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Finally got my MSN in Nursing Education...Did I make a mistake?

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Specializes in Certified Pediatric Nurse/Novice Nurse Educator. Has 14 years experience.

Hello fellow graduate and post-graduate nurses, 

So I graduated last December with my MSN in Nursing Education at UTMB. I knew I wanted to teach nursing about 10 years ago and after several tries, I finally finished my program...then COVID happened. Needless to say, any chance of finding even an adjunct position for a brand new educator is hopeless. 

So I'm going on 10 months of not breaking in or using my degree, because schools and even my own hospital want you to have the degree to be able to "officially" teach, and I'm starting to get anxious that all my focus and research I did will just go to waste without the experience to back it up. 

So I start looking into DNP programs in nursing education or nursing leadership because well, eventually you need the doctorate to work at any university in the long run. The idea scares me, the cost scares me, the stress as a single mother and full time bedside nurse scares me...but I'm motivated, my passion is teaching, and I love research. 

EXCEPT...I can't find a single MSN-DNP program that accepts non-APRN masters prepared nurses. Even the ONE MSN-DNP Nursing Education program that focuses on academic leadership and curriculum development won't take an MSN in Nursing Education degree. I either have to be an NP, certified midwife, clinical nurse specialist, or nurse anesthetist.

So I checked out the school I graduated from and they won't even accept their own MSN-NE degree into their DNP program. Had I taken the CNL track, they would accept me, but the only difference in any of the programs is the program specific courses and clinical hours. We ALL had to have adv. patho, adv. pharm, adv. assessment, adv. nursing theory, and adv. research. But nope...the NE alumni does not qualify as a future DNP student. They said I could "transfer" into the CNL or other APRN program, but only 12 credits would be accepted...EVEN THE ONES I TOOK AT THEIR SCHOOL! It just doesn't make any sense. 

So what does one do in my position? I can't find work as an academic nurse educator and I can't find a school to accept my graduate degree to gain more research experience and qualifications. I can look at actual PhD programs in education or psychology that last way longer and eventually cost way more, but then I fear it dilutes my nursing background. I really feel like I messed up by pursuing my NE degree first. 😞

BSNbeDONE, ASN, BSN, LPN, RN

Specializes in Med/Surg, LTACH, LTC, Home Health. Has 35 years experience.

On 10/2/2020 at 4:52 PM, HandyMandiRN said:

Hello fellow graduate and post-graduate nurses, 

So I graduated last December with my MSN in Nursing Education at UTMB. I knew I wanted to teach nursing about 10 years ago and after several tries, I finally finished my program...then COVID happened. Needless to say, any chance of finding even an adjunct position for a brand new educator is hopeless. 

So I'm going on 10 months of not breaking in or using my degree, because schools and even my own hospital want you to have the degree to be able to "officially" teach, and I'm starting to get anxious that all my focus and research I did will just go to waste without the experience to back it up. 

So I start looking into DNP programs in nursing education or nursing leadership because well, eventually you need the doctorate to work at any university in the long run. The idea scares me, the cost scares me, the stress as a single mother and full time bedside nurse scares me...but I'm motivated, my passion is teaching, and I love research. 

EXCEPT...I can't find a single MSN-DNP program that accepts non-APRN masters prepared nurses. Even the ONE MSN-DNP Nursing Education program that focuses on academic leadership and curriculum development won't take an MSN in Nursing Education degree. I either have to be an NP, certified midwife, clinical nurse specialist, or nurse anesthetist.

So I checked out the school I graduated from and they won't even accept their own MSN-NE degree into their DNP program. Had I taken the CNL track, they would accept me, but the only difference in any of the programs is the program specific courses and clinical hours. We ALL had to have adv. patho, adv. pharm, adv. assessment, adv. nursing theory, and adv. research. But nope...the NE alumni does not qualify as a future DNP student. They said I could "transfer" into the CNL or other APRN program, but only 12 credits would be accepted...EVEN THE ONES I TOOK AT THEIR SCHOOL! It just doesn't make any sense. 

So what does one do in my position? I can't find work as an academic nurse educator and I can't find a school to accept my graduate degree to gain more research experience and qualifications. I can look at actual PhD programs in education or psychology that last way longer and eventually cost way more, but then I fear it dilutes my nursing background. I really feel like I messed up by pursuing my NE degree first. 😞

https://www.capella.edu/online-degrees/DNP-nursing-practice/admission-requirements/ 

Hope this helps😊

lyndsay1985

Specializes in none at the moment.

Hello Mandi-

  I am in the same boat as you!  My passion is nursing education as well. I obtained my MSN NE degree from Chamberlain University.  

I have SMALL TOWN GIRL problems Too! so I completely understand! 

1. I am unemployed due to familial issues 

2. I live very Remotely

3.  My state is under LOCKDOWN due to Covid.

 Universities, Working online as a nurse educator is completely futile with a MSN degree.  If you live near a community college that has an opening perhaps you have a chance at utilizing that MSN degree otherwise teaching clinicals is probably what you will be doing and even then they have made that for BSN nurses and low pay that you cannot afford a family on.  

So, like you I am currently looking into going back for my DNP again with a concentration of Education. There is only two online universities I have seen that have offered this track as an all in one option: Regis College, or American Sentinel University. 

Otherwise the schools I see online that is offer a DNP but then you will be paying separately once the DNP is completed to obtain a post doctorate graduate certificate in nursing education. $$$ + Time. 

The Barriers/Challenges I am currently facing is that because I took my MSN in NE and not in an advanced nurse practice role Im behind the 8-ball. My practicum hours only totaled 100 hours where an advanced practice role RN would have gained 500-600 hours. 

The AACN DNP Essentials that these DNP curriculum programs adhere to states that: A minimum of a 1000 post BSN practicum hours are to be obtained in order to graduate the program.  It also states that those practicum hours obtained in a non advanced practice RN role such as Nursing leadership/administration or Nursing Education within the MSN program is not allowed to be counted towards 1,000 hour requirement. 

Where the Advanced Practice RN gained 600 hours in MSN program would then only need 400 hours to obtain their 1000 hour requirement. Which they would obtain through the DNP scholarly project thus graduating in 2 or 3 years.   

So then there is Me- I am now needing 600 hours of practicum in addition to the 400 of the scholarly DNP project to obtain 1,000 hours and graduate. 

So how does this unemployed, living on a remote island, in a state that is under lock down due to covid reach this ultimate goal of having a DNP? 

So this is the question I am asking so far from the school I have received the message that practicum hours can consists of attending  ad hoc committees, professional committees, unit based councils, etc. pretty much if you work at a Magnet Designated facility where you would have access to these resources of UPC and such.  

So I don't know if this is even a viable option for me at this point? I don't know if you have heard any more since you have posted on this thread but it is nice to know or learn that I am not the only one facing these barriers!

thanks for listening

 

lyndsay1985

Specializes in none at the moment.

No, actually I haven't good idea though do you know of any programs online off hand?

Thanks 

lyndsay1985

Specializes in none at the moment.

203 Bravo,

I wanted to say thank you for your perspective on this, I didn't even think to look into this avenue. I scratched a little bit of the surface, and still need to do some deeper digging but it looks like Drexel University has a pretty decent E.D.D. program with a nursing educator concentration do you happen to know anything about it?