What have other nurses done that have freaked you out? - page 62

What have other peers done intentional/unintentional to freak you out? Good or bad. Happy or sad. On my FIRST day as an LVN, (LTC) a res was screaming in her room as I was walking out to leave. I... Read More

  1. by   bustthewave
    So I'm starting the nursing program right now. I can relate to some of these stories as I work as a vet-tech, they are just less dramatic and involve animals (like a tech doing kennels on a weekend and forgetting completely about a cat we were keeping in a cage in the closet... it's an isolation closet for animals that don't socialize well or are being isolated from other animals... so the cat went 3 days without food or water).

    But what really scares me is this - a lot of these stories (certainly not all) seem like things that really could happen to anyone who forgets that they are dealing with human lives and just how important their job is. I've only had my job for 2 months, and I remind myself every time I go in that I am dealing with people's pets, but... I know there will be a day I go into work, where I have spent all night studying for some practical, my mind will be elsewhere, and open the door for a big mistake that takes such a little action, like mis-reading a label on some meds.

    I'm just wondering, how can I not be the nurse who ever has a day like that? That's what scares me the most about nursing, those days I stop thinking of patients as people, and stop thinking my job deserves my full attention.
  2. by   pistolchick
    Omigosh. To the crushed percocet/water/central line nurse... did the patient die??
  3. by   Bezoars
    Here is the worst thing I heard of a nurse doing... My favorite instructor in school told of an incident when she used to work in ICU... A nurse had pushed Malox through a peripheral IV. Needless to say, when it was discovered what had happened, they immidiately transported the patient to the ICU and she said she just remembers the "terror on their faces" as staff and pt come rushing through the ICU door telling of what happened. The pts lungs became coated with it and pt died from the error.
  4. by   April, RN
    I've had a couple of incidents where I picked up a patient on an insulin gtt with NO sugar source! Very scary to think of what could have happened if those situations weren't caught in time...
  5. by   Meba
    Quote from guy_nurse
    On my first day of clinical rotations, I witnessed the (my) charge nurse administer a flu shot to a patient being discharged. She did not wash her hands, she wiped the pt with an alcohol pad, injected (don't think that she aspirated), picked up the same alcohol pad (from the bed, which is where she dropped it originally) and gave the injection site one swipe with it. Never put on a glove! Never washed her hands before or after.
    T
    No biggie right? Well to us (2 students, first day on the unit), this procedure has been beaten into our heads for like 2 months. Not to mention this hospital did not do well with their JCAHO evaluation for this exact type of thing.
    he most up to date guidelines state that one does not aspirate when giving immunizations.

    I don't wear gloves while giving immunizations, I do when starting IVs or drawing blood and I always wash my hands. Studies have shown that wiping down with alcohol is more or less useless. I have had one of my docs who didn't want an alcohol swab. Also, why would anyone swipe the injection site with alcohol? It would just sting. I apply pressure to the site briefly with a cotton ball or a 2x2 gauze.
  6. by   Meba
    Quote from tvccrn
    Why is that such a bad thing? Now the standard is NS, but quite a few years ago, you wouldn't have heard of blood hung with anything EXCEPT D5.

    I have been a nurse for 30 odd years and blood products were always hung with NS- never D5.
  7. by   Meba
    Quote from hijabiRN
    We had a nurse that charted "pt pitched a fit when I put her IV in".
    I had a doctor write an order for a combative/disoriented COPD pt "Obtain exorcist stat"
  8. by   GM2RN
    Quote from Meba
    he most up to date guidelines state that one does not aspirate when giving immunizations.

    I don't wear gloves while giving immunizations, I do when starting IVs or drawing blood and I always wash my hands. Studies have shown that wiping down with alcohol is more or less useless. I have had one of my docs who didn't want an alcohol swab. Also, why would anyone swipe the injection site with alcohol? It would just sting. I apply pressure to the site briefly with a cotton ball or a 2x2 gauze.

    What studies? There's a proper way to do it and one swipe is not it. If using alcohol for IV sites is useless then it's useless to use hand sanitizer. You also need to let the area dry before inserting the needle. Alcohol only stings if it is still wet, which is also why it might be "useless" because it needs to dry before it is effective.
  9. by   GM2RN
    Quote from Meba
    I had a doctor write an order for a combative/disoriented COPD pt "Obtain exorcist stat"

  10. by   Meba
    Quote from GM2RN
    What studies? There's a proper way to do it and one swipe is not it. If using alcohol for IV sites is useless then it's useless to use hand sanitizer. You also need to let the area dry before inserting the needle. Alcohol only stings if it is still wet, which is also why it might be "useless" because it needs to dry before it is effective.
    I will give you the link for that study. I still do use alcohol however, old habits are hard to break. Obviously one has to let the alcohol dry before injecting.
  11. by   handyrn
    Hey! I would ask if this was me, but I wasn't giving her a shower. Yep, I did the same thing. I was a young CNA, took a brand new patient to the br, then went and asked the nurse if the patient was a hermorphadite. (we used that word back in those days. Not politically correct now.) The nurse came and checked it out and boy did she laugh at me!

    Ok, not sure how this ended up here, thought I was replying with a link to a post on a previous page. Oh well, you get the point anyway.
  12. by   Quark09
    I was floating to LTC and had a pt, 100 years old (1 assist, no hearing aids, occasionally needed a walker... yes, she was 100 years old) who was in isolation. She had a colostomy, MRSA in urine and VRE in stool (they were waiting on a sputum to come back as well). She toileted by herself but tended to dribble; her colostomy was also ready to be changed. I entered the room gowned, gloved, booties on shoes (dribbles) and with the mask - she'd just gotten off the toilet, had dribbled urine on the way back to her bed and her bag was leaking. On this unit, each res room had its own laundry bag and they had their own laundry at the end of one hall. Out of habit I grabbed plastic garbage bags to put the soiled clothing into before placing in a purple (contaminated) laundry bag. As I finished applying the new colostomy bag and bagging the soiled clothing, the pt's CNA walked into the room: no gown, mask, booties, NADA. She goes "Did you put her clothes in plastic bags?" I replied that I had. She then walked through the urine dribbles on the floor I hadn't yet cleaned up (NO BOOTIES!!) reached into the purple bag, no gloves, unties the plastic bags and uses her hands to pull out the contaminated clothing and drop it back into the purple bag. Misreading my look of disbelief, she said "Oh, the laundry lady on this floor hates it when you double bag stuff." Then she started to walk out of the room without washing her hands. I asked her to come back in and do so, and she said "Oh, just a sec" and pulled her own pretty little bottle of scented hand sanitizer out of her pocket, made a big show of rubbing it into her hands, dropped the bottle back into her scrub pocket and started to leave the room again. When I again stopped her, she actually rolled her eyes and said "Now what?!?" I informed her that first, the outside of her bottle, while pretty, was now contaminated, and next, after we'd taken care of her shoes, we needed to meet with her charge nurse and discuss sanitation and contamination practices.

    The sad thing was, she would probably have gone right into another patient's room without a thought. I shuddered every time I'd see her at Walmart after that (yes, in her work scrubs, touching everything).
  13. by   britgirl37
    Just showed this site to a colleague and she shared this story with me.......... a nurse she worked with some years ago gave 30 Meq liquid potassium - an oral dose through the pt's cental line. The pt coded but was brought back successfully. 6 hrs later she gave the second dose.... you guessed it, through the central line again. The pt coded but sadly did not make this time. Not sure if this RN still has a license.....

close