Does this bother anyone else? - page 5

I was just reading a post in another thread and came across the following statement that alarmed me: "i wish that i had chosen nursing in the first place because i need a recession Proof career". ... Read More

  1. by   camomile7
    I have to agree with you. All too often I go into work, I am a RN in an ICU, and there are coworkers who are just not in it for what I believe nursing to be, an altruistic profession! The job is way too hard to be in it otherwise. Anyone who spends the time in nursing school and then as a nurse must understand to be a nurse, to simply have a job, is disheartening to those of us in the profession whom strive to take an altruistic & humanistic approach to our careers. There are a lot of ethical responsibilities in being a nurse and this must be considered by one before joining the ranks of us. This is a serious deal! A patient and their families are counting on us to help them! They are most vulnerable in there times of need and cannot be treated anyway other than humane. People are not machines and they need to be talked to and explained things. A nurse needs to care about their patients! End of story!
  2. by   catshowlady
    Being an ethical, humanistic, responsible, caring nurse and being a person who needs to have a job/paycheck to pay the bills - why do some of you think these two things are mutually exclusive???? Some of you seem to be advocating an opinion that you must be one or the other; you cannot be both. Why not?
  3. by   LilPeonNo1
    I sometimes think, that nurses who aren't in it as a "calling"; they don't have the passion for nursing as many do, are often better nurses because of it. That may sound strange, but hear me out. Those nurses who came into the profession for practical reasons, don't have the emotional ties to the job and usually strictly look at their work from an objective viewpoint. By not allowing their emotions to get in the way of their work, they are able to complete tasks sometimes more efficiently and in greater detail. I'm not saying they act like robots, but when you're in this profession because of moral or ethical reasoning, you tend to be more people oriented and feel for others needs rather than your own. That in itself is commendable, but in situations where you have to be hard as nails, like calling family members in to tell them their loved one is actively dying, or performing a procedure/treatment you know is causing your patient excrutiating pain, you might want someone who isn't going to crack under the pressure. Its not that those who have that compassion blubber and cry with every little thing, but getting emotional over a dying patient could hinder your performance in doing what is needed at the time.
  4. by   cardiacRN2006
    Quote from camomile7
    There are a lot of ethical responsibilities in being a nurse and this must be considered by one before joining the ranks of us. This is a serious deal! A patient and their families are counting on us to help them! They are most vulnerable in there times of need and cannot be treated anyway other than humane. People are not machines and they need to be talked to and explained things. A nurse needs to care about their patients! End of story!
    Whew! That's a lot of exclaimation points....


    But, to counter your post...

    I didn't come across one thing in your post that I don't do-well. I know how to explain things to my patients. Humanely even! Go figure!

    And I care for my patients! Yes, I really do.

    Nursing isn't my calling. Nursing isn't my passion.


    And yet, somehow, someway, I do a really, really kick butt job at it.


    I wonder why that is.......Oh yeah, it's because it doesn't matter WHY we got into this field.


    So everyone needs to let it go. Get over it. Just because you entered this field for one reason doean't mean it's the ONLY good reason.




    You know, if everyone just worried about themselves, instead of other people, then we wouldn't have to worry about other people.

    Just a thought.
  5. by   AZ_LPN_8_26_13
    Quote from LilPeonNo1
    I sometimes think, that nurses who aren't in it as a "calling"; they don't have the passion for nursing as many do, are often better nurses because of it. That may sound strange, but hear me out. Those nurses who came into the profession for practical reasons, don't have the emotional ties to the job and usually strictly look at their work from an objective viewpoint. By not allowing their emotions to get in the way of their work, they are able to complete tasks sometimes more efficiently and in greater detail. I'm not saying they act like robots, but when you're in this profession because of moral or ethical reasoning, you tend to be more people oriented and feel for others needs rather than your own. That in itself is commendable, but in situations where you have to be hard as nails, like calling family members in to tell them their loved one is actively dying, or performing a procedure/treatment you know is causing your patient excrutiating pain, you might want someone who isn't going to crack under the pressure. Its not that those who have that compassion blubber and cry with every little thing, but getting emotional over a dying patient could hinder your performance in doing what is needed at the time.
    A "calling" and a "passion" for something aren't necessarily the same thing. I look back on my life and all of the sum of my experiences, and in doing that, plus a lot of prayer, yes, I honestly believe that this is what I'm being called to do. It's not my call either. Do I have "a passion" for it? To be honest - no. I'm approaching it totally matter-of-factly and objectively, and with my eyes wide open. And yes, money is important, especially if you have a family at home to support as I do. My belief as a Christian is that God isn't going to give you something to do and then pull the rug out from under you. But you are still the one who has to make the thing go, whatever it might be, and you will still have the ups and downs. The reply earlier that mentioned that people go into these things for a mix of reasons is right...... When everything is said and done, I think that the reasons why you are there are probably going to be pretty much invisible to the patient - they likely don't care why you are there or what brought you there - they don't really need to know that anyway. All they know is they want the best medical care they can get, and as long as you give it, then it doesn't matter to them how or why you got there.
  6. by   TomCCRN1991
    It is definately not a recession proof job. I was laid off in February after 9 years with that employer. I have 9 years ICU experience and 18 years overall experience. At 45, I have not been able to find a job in ICU anywhere, especially competing with people half my age and almost no experience. I guess they are more gullible and a lot cheaper. Mostly I hear "Do you want to interview for a med surg position on nights?" With the economy on its way south and talk of socialized medicine, I no longer recommend nursing as a good profession to get into.
  7. by   camomile7
    Please let me clarify that to be a nurse, one simply cannot to it for the paycheck alone.
  8. by   barefootlady
    Hello Tom,

