problems.....at work

  1. So I took my boards a week ago and I passed and now have a nursing license(YAY still celebrating)

    Work has told me I can not call myself a nurse. I have stated a few times to them that I am a nurse, provided a copy of my nursing license from the State BON, requested a raise, and yesterday was visited by management member and told "can you please chill on telling people you are a nurse." I have not refused to be on the floor, accepted my current CNA assignments and was told I will have to be retrained as a nurse but not given a time frame. I have only stated that I would like to be called a nurse and written the word nurse by name where everyone writes their titles. Apparently this has upset people and I've been told that no I can't be called a nurse. One nurse chewed me out for calling myself a nurse but I went to nursing school, passed my boards, and have a nursing license and am beyond fed up. I'm about ready to hand in my notice. I left work in tears yesterday.
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  2. Visit Cmanursestudenta profile page

    About Cmanursestudenta

    Joined: Jun '16; Posts: 23; Likes: 15
    from IA , US

    23 Comments

  3. by   TwoLayi
    Congulations!!! You worked hard and rightfully earned the title. However I am a little confused by your post. If you are currently working as a CNA, I can see the problem calling you a nurse, especially putting it on your name badge. You are still working in the capacity of a CNA at your place of employment. You haven't been oriented/trained to work as nurse there yet. I would ask for a specific time frame.
  4. by   Cmanursestudenta
    That is true however I made no complaints about the work simply stated that I am a nurse. It is not the facility that determines if you are a CNA, Med aide or Nurse but the state licensing board. If another nurse works as a tech bc we are short she doesn't have to change her name tag to that of a tech and would be upset if you did not refer to her as a nurse. Regardless of whether the work is that of a tech or a nurse what the state says on your license is what goes. I did not demand an immediate change of work, an immediate raise, or immediate training. I said I understood it would take some time but I earned that title and it is a state bestowed title and not a facility bestowed title. Nor have I attempted to do any of the work that a nurse at that facility does and in addition I have quietly done my job. However the only request I have made is that I be called by my correct title which is a nurse.
    Last edit by Cmanursestudenta on Jul 5 : Reason: bc
  5. by   caliotter3
    Your employer is not obligated to change your employment status. Many employers let personnel go once they have obtained a higher license. It stands to reason that your calling yourself a nurse is causing problems. Stop doing that, as requested by your employer. If you do not want to work in your present capacity, resign.
  6. by   Cmanursestudenta
    I have already put together my resignation letter and I told my husband I need to find another job. No they are not obligated to do anything...
  7. by   caliotter3
    For the record, you could be telling people that your petunias are yellow. If the employer tells you to stop the activity, then you need to do it before causing problems for yourself. I am almost certain that no one there wants to rain on your parade, but it looks like they don't want to have you work in the new capacity. I would be out of there as soon as I found a suitable new job. Congratulations and good luck.
  8. by   TwoLayi
    Quote from Cmanursestudenta
    It is not the facility that determines if you are a CNA, Med aide or Nurse but the state licensing board. If another nurse works as a tech bc we are short she doesn't have to change her name tag to that of a tech and would be upset if you did not refer to her as a nurse. Regardless of whether the work is that of a tech or a nurse what the state says on your license is what goes. I did not demand an immediate change of work, an immediate raise, or immediate training. I said I understood it would take some time but I earned that title and it is a state bestowed title and not a facility bestowed title.
    The difference is the nurse was trained to work in the facility as a nurse and you have not. And while you can legally call yourself a nurse, the facility has no obligation to designate you as one because you haven't been trained there as one. I don't see the problem telling co-workers you are a nurse. But having it on your badge is a different story, plus it's confusing to patients.
  9. by   Cmanursestudenta
    It's not on my name tag at all. The ppl who are offended are my coworkers and none of my patients know my license status. The assignment board is not seen by the public, patients, or anyone who does not work for the company.

    I think the root of my problem is there is no ac...
    Last edit by Cmanursestudenta on Jul 5
  10. by   Glycerine82
    If you are not employed in a nurse capacity, you're not a nurse at this facility. If you call yourself a nurse and use the title while working in a CNA capacity you will confuse your patients and staff, because this facility hasn't hired you as a nurse.
  11. by   Neo Soldier
    I'm trying to be respectful as I write this and I doubt I will be successful.
    You work for an establishment so abide by their rules; it's not about your feelings. If you don't like their rules, that's okay but don't burn bridges. Find another place and serve out your time quietly.
  12. by   forevergreatful
    this is simple. remember in class they talked about working in your scope of practice. Your job title is a CNA, thats what they hired you for. You have an RN license but you are not an RN at that facility. Throwing around titles can get patients and other workers confused. The nursing board is how you divide up pts. Even though no its can see it the staff who needs to see it will be threw off and might give you pts when you aren't working as an RN
  13. by   peachtreednurse
    You deserve to feel pride in your accomplishment, however being pushy and defiant because you feel overlooked or slighted not receiving recognition is premature, and from all you state, unwarranted. Working as a CNA in the interim I believe an important concern for patient safety, as well as personal and facility liability.

    Further, that until a thorough review of the policy for hiring, orientation, preceptorship, probation, and completion of a skill performance checklist and evaluation there is little justification for your insistence at being referred to as,"'Nurse".
    Last edit by peachtreednurse on Jul 7
  14. by   ProperlySeasoned
    I would not die on this hill. You have the potential to have years, if not decades, as an RN working in an RN role. Accept their policy, disagree with it mentally, and move on to bigger and better things (while keeping the bridge intact).

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