Cpap?

  1. Anybody here have any personal experience with CPAP? I need to know because it's probably in my not-too-distant future........I had an appointment with a sleep specialist yesterday, and he's about 99% sure I have sleep apnea of some sort (I've got a sleep study scheduled in late May) and will need this equipment.

    Now, I've certainly seen CPAP machines before---patients often bring their own from home to use when they're in the hospital---but frankly, how are you supposed to sleep with that mask strapped onto your face and all that air rushing down through your nose and mouth? Does it really help? And are you ever able to stop using it once you start?

    Funny, the things a nurse doesn't know about until she becomes a patient herself.......

    Thanks in advance for sharing any advice or firsthand knowledge!
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    About VivaLasViejas, ASN, RN Guide

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    RN and blogger extraordinaire; from OR , US
    Specialty: 20 year(s) of experience in LTC, assisted living, med-surg, psych

    14 Comments

  3. by   Andie-mom&student
    Hello

    My husband just started using his cpap 2 weeks ago, he has a full face mask. He thought it would be difficult to sleep with it on, but he has never sleep better. It has also been good for me, I actually sleep now. It may take a while to get use to the machine, but it will make a difference.

    Good Luck
  4. by   Wise Woman RN
    Quote from mjlrn97
    Anybody here have any personal experience with CPAP? I need to know because it's probably in my not-too-distant future........I had an appointment with a sleep specialist yesterday, and he's about 99% sure I have sleep apnea of some sort (I've got a sleep study scheduled in late May) and will need this equipment.

    Now, I've certainly seen CPAP machines before---patients often bring their own from home to use when they're in the hospital---but frankly, how are you supposed to sleep with that mask strapped onto your face and all that air rushing down through your nose and mouth? Does it really help? And are you ever able to stop using it once you start?

    Funny, the things a nurse doesn't know about until she becomes a patient herself.......

    Thanks in advance for sharing any advice or firsthand knowledge!
    I sleep with a CPAP... I was severely sleep deprived, it turns out...I also snored like a freight train... Now, my husband can sleep with me, (he says I look like a cute little fighter-jet pilot,) and I wake up without an alarm clock and can work all day without being exhausted... I have a mask that just fits over my nose, so I can bury my face in the pillow, and sleep well at night. I don't like being without it any more. Have used my machine for 2 years now, and it does make a difference... Seems like I think better, too... So try not to stress too much about it... you will feel lots better when you are getting good quality sleep...
  5. by   mcmike55
    I have a CPAP as well. Have had it for several years now. I sleep better than I have in years. I spent most of my weekends with severe headaches, and some esoph. regurg. many nights. Also, everytime I sat down, I fell asleep. When I went in the sleep lab, the tech said she almost came in several times, because I was struggling to breath!!! My O2 sat dropped into the 70's. The last half of the night in the lab, she put a CPAP on me, and I did very well. There is a break in period, where you get used to sleeping with the mask. Belly sleeping is difficult, but isn't my thing anyway. If you can't keep your mouth shut there is a chin strap to help, but I never had any problem.
    You'll find you sleep much better, less sleepy during the day, and my GERD is much better.
    With a full face mask, you may get a sore spot on your nose, but a bandaid and a little time, and I had no problem. There are several styles of mask on the market now, one that I would like to try looks like a big O2 nasal cannula.
    Don't be suprised a few week in, you have to have your pressure bumped up. That's because you're sleeping better!!!! :hatparty:
    I've heard that some just can't do it....I feel bad for them. To me, it's a small price to pay for a good night's sleep. Not to mention the health benefits.
    As far as getting off CPAP....I'm not real sure, but weight loss, some airway surgeries, etc may get you away from it, but not sure.
    Good Luck Mike
    ps my wife now has one, and we both now sleep better!!! :kiss
  6. by   VivaLasViejas
    Thanks you guys!! This is really encouraging news, and I hope that it works for me if I have to have it.......it would be wonderful to sleep better and have more energy!!
  7. by   skislalom
    My husband (whom I had to drag in kicking and screaming to the doc) has been using a CPAP for about 3 or 4 years...heck maybe longer. He never leaves home without it (even camping and we have an extra one on our boat). He was snoring so bad he had bleeding in his pharynx...I assume from dried out membranes and horrendous rattling vibrations. He couldn't stay awake anywhere...asleep at kids recitals, doctor waiting rooms, don't let him sit down cuz he's OUT. We couldn't sleep in the same room for years...apparently I beat the tar out of him in my sleep (or WAS I really asleep :chuckle )

    He went through 2 or 3 sleep studies...fought the pulmonologist and his wife tooth and nail about snoring, sleep apnea and the thought of a machine.

    He now sleeps very soundly - still can't stay awake if he sits down - I believe other issues are to blame there now. He doesn't snore at all with the CPAP on (and on the correct pressure). He keeps the mask on all night most of the time. He has a cool gelmask that seals around the nose...leaving the mouth free-no probs with keeping his mouth shut (well, while he's asleep anyway ). He now swears by using the CPAP and has been very much an advocate for it's use and the importance of being diagnosed and USING the machine (it just doesn't seem to work so well sittin on the nightstand or floor without putting the mask on) The only complaint he's ever had... is flatulance... apparently you are prone to swallow some air.

    I'm so glad I drug his hiney in and I can now say "SEE, I TOLD you so!"

    Do the sleep study and go from there...you will need to make adjustments as you go (with the pressure) depending on the severity of your apnea.

    Good luck!! I hope you can get taken care of and that it works well for you!

