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Full publications in new grad portfolio?

Nurses   (160 Views | 6 Replies)

324 Profile Views; 19 Posts

I'm a new grad and am putting together my official portfolio for a job. I know publications are good to put in there in general, but what about if they are from prior to nursing school? They are still healthcare related (except one is more psychology-focused), but not directly related to nursing. If I do include them, should the full text be in the portfolio or just a list for managers to look up on PubMed if they desire? Thanks so much for the help! 

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dream'n has 27 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in UR/PA, Hematology/Oncology, Med Surg, Psych.

1,084 Posts; 15,251 Profile Views

I've been a nurse for a long time so I'm curious about this new graduate nurse portfolio.  I've never heard of it.  What publications would be included?  Do you mean studies that you personally have had published in a nursing journal and if so, I'm incredibly impressed.  I'm also really curious.

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19 Posts; 324 Profile Views

24 minutes ago, dream'n said:

I've been a nurse for a long time so I'm curious about this new graduate nurse portfolio.  I've never heard of it.  What publications would be included?  Do you mean studies that you personally have had published in a nursing journal and if so, I'm incredibly impressed.  I'm also really curious.

Maybe portfolio is just a fancy word people are using these days but I've been told it's been recommended with interviews (or to drop off with a manager to indicate your interest) to bring a nice folder with your resume, letters of recommendation, copy of your license/certifications, a personal statement about what nursing means to you, and I've heard publications if you have them. My publications aren't really related to nursing, so not that impressive (thanks though 🙂 ). I just have a previous BS degree and before I got into nursing school, I worked at an academic healthcare institution in a research laboratory. I'm listed as an author on a few research papers that came out of that lab because I helped with data collection, in the OR with the animal surgeries, and other things. I only thought it might be relevant because it's something unique about me and also the research was about spina bifida, and I'm hoping to go into NICU/PICU/Peds/L&D as an RN. 

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kkbb has 3 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Oncology.

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I can only speak to my own experience, so just keep in the back of your mind that I have only ever worked at my hospital.  That said....

I worked so hard on my portfolio.  I wanted it to be perfect for my interview.  And when I attempted to hand it over at said interview, the panel told me that they didn't need it.  Ultimately, if it wasn't on my resume or part of our discussion then they were not interested.  

I still have my portfolio.  But I really just keep it so that all my important stuff is all in one location.  

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llg has 43 years experience as a PhD, RN and specializes in Nursing Professional Development.

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If they are not very related to the job you are interviewing for, I would just have them listed on my resume -- maybe include an abstract in your portfolio.

I agree with kkbb above.   I think portfolios are nice to have for yourself -- to have a collection of everything you might need in one convenient place as you go through the job application process.   And they are nice to have as a record of information you might need in future years.   However, I don't think many people who actually hire people want to wade through all that stuff for every candidate.   Most of the time, when applicants have sent me a portfolio or insisted I review one, I have found just as much "questionable" material in them as positive stuff.   Some have even led me to not hire the person as they contained far too much personal information that made me question the wisdom of hiring them.

I would recommend having a thick portfolio of everything that you keep just for yourself -- so that you can always find everything you might need quickly.   Then make a short, basic portfolio to offer at an interview.   But be prepared for them to say they don't need or want it.

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amoLucia specializes in LTC.

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Back in the 'dark dinosaur ages', I would bring a 'portfolio'/folder of additional documents to my interviews. I would offer contents, as approp, but if it was declined, it was no issue.

Some other things to consider for inclusion were certificates for CEU programs' attendance/completion. Also documentation as samples of my writing skills and design skills for programs I developed. I added MY designed  lesson plans for my teaching positions, and P&Ps that I composed.

These weren't for typical staff positions, but for more specialized ones. Just pieces of my best 'works'. I was PREPARED to show what I was capable of doing.

It could also include any received awards or recognition certificates.

Edited by amoLucia
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19 Posts; 324 Profile Views

Thank you so much, everyone! This has all been super helpful and I really appreciate it 🙂 It has been hard so far to get a consensus based on what I was seeing on internet searches, so it's great to hear from experienced nurses like yourselves. I'll pass on including those publications and will maybe just have a list with abstracts for the truly relevant ones. Thanks again!

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