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Do you think this is true about ADN and BSN nurses?

Posted

Diploma/ADN nurses tend to be better prepared for the work of clinical nursing upon graduation. For the first year of nursing, the percentage of revoked licenses is lower for ADN/Diploma when compared to BSN. BSNs on the other hand, after getting over the shock of the first couple years, tend to produce "better outcomes" after that period when compared to ADN/Diploma nurses. Better outcomes meaning shorter hospital stays, less frequent same day returns to the hospital after discharge and a higher percentage of desired outcomes being achieved.

marilynmom, LPN, NP

Specializes in Adolescent Psych, PICU.

Not true at all.

Maybe a long time ago that was true, but not anymore.

All the new nurses I work with (ADN and BSN) are basically the same-- nursing is learned on the job when YOU are the RN, not in any amount of clinicals.

I came from a very clinical heavy BSN program and I can tell you that no amount of clinical prepares you for the real world. My book knowledge helped me more than my clinical experience honestly in the ICU--you have to know in your HEAD what is going on with these patients, skills are easily learned.

Students really shouldn't be worrying about all this IMO. Clinicals and school is NOTHING at ALL like real world nursing.

Edited by marilynmom

Tweety, BSN, RN

Specializes in Med-Surg, Trauma, Ortho, Neuro, Cardiac. Has 28 years experience.

I don't think any of that is true.

llg, PhD, RN

Specializes in Nursing Professional Development. Has 44 years experience.

That is definitely NOT true in my region of the country. We have several nursing programs in the region of all types -- ADN, Diploma, and BSN. We have an excellent BSN program that probably produces the highest quality of new graduate overall: those folks graduate very well prepared. We have another BSN program that is horrible and should be closed. There is similar variability in the quality of the ADN programs, etc.

The quality of the schools varies based on the particular school, not the degree they offer.

Current studies from Dr. Linda Aiken, FAAN at the University of Pennsylvania show strong correlations between the level of education of the RN and better patient outcomes. There is a positive correlation between level of education and patient safety, and a negative correlation with nurse errors. Aiken's studies have supported this finding over and over in multiple settings, and over longitudinal studies.

Better educated RN make fewer errors and create safer environments for patients.

I think that the topic is interesting, but whether it is factual or not is another question.

suzy253, RN

Specializes in Telemetry/Med Surg.

Current studies from Dr. Linda Aiken, FAAN at the University of Pennsylvania show strong correlations between the level of education of the RN and better patient outcomes. There is a positive correlation between level of education and patient safety, and a negative correlation with nurse errors. Aiken's studies have supported this finding over and over in multiple settings, and over longitudinal studies.

Better educated RN make fewer errors and create safer environments for patients.

Sorry but this study has been found to be flawed. Too many variables.

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