    ~T

    Hey, the March issue of Nursing 2005 has an article on sleep apnea...might find it interesting? :wink2:
    Last edit by skislalom on Mar 12, '05 : Reason: To add information
  8. by   pediatriclpn
    my sleep study is this WED. I was sent by my primary MD. I have the tonsils of an eight year old. Having back surgery the end of this month. The sleep specialist strongly urged sleep study before back surgery. If it helps this back pain, and I can get a good night's sleep. I'm all for it! I have taken care of many kids with CPAP via their trachs. So it isn't new to me. Also taken care of adults in rehab and LTC with it.
  9. by   NRSKarenRN
    needed to revise my sleep apnea links. these wesites are great places to provide info to discuss with your pcp.

    start here: sleep apnea faq
    http://www.newtechpub.com/phantom/faq/osa_faq.htm

    treatments:
    http://www.sleep-breathing.bc.ca/osa2.htm

    welcome to the sleep medicine home page
    tons of links to articles, user groups, sleep labs, etc.
    http://www.users.cloud9.net/~thorpy/#sleephome


    equipment website with product description
    cpap is medical device and requires prescription. usually ordered through local dme that can provide followup education and training. wesite has great product descriptions.
    http://www.cpapman.com/index.html
  10. by   MLR
    Quote from mjlrn97
    Anybody here have any personal experience with CPAP? I need to know because it's probably in my not-too-distant future........I had an appointment with a sleep specialist yesterday, and he's about 99% sure I have sleep apnea of some sort (I've got a sleep study scheduled in late May) and will need this equipment.

    Now, I've certainly seen CPAP machines before---patients often bring their own from home to use when they're in the hospital---but frankly, how are you supposed to sleep with that mask strapped onto your face and all that air rushing down through your nose and mouth? Does it really help? And are you ever able to stop using it once you start?

    Funny, the things a nurse doesn't know about until she becomes a patient herself.......

    Thanks in advance for sharing any advice or firsthand knowledge!
    I've worn a CPAP for about 6 years and I love it. It only took me a week or so to get used to it. The key is just to relax. At first the rushing air seems like it is too much, but the key to getting used to it is to use the gradual increase setting for the first week or so. It starts out at about 30% of the prescribed flow, then gradually incrases over about 20 minutes to the full throttle (!), and hopefully by that time, you are asleep. At first you have to breath more deeply and exhale more forcefully, but if you just relax and go with it, it is very easy to get used to. The masks are comfortable, the key is to get the straps adjusted so that you don't have any leaking. It's a wonderful thing........I wish I had a portable battery pack so I could take it camping. ..... Good luck!
  11. by   RN2Bn2006
    Quote from mjlrn97
    Anybody here have any personal experience with CPAP? I need to know because it's probably in my not-too-distant future........I had an appointment with a sleep specialist yesterday, and he's about 99% sure I have sleep apnea of some sort (I've got a sleep study scheduled in late May) and will need this equipment.

    Now, I've certainly seen CPAP machines before---patients often bring their own from home to use when they're in the hospital---but frankly, how are you supposed to sleep with that mask strapped onto your face and all that air rushing down through your nose and mouth? Does it really help? And are you ever able to stop using it once you start?

    Funny, the things a nurse doesn't know about until she becomes a patient herself.......

    Thanks in advance for sharing any advice or firsthand knowledge!
    I've been using a c-pap for about 3 years. I can't live without it !! There are times I hate it - going on a trip - trying to take a nap at my moms - not gonna happen. I absolutely cannot sleep without it. I must say I'm about 100 lbs overweight, and when I lost about 40 lbs, I could actually sleep some without it - but gradually gained the weight back, so did the c-pap. It did not take me long to get used to it. But I did NOT want the mask - I chose the one that's called Nasal Pillows I think. It's like straps that fit over the top of your head. It has a nose piece that comes down, and these soft 'pillows" that fit in your nostrils. Very comfortable. I would definately look in to all the different styles and pick the ones that best for you. I personally could not deal with the idea of strapping something over my face.

    I do look a little strange though!!
  12. by   abundantjoy07
    I don't have a CPAP...but I just wanted to say something.
    I recently got my insulin pump after years of shots. I never wanted to do it for lots of reasons. Boy, do I wish I started earlier! It's wonderful. Machines that can be beneficial to your health are amazing. The benefits seem to outweigh the nusciances (sp?). As a matter of fact, sometimes the benefits are so great that the pesky little things don't even really matter because you don't notice them at all! Getting started is a whole lot scarier than actually being on it. I hope it works out for you if you do indeed get one! Good luck!
  13. by   KrisRNwannabe
    I have tried CPAP so many times but it actually makes me worse. I panic with it on my face. so I go without. my husband sleeps with ear plugs so we can sleep in the same bed. I dealing with it by having weight loss surgery.
  14. by   mcmike55
    Good info gang!! I hope anyone "listening in" gets something out of this.
    Even for a long time CPAP-er, I enjoy hearing from others with similar problems.
    CPAP is not for everyone, some just can't get used to it. I feel bad, because in my mind, it's a relatively easy way to get a good night's rest, for you and your spouse, and anyone else in the listening area! :chuckle
    Weight loss, medication and surgery are all possible assists here. Tonsillectomy, and UPPP, uvulopalatoplasty, are some options, check with you doc. Sleep lab study is the place to start!
    As I said before, my wife has one, she had some sleep apnea/depravation symptoms, but I noticed restless legs syndrome the most.
    She now sleeps much better, but still kicks at times.
    Mike

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