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double major

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if I'm doing an AA in Nursing, what other major -AS- can choose to have a double major at the end. Using most of my AA in Nursing classes,I dont want to tzake a puch of different new classes

ixchel

Specializes in critical care.

Is there any particular reason why you have to get a second associates degree? If you're going to put in additional effort, I would advise a general studies major, so that immediately after graduation, you've put in the groundwork for a BSN. Or, if a BSN doesn't hold interest for you, a degree in science would only broaden your knowledge of physiologic processes. That would be my own second choice.

No, I am very interested in the BSN. tHAT's like my dream but in a future I was thinking about making my own company and was thinking about gettin the AS in health care management. Do you think its a good idea?

Definitely not writing.

Why waste credits on another associate's when you could take extra classes toward your BSN?

ixchel

Specializes in critical care.

No, I am very interested in the BSN. tHAT's like my dream but in a future I was thinking about making my own company and was thinking about gettin the AS in health care management. Do you think its a good idea?

At this point, I think your efforts would best be served getting an AA in general studies, then. Look at the BSN bridge program you most want to attend, and make the general studies associates degree fit all of the gen EDs you need for the BSN. It is the absolute smartest thing you can do to plan for the future, knowing BSN is your next step.

enuf_already I know my English is not the best but I came to this country three years ago knowing no english at all, and I have managed to learn on the way while taking my prerequisites and this semester I am going to graduate, after taking 4 and 5 classes each semester including summers, and getting excellent grades something that many people are not capable of doing even when they know perfect English.

And it is not a waste time if I can do all at the same time and finish with many degrees.

Edited by SussetH.Alcover

direw0lf, BSN

Has 3 years experience.

I think you should do what PP's said and take credits twd the BSN, that will help so much, so you can even work as a student nurse while you're getting your BSN, and you can minor in business then too.

NurseGirl525, ASN, RN

Specializes in ICU.

enuf_already I know my English is not the best but I came to this country three years ago knowing no english at all, and I have managed to learn on the way while taking my prerequisites and this semester I am going to graduate, after taking 4 and 5 classes each semester including summers, and getting excellent grades something that many people are not capable of doing even when they know perfect English.

And it is not a waste time if I can do all at the same time and finish with many degrees.

Why do you think it's good to have many Associate's degrees? This seems to me to be a case where you are not quite understanding how college degrees work. Your nursing degree should be an ASN not AA. There is no need to get a health care degree. You are getting that with an ASN. If you decide to get a BSN then you will get nursing leadership classes which is what you need to advance into management someday, not some generic health care degree which teaches a person to run the front in a physicians office.

JustBeachyNurse, RN

Specializes in Complex pediatrics turned LTC/subacute geriatrics. Has 11 years experience.

A second associates degree offers zero benefit and a lot of wasted time and cost. It's not he who had the most degrees wins. You are more prudent taking courses towards the next level as different basic classes are needed for a BSN.

An AS in health care management is not going to help you create a company or enter management. Most health care administrator roles are BSN or higher nurses and those with Bachelor's in Business Administration (concentration of management/health care management) or a master's in business administration (MBA) or even a Master's in public health.

There is close to zero advantage to having multiple associates degrees