How much notice when quitting a per diem job?

  1. I think this should be a pretty simple question. How much notice should I give before I quit a per diem job? I took job with a company that is like a sinking boat in flames. I think it's a very bad place to start and I never should have taken the job, but live and learn.

    I told the DoN I wanted to quit last week, she said give it another week. I get the impression that some people just say "I quit," and walk out the door. I don't intend to put this job on the resume or to use the DoN as a reference, and I don't want to be a jerk. But I want out. What do I owe them, if anything?

    Thanks.
  2. Visit hotflashion profile page

    About hotflashion, BSN, RN

    Joined: Oct '09; Posts: 282; Likes: 174
    from US
    Specialty: 3 year(s) of experience in Foot care

    9 Comments

  3. by   chloecatrn
    You need to put this job on your resume, and on every application that you fill out. Employers can and will fire you if they find that you've been dishonest about your employment history. It's actually standard verbage on any application form... when you sign, you're saying that you've filled out your form completely accurately to the best of your knowledge.

    Give two weeks. Two weeks is standard, and doesn't leave them up the proverbial creek without a paddle. They were good enough to hire you, and whether or not the company's a hot mess, you've got to be professional about leaving.
  4. by   Jolie
    What does the employee handbook say regarding notice of resignation? The length of notice usually does not change because one is per diem. If it's 2 weeks for professional positions, that includes full-time, part-time and per diem.
  5. by   hotflashion
    There is no employee handbook.
  6. by   Meriwhen
    Unless there's an official policy dictating otherwise, you can never go wrong with giving two weeks' notice.

    Besides, sinking ship or not, you don't want to burn any bridges when leaving because you never know if you'll end up back there...or if you'll be working with/for former staff at another facility.
  7. by   mamamerlee
    Two weeks is appropriate, or the length of a schedule, prior to the next schedule.

    Never burn bridges.
  8. by   hotflashion
    I understand the not burning bridges part. And I do not want to cause undue stress to the staff already there. But I've only been there two weeks, this is my first job, and I'm still in "training". The training is minimal to non-existent, and the organization is unstable and with, um, no organization. There are two units; one I feel that I can cope with just barely, and be safe. The other, not. It is too chaotic and anxiety producing. Staff routinely work double shifts and relatives of staff come in to do maintenance work. I understand the hard work part, but if all of nursing is done under such rocky conditions, this career isn't for me.
  9. by   chloecatrn
    Quote from hotflashion
    I understand the hard work part, but if all of nursing is done under such rocky conditions, this career isn't for me.
    All of nursing isn't done under such rocky conditions. However, in order to have the opportunity to figure that out, you'll have to give two weeks notice. The market is so tight right now that potential employers really have their pick of who to hire, and not being rehirable by your former employer doesn't look so good for you. Two weeks. I promise. If you can't handle the working conditions, do it tomorrow. But two weeks.
  10. by   Meriwhen
    Quote from chloecatrn
    All of nursing isn't done under such rocky conditions. However, in order to have the opportunity to figure that out, you'll have to give two weeks notice. The market is so tight right now that potential employers really have their pick of who to hire, and not being rehirable by your former employer doesn't look so good for you. Two weeks. I promise. If you can't handle the working conditions, do it tomorrow. But two weeks.
    Agreed. The job market is tight as it is, and even worse if you're a new grad. Don't damage your professional reputation if you can help it.

    OP: really try to stick the 2 weeks out if you can. Since you're per diem, just work the minimum number of shifts required.
  11. by   hotflashion
    The end of the story:

    I gave my two weeks. I stuck it out. It was hell. I went back last night to say goodbye to the residents and it was heart wrenching. I heard the DoN was fired/quit a couple days after my last day. This was an awful terrible experience.

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