Has this helped you?

  1. Im in my second semester of nursing school, and I'm good at memorizing lab values, etc. but my problem comes when we need to figure out what to do first in a situation, etc. - which is pretty much what NCLEX is from what our teachers are telling us. I was thinking about buying an NCLEX study book and spend a little bit of time every week going over it. I figure since we dont get our tests back, i need something to practice with that will make me think critically - has anyone else done this? has it helped? TIA!
    ShockerGirl
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    About ShockerGirl07

    Joined: Aug '06; Posts: 61; Likes: 5
    Medical Lab Assistant

    13 Comments

  3. by   mom2cka
    I have 2... opened them over the summer, but didn't exactly get too far into them... so far, it seems as though ABCs in terms of priority, safety over comfort... a lot are common sense, but there are some tricky ones, too. I hear the study guides will help me more now (senior year) as things will really start to come together and make more sense.
  4. by   shock-me-sane
    they have been a lifesaver for me. a group of us ask each other questions out of them weekly, argue about the answer and then read the rationale.
    I like Davis.
  5. by   Petite06
    If I had it to do again...I would have bought a couple different NCLEX review books, I would have bought several of the "...made incredibly easy" series and I would have spent at least 30 mins a day going over drug calculations, particularly dimensional analysis.

    Now, I find myself in my final semester having had a two year break in school due to family stuff and I don't feel like I know anything.

    The review books are meant to expose you and to help you learn to critically think. If you are using them throughout your schooling, you will be rewarded on your exams now as well. It will get you in the mindset.

    Good luck.
  6. by   MMARN
    Quote from Petite06
    If I had it to do again...I would have bought a couple different NCLEX review books, I would have bought several of the "...made incredibly easy" series and I would have spent at least 30 mins a day going over drug calculations, particularly dimensional analysis.

    Now, I find myself in my final semester having had a two year break in school due to family stuff and I don't feel like I know anything.

    The review books are meant to expose you and to help you learn to critically think. If you are using them throughout your schooling, you will be rewarded on your exams now as well. It will get you in the mindset.

    Good luck.
    Absolutely get the "Made Easy" books. They literally make things easier. I use them for fluid and electrolytes, and they have been extremely helpful. I have NCLEX flashcards that are easy and very helpful as well. As for the NCLEX book, I have Saunders.
  7. by   luv2shopp85
    I'm not sure if your nursing school is like mine but after we go through all of our rotations... er/psch, ob/peds, critical care... we take nursing management which will help you with prioritizing and delegating. But no doubt, nclex books will definitely help you. I have the made easy books and they can get pricey if you buy them all from borders, or barnes and nable at the full price when they are brand new. Just look on ebay, amazon, half.com, etc, and you can find them much cheaper. I have Medusrg made easy, diagnostic testts made ieasy, critical care made easy, and iv therapy made easy. They realy help me a lot when I have trouble understanding something from my notes and then the book doesn't help to clarify it for me.
  8. by   fleur-de-lis
    In fundamentals we learned the ABC's for prioritizing, not just airway, breathing, circulation, but the entire alphabet A-Z. This helps me alot. I don't have it in front of me, but if anyone wants I can dig it up and post it. Not sure if it is a standard thing or something my instructor came up with!
  9. by   BoonersmomRN
    I use them. I have both Saunders and Kaplan. I also have the Prentice Hall review series and the Made Easy! book for F+E. I love them.
  10. by   WDWpixieRN
    Quote from fleur-de-lis
    In fundamentals we learned the ABC's for prioritizing, not just airway, breathing, circulation, but the entire alphabet A-Z. This helps me alot. I don't have it in front of me, but if anyone wants I can dig it up and post it. Not sure if it is a standard thing or something my instructor came up with!
    Right now, I am feeling like I could use all the help I can get....2 lab checkoffs next week and our first test. I'm in a panic!!

    Thanks!
  11. by   fleur-de-lis
    Ok, I was thinking there was more letters than this, but here it is:

    A Airway
    B Breathing
    C Circulation
    D Drugs (pass meds)
    E Expose (um, I don't remember what this refered
    to, oopsey!)
    F Flip (turn q 2 hrs if pt cannot do it)
    G Get Vital Signs
    H Head-toe
    I Inspection

    Like I said, I thought it kept going, but I can't find more. I'll keep looking. Happy studying!
  12. by   shellsgogreen
    i also use nclex books to study with....especially around test time... the mosby illustrated study guide, by zerwekh is awesome
  13. by   luv2shopp85
    Quote from fleur-de-lis
    Ok, I was thinking there was more letters than this, but here it is:

    A Airway
    B Breathing
    C Circulation
    D Drugs (pass meds)
    E Expose (um, I don't remember what this refered
    to, oopsey!)
    F Flip (turn q 2 hrs if pt cannot do it)
    G Get Vital Signs
    H Head-toe
    I Inspection

    Like I said, I thought it kept going, but I can't find more. I'll keep looking. Happy studying!

    Expose is for Trauma, or when you're in the ER. We just learned this in class a few days ago. You want to expose the wound to see what it looks liek and get the person out of their normal clothes into a hospital gown. Or you want to expose the entire body to find more wounds than just the one that is blatantly obvious.

    Your extended ABC's sounds exactly like the trauama/ER assessment we were just taught.
  14. by   fleur-de-lis
    Quote from luv2shopp85
    Expose is for Trauma, or when you're in the ER. We just learned this in class a few days ago. You want to expose the wound to see what it looks liek and get the person out of their normal clothes into a hospital gown. Or you want to expose the entire body to find more wounds than just the one that is blatantly obvious.

    Your extended ABC's sounds exactly like the trauama/ER assessment we were just taught.
    Yup, thats it, I just could not remember it at that moment. That makes sense that it is for trauma, since my fundamentals instructor is a critical care nurse! He just introduced it to us early! Thanks for the reminder! :wink2:

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