Any Mormon/LDS nurses here? I need help? - page 10

Hi allnurses :) So I'm currently working in a surgical onco floor as a new grad nurse and my shift begins tomorrow. I just finished a month of didactics and now we will be sent to our units. So... Read More

  1. by   Horseshoe
    Quote from DannyBoy8
    It is different because it is protected by law, and should be. #titleVII


    Whitehall Healthcare to Pay $35,000 to Settle EEOC Religious Discrimination Lawsuit

    Signed,

    a not religious RN
    So what happens in a 24/7 unit if everyone on staff makes a claim to needing every Sunday off in order to practice their religion?
  2. by   elephant_mama
    To the OP - I consider myself to be a very spiritual person as well. In the ICU where I worked for many years, I realized that many of our patients had spiritual needs that were not being met while they were "stuck" in the ICU. I advocated for chaplain visits for those that could not attend services on their desired days, for chapel visits for patients that weren't too sick to travel, and for a list of "on call" contacts from the community for different religious affiliations that were not necessarily provided by the hospital. These were things I could do for my patients and community to feel like I was still serving while working. I also adjusted my own spiritual practices to accommodate my schedule as a nurse. Just because you're at work, doesn't mean your connection with God ceases.
  3. by   alwayslookingnp
    I have seen more nurses lose their jobs over schedule conflicts than anything else. You want to go to church, the other wants to be with her family, that one has small children. The list goes on and on. Scheduling is not easy. You cannot make everyone happy. I am an experienced NP and I can tell you no one ever made concessions for me because i had small children, had no babysitter, kids had an event at school or church, and on and on and on. The ones who whine and beg and demand annoy everyone, whether they will tell you so or not. If they give in and give you extra days, your manager and coworkers will be annoyed. Little things become big things and before long, you are ostracized and run off. I would strongly encourage you to take the schedule you are given and not complain. You knew what nursing was when you get into it.
  4. by   curious nature
    I'm not a Mormon, but you could try outpatient dialysis where dialysis is traditionally MWF or TTS, and only on Sundays for major holiday weeks (Thanksgiving, Christmas, New Year's) so the patients can spend the holidays with their families.
    Last edit by curious nature on Jun 16 : Reason: addendum
  5. by   Kooky Korky
    Quote from vetpharmtech
    Sometimes I am upset that I cannot get the days I want to be off. However, my parents remind me that the world does not revolve around me. They are a lot more religious than I am.

    I will give you one example. After a person passes away, it is believed by some Buddhists that his soul will linger for 49 days before it proceeds to his way to reincarnation. Therefore, on day 49, it is STRONGLY advised that family and friends come to a Buddhist temple to pray for his soul and to say goodbye.

    When my aunt's husband passed away, my mother took a day off to attend his 49th-day ceremony. She asked her boss in advance to have that day off. Her boss reluctantly let my mom off that day, but she was not happy about it because it was predicted that her off day would be a crazy day for the shop. My mom did not receive any discipline after that incident, but she got her boss' cold look for 2 weeks. Occasionally my mom got sarcastic statements from her boss, but she didn't complain. She said to me "My family's problem should not be a burden on my boss' shoulders. This is not like someone in the family is sick or have an accident. I wanted to attend my brother-in-law's ceremony because his soul would not be around anymore. I needed to say goodbye to him. I brought this problem on myself. I cannot blame my boss for that."

    I myself sometimes was asked to work on Thanksgiving. I didn't like it, but then I thought that I was not the only one who had family waiting for me at the dinner. I requested the specific time to leave so that

    When I sign a contract with my employer, I have to keep reminding myself that family time and religious observance should not be an excuse not to work on certain days. Whatever happens with my spiritual practice is not my employer's problem. My need is sometimes accommodated and sometimes not, but I won't lose my sleep over that.
    I think it is often better just to call off sick than ask permission to be off. It's often easier to get forgiveness than it is to get permission, as the saying goes. Of course, this must be kept to a real minimum - once or twice per year or so.

    You might have signed a contract , but that doesn't mean you will never need time off for family events or religious observation. Again, these have to be kept to a true minimum.

    One thing to keep in mind - the employer will likely be there long after you and I are 6 feet under.

    I hope your Mom is OK, not feeling guilty.
  6. by   Kooky Korky
    Quote from alwayslookingnp
    I have seen more nurses lose their jobs over schedule conflicts than anything else. You want to go to church, the other wants to be with her family, that one has small children. The list goes on and on. Scheduling is not easy. You cannot make everyone happy. I am an experienced NP and I can tell you no one ever made concessions for me because i had small children, had no babysitter, kids had an event at school or church, and on and on and on. The ones who whine and beg and demand annoy everyone, whether they will tell you so or not. If they give in and give you extra days, your manager and coworkers will be annoyed. Little things become big things and before long, you are ostracized and run off. I would strongly encourage you to take the schedule you are given and not complain. You knew what nursing was when you get into it.
    I can honestly say I didn't fully understand what Nursing involved re: schedule before I got into it. I didn't know any nurses and no one prepared me for having to work holidays, weekends, etc.

    One of the best scheduling techniques I know of is for staff to schedule themselves. If there are any gaps or too many people want to work or be off on any given day or shift, Management has the final word.

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