    I am so sorry you are finding yourself unemployed. I hope something comes your way soon. Where are you in the country? Is a move possible if needed? I hear Texas, Az, Wy, and Nevada need and want any nurse who can move. Good luck and blessing to you and yours.
  9. by   Multicollinearity
    I have no calling to nursing. In "another life" I might have made an excellent librarian or microbiologist. We have many doors in life and I believe multiple paths coinciding with happenstance. I'm just a thirty-something insurance agent who got burned out selling insurance (fried crispy, dead, caput). The older I got, the less able I was to shovel at clients the crap the insurance companies shoveled at me. I wanted to use my mind, use my interest in science, and do something that helps people - not pressure and sell them on an insurance policy. Being an insurance agent was in direct opposition to my top quality and priority in life, kindness.

    I'm just a few months away from graduating from nursing school, and I have zero regrets. I know in a few years I may post on the board that I'm fried out crispy from hospital work. However, one benefit from years of reading allnurses is that I'm not going into this with rose-colored glasses. I know nurses are weighed down with impossible patient loads and paperwork that can obstruct the care we want to provide. But still, at its core, - it's about caring for people. I know how toxic floor nursing can be, from reading this board, and I'll plan my career accordingly.

    One thing about nursing - there are so many choices if one is willing to continue education and be mobile, geographically. It's rather amazing.
    Last edit by Multicollinearity on May 8, '09
  10. by   AZ_LPN_8_26_13
    ".... I wanted to use my mind, use my interest in science, and do something that helps people - not pressure and sell them on an insurance policy. Being an insurance agent was in direct opposition to my top quality and priority in life, kindness.

    I'm just a few months away from graduating from nursing school, and I have zero regrets. I know in a few years I may post on the board that I'm fried out crispy from hospital work. However, one benefit from years of reading allnurses is that I'm not going into this with rose-colored glasses. I know nurses are weighed down with impossible patient loads and paperwork that can obstruct the care we want to provide. But still, at its core, - it's about caring for people. I know how toxic floor nursing can be, from reading this board, and I'll plan my career accordingly.

    One thing about nursing - there are so many choices if one is willing to continue education and be mobile, geographically. It's rather amazing."

    Well put.... Actually I've always had an interest in science myself, and I've always enjoyed doing things that actually help people. It's a side of me that until now has not really had a means of expression or actualization. Someone other than myself had to give me a bit of a nudge to consider doing this though - I probably wouldn't have considered it on my own .....

    Do I actually have a "passion" for it? Like I mentioned before, no - what I mean is that I have a lot of other things going on, and many other interests besides nursing - it doesn't take up all of my thoughts every waking moment, and I probably won't forsake a lot of the other things in my life that I like doing and am interested in.

    You're right about the opportunities in nursing - sometimes I think that it takes people who are coming from outside of it, and have worked in fields where it's severely limited (I have) to really see and appreciate this. One person told me to learn all you can, get certs in just about everything you can, and keep your options open, and that's what I plan to do....
  11. by   cardiacRN2006
    Quote from camomile7
    Please let me clarify that to be a nurse, one simply cannot to it for the paycheck alone.

    Let me clarify-you're wrong.
    Not only can a nurse be in nursing for the paycheck alone, but they can also be damn good at it too.
  12. by   nursemarion
    I've seen those nurses who are only in it for the paycheck. Yes, they can have great skills, yes they can last. Money is the ultimate motivator for all of us. I would have quit working a million times if I could, if I did not need the paycheck. Being a mother was a bigger motivator to me and how I wanted to stay home and do that! But if I have to work, and I do, I want to be a nurse. I believe it is my calling. Still, I know, other nurses know, and the patients know who really cares and who doesn't. You should hear the comments I have heard form patients when I admit them to home health from the hospital. Oh, they know who cares and who doesn't. They feel it in your words and they appreciate those who really care, who are really dedicated to nursing. The rest of you are just nameless faces in an endless world of pain and suffering that they have experienced. Just as most of the patients are to you.
  13. by   SoundofMusic
    You know, you can always go into nursing for the money, but then become darn good at it and develop "the Passion" as you go. That is sort of what is happening to me. I don't believe any of us, as humans, have this supernnatural passion thing going on anyway. A job is a job - and sadly, I also cannot make enough money doing what I'd REALLY like to do all day long (tend to the garden and raise chickens out in the country), so I have to be a nurse.

    I also, however, also became very burnt out working in a cubicle, staring at a computer all day, sitting on my duff. Nursing keeps me engaged, active, physical, and around people. It's a super career change type move -- and I have always, always been interested in anatomy and how the body works. Was always the kid who joined the science club, loved to be around people, was fascinated with shots, needles, medical equipment, etc. Does that make me Florence? No -- just someone who might be interested in nursing and do well at it.

    Bedside nursing nowadays demands much more than passion -- it demands multiple multi tasking skills, the ability to "get 'er done." You COULD be passionate, but lacking the follow through skills and management ability, good communication skills, etc. necessary to be successful nowadays as a hospital RN.

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