What supplies do YOU use to start an IV? - page 2

Our ER has a committee to identify ways to more prudently use supplies (enviromentally and fiscally.) Emesis basins were targeted because staff use them for everything but emesis, namely as a... Read More

  1. by   LHH1996
    Hi Rnleigh...i see what you are saying..but don't you set up prior to starting the IV anyway. i would have everything ready so there would be no "digging"..oh well...i look forward to seeing what comes of it...LOL...
  2. by   PAERRN20
    Wow it seems like you are up against a tough crowd! I don't understand why the facility can not do the caddy basket as others have mentioned. All supplies are on the caddy and you can easily carry it from room to room. The caddy has IV's, tegaderms, alcohol preps, betadine, 2x2s, tape, flushes- you get the point. Everything you need at reach. Love it.
  3. by   mjjlRN
    as for the 10cc flush, I always use one when I start a Peripheral IV, I like to flush with a full 10cc to be extra sure that it is a good line.
    To the orig. question: I take a towel (folded as it is on our cart) then place my 10cc flush, my J-loop, my IV start kit, and my jelcos (usually 2 20s and an 18) on the towel, and I roll the towel up around the supplies, then, I just have to carry a towel roll into the room. . .the towel then goes under the patients arm to catch blood.
  4. by   rnleigh
    I'm really greatful for all the input.

    I think I'm going to revisit the caddy idea. I'm going to brainstorm on the towel idea, too.

    Thanks to all. I'll give an update sometime later!
  5. by   RedSox33RN
    We use the caddies also, though many times I just grab a 10cc flush (though we have to make our own - they haven't figured out yet that the pre-filled flushes are probably more cost and time-effective than grabbing a 10cc syringe, blunt needle and 15cc saline container!), j-loop and pre-packaged IV start kit. I always carry around a 16g, 18g, 2-20g and a 22g with me all day.

    We are not allowed to leave IV start stuff - mostly just the catheters - in pt rooms since only the trauma rooms have locking cabinets. It is sort of a pain in the butt, but whatever isn't nailed down does tend to walk away.

    I'd never heard of using an emesis basin. Most times I don't need a chux or washcloth for those that bleed a lot - a good amount of pressure above the catheter placement usually does the trick for me, but have had several "fool" me, and had to change my scrub bottoms for those that bled all down their arm and onto my leg!
  6. by   qcumba
    Hi,

    if you dont use a basin where do you put your sharps?I'm presuming that an emesis basin is what we call a kidney dish, we always use a kidney dish when starting an IV,giving IMI basically anything involving sharps to transport said sharp from bedside to sharps bin.

    when you say 10cc flush do you mean you have pre filled syringes? how cool is that, wish we had those.
  7. by   RedSox33RN
    Quote from qcumba
    Hi,

    if you dont use a basin where do you put your sharps?I'm presuming that an emesis basin is what we call a kidney dish, we always use a kidney dish when starting an IV,giving IMI basically anything involving sharps to transport said sharp from bedside to sharps bin.

    when you say 10cc flush do you mean you have pre filled syringes? how cool is that, wish we had those.
    Our catheters have retractable sharps, but then we have a bedside container in each room.

    I miss those pre-filled flushes! It is a waste of time and resources to fill one for each IV start, to flush IVs, and then for meds if the pt has a saline lock.
  8. by   bjaeram
    Quote from qcumba
    Hi,

    if you dont use a basin where do you put your sharps?I'm presuming that an emesis basin is what we call a kidney dish, we always use a kidney dish when starting an IV,giving IMI basically anything involving sharps to transport said sharp from bedside to sharps bin.

    when you say 10cc flush do you mean you have pre filled syringes? how cool is that, wish we had those.
    I immediately turn around and put them in the sharps container on the wall. It's very dangerous to leave a dirty sharp out for any length of time. You never know when it will get kicked, grabbed, forgotten.....
  9. by   ThrowEdNurse
    I always grab a mayo stand. I cannot stand using the pt as a table. My pts are incapable of being still and not kicking like infants and leave me searching for my IV cap and flush that is now rolled up in the sheets or worse on the floor. Metal stands are easily cleaned and can hold alot. The only problem is searching one down. I think emesis basins would fly around too easily. But of course, my pts are dramatical....
  10. by   Pixie.RN
    Quote from ThrowEdNurse
    I always grab a mayo stand. I cannot stand using the pt as a table. My pts are incapable of being still and not kicking like infants and leave me searching for my IV cap and flush that is now rolled up in the sheets or worse on the floor. Metal stands are easily cleaned and can hold alot. The only problem is searching one down. I think emesis basins would fly around too easily. But of course, my pts are dramatical....
    Big fan of the Mayo stand here!! I always track one down at the start of my shift and put it near my zone. We have 3 Mayo stands and 3 zones, so I can usually snag one of them for my side. I love it -- I can put meds, fluids, and IV supplies on it and wheel it on in.
  11. by   SecondGenRN
    We have 4 IV tray's where I work. Each is stocked with cotton swabs, alcohol swabs, saline locks, syringes, tourniquets and various sized angios... we grab the kit by the handle, walk in pt room, start IV, return IV tray to nursing station... very easy for all... we all restock the trays from the main stock cart if we have a few seconds extra... works well and no emesis basins needed
  12. by   cjcsoon2bnp
    Quote from SecondGenRN
    We have 4 IV tray's where I work. Each is stocked with cotton swabs, alcohol swabs, saline locks, syringes, tourniquets and various sized angios... we grab the kit by the handle, walk in pt room, start IV, return IV tray to nursing station... very easy for all... we all restock the trays from the main stock cart if we have a few seconds extra... works well and no emesis basins needed
    On my floor we have two IV trays and the nurses just bring the tray as close to the room as possible and grab the supplies they need for that patient. I haven't heard any complaints yet.

    !Chris
  13. by   canoehead
    If someone is isolated there is usually a supply cart with gowns, etc outside the room. You put the IV caddy on the cart outside the room, bring what you need inside with you, and if you need an extra something you can usually grab it off the caddy without touching anything else. If not just whip off your glove, grab what you need, put new glove on, and you're done.

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