Clarification Please?!

  1. We only need to take the dreadful Nclex RN once ever in our tire life right? Once we pass, that should be it?? It shouldn't matter if its a compact or noncompact state right? I will be taking my exam in California which is a noncompact. Then I will work in Arizona which is a compact state. This process just requires paper work and no retake of the exam, RIGHT??

    Thank you for the clarification.
  2. Visit Someday2bRN profile page

    About Someday2bRN

    Joined: Mar '09; Posts: 38

    12 Comments

  3. by   GilaRRT
    Most likely, yes. Provided you graduated from an accredited program, you will not have to retake NCLEX. Obviously, money, background check, license check, and a bunch of paperwork is needed to obtain licensure in another state.

    Prior to coming to this site, your best bet is to check on the requirements through the Arizona Board of Nursing.

    Also know, that while you may not be taking NCLEX, many facilities will have you take one or more exams prior to employment. Nearly every place I worked at, required a pharmacology test and/or a nursing test specific to the area I would be working.
  4. by   caliotter3
    Yes. Once you have passed, that is it. However, there is one catch. If you allow you license to be expired for too long a time, then you put yourself in a position to be required to retake the NCLEX in order to get a new license. It is always best to keep your license in force, or properly registered "inactive".
  5. by   caliotter3
    If you are going to work in AZ, why not get your initial license in AZ? Then you can endorse back into CA at a later date. CA is known to take a long time in the paperwork mill.
  6. by   Nurturer3
    You are correct. You only take the NCLEX once, pass it, then receive your license. Keep your license current and active.
  7. by   regularRN
    What does "compact" and "noncompact" mean, in terms of states?
  8. by   Curious_53
    Quote from Lotte
    What does "compact" and "noncompact" mean, in terms of states?
    I think I know what it means, but I can only think of how to put it in an example :P

    If I take the NCLEX in NH then the license is also good for practice in ME, VT, and MA - thus it is a compact state
    but in CA (apparently, i don't know this first hand) the NCLEX there is only good for CA and no other states.

    Hope this helps!
  9. by   cardiacRN2006
    https://www.ncsbn.org/158.htm

    List of compact states...
  10. by   elkpark
    Quote from Curious_53
    I think I know what it means, but I can only think of how to put it in an example :P

    If I take the NCLEX in NH then the license is also good for practice in ME, VT, and MA - thus it is a compact state
    but in CA (apparently, i don't know this first hand) the NCLEX there is only good for CA and no other states.

    Hope this helps!
    Compact licensure has nothing to do with the NCLEX -- you take the NCLEX once, regardless, and your results are recognized by any/every state (except, possibly, as caliotter noted, if you let your license lapse for an extended period of time, a state might insist you retake the exam before issuing a new license). The NLC (Nurse Licensure Compact) has to do with licensure. States that have chosen to join the compact have agreed to recognized each other's nursing licenses for purposes of working in the state. However, a license with "compact privileges" is only good as long as you maintain your permanent residence in your original state (the state in which you're licensed). If you move to another state, then you have to apply for licensure in the new state, even if it's another compact state.

    The easiest way to understand the NLC is that it works the same as our driver's licenses. You can use your "home" driver's license to drive all over the US for as long as you want, but, if you move to another state, you have 30 or 45 days (or whatever the state law says) to apply for a new license in your new state. You can't just drive indefinitely on your "old" state's license. The only reason we don't have to stop at each state line and apply for a new driver's license when we're on vacation is because, long ago, all 50 states got together and signed a compact agreeing to recognize each other's driver's licenses. The NLC works exactly the same way, except that not all 50 states have chosen to sign on.
  11. by   nursgirl
    Funny, I had the SAME question!! Still haven't gotten a straight answer about NCLEX-RN tho LOL... I plan on calling AZ's BON to see if I can't talk to someone. From what I can tell it's the same NCLEX exam no matter where you go in the USA... but it's hard to tell if we can just apply for CA and AZ licensure at the same time when we graduate and take one NCLEX for both... or do we need to apply in CA first, get a license, then apply to AZ by endorsement? I'm still confused....
    I guess it depends on whether you want licensure in both states or not... if you want one only then I would just apply there, take your NCLEX where they tell you to, etc...
    After I talk to AZ's BON I will post whatever info they give me....

    BTW, from what I can tell compact vs. noncompact state doesn't have anything to do with taking the NCLEX... it appears to simply have to do with licensure. I think once you've taken NCLEX you are done... but it would be a good idea to call the BON for the "official lowdown"
  12. by   Someday2bRN
    Thank you all for the information. I was aware of the dreadful nclex exam as a once in our lives headache and that I just need to apply for california and arizona without redoing the test. Thank goodness!! I needed the clarification cause people are confusing me! lol.

    I am registered in California and will work in Arizona. I did plan to work in california but the way the economy is becoming, it makes sense to move to arizona, better opportunity and cheaper! The weather is just not to my favor.

    How long does it take to get licensed in Arizona or how long is the wait?



    Thank you
  13. by   classicdame
    I recommend you contact the AZ Board of Nursing before you graduate. If you graduate in one state then apply for licensure in another, the licensing state has to get all sorts of info from the first state to be assured that your school met criteria for licensure. If you get your license in CA then all you have to do is transfer the finished product (paperwork) from CA and not start from scratch. Might be cheaper one way or the other too, which is why I recommend you ask.
  14. by   TuTonka
    Quote from Curious_53
    I think I know what it means, but I can only think of how to put it in an example :P

    If I take the NCLEX in NH then the license is also good for practice in ME, VT, and MA - thus it is a compact state
    but in CA (apparently, i don't know this first hand) the NCLEX there is only good for CA and no other states.

    Hope this helps!

    However, you can become licensed in Ca from another state by endorsement. I hope that helps you.

    TuTonka

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