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English as Second Language Students

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by usadog usadog (New) New

Have you ever failed a student who is not English speaking and during a transition period from a physician role to a nurse role and from another culture to America culture? Do you think it is reasonable based on the communication skills and culture shock to fail a straight "A" student?

VickyRN, MSN, DNP, RN

Specializes in Gerontological, cardiac, med-surg, peds. Has 16 years experience.

Have you ever failed a student who is not English speaking and during a transition period from a physician role to a nurse role and from another culture to America culture? Do you think it is reasonable based on the communication skills and culture shock to fail a straight "A" student?

No. But, I'm not there with you and don't know all the circumstances. I'm very sorry you are going through this. In my limited experience, most ESL (English as a second language) students do not do well in accelerated programs. Most ESL students need LONGER time to complete a nursing program. Our college of nursing adviser often suggests to ESL students that they go through our program part-time, to ease the transition.

HazeKomp, BSN, RN

Specializes in L&D.

most ESL (English as a second language) students do not do well in accelerated programs. Most ESL students need LONGER time to complete a nursing program. Our college of nursing adviser often suggests to ESL students that they go through our program part-time, to ease the transition.

I find that even those who speak and read English fluently but are from foreign countries still have great difficulty communicating. I teach clinicals for an accelerated program, and often wish they were in more traditional schools as they get overwhelmed so easily. Many times it is NOT lack of knowlege, lack of theory but the conversational English at the bedside and nurses' station that leaves them totally confused.

Haze

ElliShay

Specializes in OB, MS, Education, Hospice.

Have you ever failed a student who is not English speaking and during a transition period from a physician role to a nurse role and from another culture to America culture? Do you think it is reasonable based on the communication skills and culture shock to fail a straight "A" student?

I am in this situation exactly--and fortunately my student is now doing well. Initially, though, she was really at risk. I worried that she would fail because of the language barrier--not because she couldn't understand the material or because she lacked skill. I finally came to the conclusion that I would help her all I could, but nursing practice in the USA requires the ability to function appropriately in this culture. She has to be able to communicate effectively with the patients, her peers, the hospital staff, etc. it is a matter of patient safety.

We did send her to student services, however, and she qualified for a reader and pencil paper exams. This has helped immensely. Her grasp of the English language is increasing daily, and she is revealing her wicked sense of humor to all of us. She is joining in group discussions much more--and is finally able to share the depth of her knowledge. This has been so gratifying to see.

I know that every situation is different--and I wish you luck!

Edited by ElliShay
spelling error

NRSKarenRN, BSN, RN

Specializes in Vents, Telemetry, Home Care, Home infusion. Has 44 years experience.

might get some ideas:

nln audio web series: topics for fall series coming soon!

the final session of the spring audio-web series will be presented on thursday april 2.

content

when projecting who will be the students entering basic nursing education programs during the next twenty-five years, our attention turns to the growing english language learning (ell) population. yet many nursing students who identify as english language learners today continue to falter academically signaling the need for further exploration of student experience and faculty and classroom practices. this audioweb conference will explore research findings of the lived experiences of students as english language learners in the nursing classroom from interpretive perspectives. themes which emerged will be shared as foundational understanding for considering strategies and resources to address and proactively respond to the myriad concerns encountered by ell students everyday.

joann mulready-shick, edd, rn, cne

HazeKomp, BSN, RN

Specializes in L&D.

nln conference: april 2: experiences of nursing students as english language learners -

joann mulready-shick, edd, rn, cne

"many nursing students who identify as english language learners today continue to falter academically signaling the need for further exploration of student experience and faculty and classroom practices. this audioweb conference will explore research findings of the lived experiences of students as english language learners in the nursing classroom from interpretive perspectives. themes which emerged will be shared as foundational understanding for considering strategies and resources to address and proactively respond to the myriad concerns encountered by ell students everyday."

was anyone able to hear this conference?

if so, would you please share some of your new knowledge and wisdom with the rest of us?

would love to hear some of their strategies for helping these students!

thanks,

haze

I am teaching allied health to highschool students, so it is a bit different. I have an ESL student and no, I am not allowed to fail her. I have to remediate her over and over until she passes. I too found that sending her to student services to gt a read aloud for testing helped tremendously. She went from scoring in the 60s to in the 80s. She is bright, charming and highly motivated, so I am glad to help her along any way I can. She wants to go to med school some day and I think she's going to be fantastic!

HazeKomp, BSN, RN

Specializes in L&D.

... I have an ESL student ... I too found that sending her to student services to gt a read aloud for testing helped tremendously. She went from scoring in the 60s to in the 80s. She is bright, charming and highly motivated,...

OK, I can see how a "read aloud" can help for testing... I have many very smart ESL students who can recite a tremendous amount of information back to me, when asked a question.

But, the problem is in clinicals. They have difficulty interviewing the patients and their families. They have trouble gleaning information from charts and electronic records. They can't "keep up" in shift report with the information being presented. They have difficulty articulating their assessment in a professional manner to the physicians and nursing personnel. And their charting is poor.

Communication is essential in our profession! A "B" student who is a superb communicator is a better clinical nurse than an "A+" student who cannot communicate verbally or in writing in a clinical setting.

And I don't know how to help these very smart students in the clinical setting. As you say, they are charming, kind-hearted, and really want to do well so my heart goes out to them....

Haze

JBudd, MSN

Specializes in Trauma, Teaching. Has 40 years experience.

Some of the articles I read about ESL students recommended group study with role playing, just praticing speaking English and listening, with feedback from non-ESL or more fluent ESL students.

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