAN SOMEONE EXPLAIN THIS TO ME
    the answer is this:

    (step1)200ml/40mEq*10mEq/1=2000/40= 50ml

    (step 2) 50ml*60gtt/60min= 50ml

    WHY WOULDN'T I USE 200ML*60/60MIN=
    Last edit by mRpeNa on May 29, '09
  4. by   morte
    Quote from goingalltheway
    how do i know that this is a 2 part question?

    The client's K+ is 2.0 mEq/dl and the physician orders a potassium bolus of 40 mEq of KCl in 200 ml of NS to be delivered at a rate of 10 mEq/hr. What is the drip rate in microdrops? (Ideal, deliver on a pump.)


    thank you
    because you need to answer one question before you can go on to the next....
    40mEq/200 : 10 mEq/1= x .....now you need to determine the RATE
    you want to deliver 50 ml/hour there are 60 gtts per ml so 50 gtts/min
  5. by   Daytonite
    the client's k+ is 2.0 meq/dl and the physician orders a potassium bolus of 40 meq of kcl in 200 ml of ns to be delivered at a rate of 10 meq/hr. what is the drip rate in microdrops? (ideal, deliver on a pump.)
    whatever this 2-part business is, i can see from several of the questions you have posted that it is confusing you. i work problems by first identifying the dose desired, the dose on hand and then solving for the amount to give. all problems, even the iv problems, can be solved this way. then i use dimensional analysis, or factor labeling, which merely means manipulating the terms of the equation that i set up to come out with an answer that contains the labels i want on the final answer which is often a fraction with a numerator and denominator. if you write these equations below out as fractions and cross out the labels (most of them factor out which is what i wanted to happen to them), you will see that what you have left after doing the math (multiplying all the numerators and then multiplying all the denominators)is the answer reduced to an nice even number and the labels i wanted to end up with. i also quickly checked the answers on my calculator using the old dose desired divided by dose on hand multiplied by the amount the dose on hand comes in formula and in 2 seconds had the answer.

    for an answer in microdrops/minutes you must know that microdrop tubing delivers 60 drops/ml: 200 ml/40 meq (dose on hand) x 10 meq/1 hour (dose desired) x 1 hour/60 minutes (conversion factor) x 60 gtts/1 ml (drop factor of iv tubing) = 50 gtts/minute

    for an answer for delivery on a pump you must know that a pump always delivers in ml/hour: 200 ml/40 meq (dose on hand) x 10 meq/1 hour (dose desired) = 50 ml/hour
  6. by   Daytonite
    Quote from goingalltheway
    DISREGARD, IDEAL ON A PUMP ...
    CAN SOMEONE EXPLAIN THIS TO ME
    the answer is this:

    (step1)200ml/40mEq*10mEq/1=2000/40= 50ml

    (step 2) 50ml*60gtt/60min= 50ml

    WHY WOULDN'T I USE 200ML*60/60MIN=
    Are these equations you are making up or are they coming from a workbook?

    I would not solve the problem this way unless that is what your instructors want you to do. If this is something they want you to do, and even I don't understand it, I think you should call the school and ask for a tutor to explain it instead of hoping someone on allnurses knows how to figure it out.
  7. by   mRpeNa
    Sorry to bother you guys....i wont ask anymore questions, daytonite
  8. by   Daytonite
    I not discouraging you from asking questions! I am saying that it is difficult to understand what it is you are asking. Is this coming from a workbook? Is this a specific way your instructors want you to work out the answers to these problems? Can you answer these questions I am asking? I am more than willing to help you out, but I am trying to get on the same wave length as you. Help me understand what it is you are doing because I'm having difficulty understanding what you are doing.
  9. by   cursedandblessed
    I think you're making it harder than it is. Your ultimate answer in this question is drops per minute. Micro gtt tubing is 60 gtt/mL
    we use the means and extremes method.

    40 meq: 200 mL = 10 meq : XmL
    What you have what you want
    (total amt) (amt in an hour)

    1. Multiply your outer two numbers (extremes) 40X
    2. Multiply your middle two numbers (means) 200 * 10= 2000

    40X = 2000 now to find X (mL per hour) divide both sides by 40
    40 40

    X = 50 mL per hour

    To find drops per minute formula is:

    volume to be infused * drop factor
    minutes to be infused

    50 mL * 60 gtt per mL
    60 minutes

    equals 50 gtt/minute

    admittedly there can be easier methods to do this, and some problems can be done in your head, but I've learned that I make fewer mistakes when I just do everything and write it all out. If my way seems too confusing just ignore me-only trying to help and get some practice at the same time.

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