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Dnp

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Is it good for the profession or just good for the academic ego.

AMERICAN ACADEMY OF NURSE PRACTITIONERS

Discussion Paper: Doctor of Nursing Practice

In October 2004, the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) published a position

paper focusing on the issue of converting the terminal degree for advanced practice nursing from

the Master's to the Doctor of Nursing Practice by the year 2015. To that end, two task forces

consisting of members of AACN have been created to develop: 1. "Essentials for the DNP",

similar to the Essentials currently in use for NP Master's Programs, and 2. the "Road Map"

which will propose a process for smoothly accomplishing this goal by 2015. The concept of a

practice or clinical doctorate has been under discussion within the nurse practitioner community

since 2001 when the National Organization of NP Faculties (NONPF) established a task force to

examine the issues from the nurse practitioner educational perspective. The American Academy

of Nurse Practitioners (AANP) and the American Academy of Nurse Practitioners Certification

Program have been participants in these activities as they have unfolded.

The rationale for the shift in the academic preparation of nurses in advanced practice focuses on

several issues, including the observation that advanced practice nursing is currently one of only a

few health care disciplines that prepare their practitioners at the master's rather than the doctoral

level. Most disciplines that prepare licensed independent practitioners (LIPs) such as podiatrists,

psychologists, optometrists, pharmacists, osteopaths, medical doctors and dentists prepare them

at the clinical doctoral level. Moreover, it is clear that the course work currently required in NP

master's programs is equivalent to that of other clinical doctoral programs. It is important

however, that the transition to clinical doctoral preparation for nurse practitioners be conducted

so that master's prepared nurse practitioners will not be disenfranchised or denigrated in any

way.

The following issues, therefore, will need to be addressed in order for the preparation of nurse

practitioners at the clinical doctoral level to be developed in a logical and equitable fashion.

1. The quality of the preparation of current master's and post-master's nurse practitioner

programs must not be compromised. Nurse practitioners have demonstrated their skills in

providing high quality care to their patients regardless of gender, age or socioeconomic status.

The conversion of nurse practitioners programs that offer a doctorate in nursing practice should

not change that fact. Nurse practitioners provide safe, high quality care in all specialties and

practice sites in which they are involved.

2. The transition to the new title must be handled smoothly and seamlessly, so that there will not

be a negative impact on nurse practitioner practice and sound patient care and that parity will be

maintained.

3. Additional requirements, if any, made in the DNP programs should reflect areas where

increased depth has been recognized to enhance nurse practitioner practice.

4. Skilled clinical practice must be maintained as the foundation of all nurse practitioner

educational programs.

5. Issues related to parity, providing reasonable methods for currently prepared nurse

practitioners to obtain the DNP if desired and prevention of discrimination in reimbursement,

must be addressed.

6. Programs should be developed based upon agreed upon standards and guidelines. The

premature development of programs should be avoided.

7. Accreditation standards need to be maintained to ensure the preparation of safe, highly

qualified clinicians who can be certified and recognized in the regulatory arena.

8. Programs should remain accessible and affordable to qualified applicants, in order to maintain

an adequate number of highly qualified nurse practitioner clinicians to contribute to the health of

their communities.

The conversion of existing master's programs to practice doctorate programs can add strength to

programs, to nurse practitioner practice and recognition in the health care arena. The

development of such programs must be conducted in a manner that allows for smooth

transitioning.

AANP is dedicated to and continues to address these issues as steps are taken to implement

activities that would lead to the development of DNP nurse practitioner educational programs in

the future.

References*:

American Association of Colleges of Nursing (2004). AACN position statement on the practice

doctorate in nursing. Washington, D.C.: Author.

American Association of Colleges of Nursing (2005). DRAFT: DNP Essentials Revised October

12, 2005. Retrieved October, 2005 from

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gauge14iv

Specializes in ICU, ER, HH, NICU, now FNP. Has 23 years experience.

This statement was posted by someone previously.

See this months issue of JNP for additioanl info - they aren't going to make us all go back for a DNP.

In fact it's unlkely they will even get it passed as entry. Hey nursing still can't agree on AD ns BS for entry level nursing - why should NP be any different?

prairienp

Has 33 years experience.

This statement was posted by someone previously.

See this months issue of JNP for additioanl info - they aren't going to make us all go back for a DNP.

In fact it's unlkely they will even get it passed as entry. Hey nursing still can't agree on AD ns BS for entry level nursing - why should NP be any different?

I think the DNP will be the entry requirement by 2015, just as the Masters is now. The certification agencies will require the DNP in order to write the certification exam as they require the Masters now. The exceptions may be the states that don't currently require the certification exam.

gauge14iv

Specializes in ICU, ER, HH, NICU, now FNP. Has 23 years experience.

That's what they are pushing for, I don't see it happening, For one thing - it is doubtful that enough DNP programs can be put in place by then - where will all these DNP qualified faculty come from? Where will the money come from? It's a nice idea, and I can see some states doing it but I highly doubt the cert bodies will be able to madate that in regions where there is not the resources to provide access to training.

What I see happening in those regions is state BNE's saying the cert exam is no longer necessary, just graduation from an accredited masters program.

prairienp

Has 33 years experience.

that's what they are pushing for, i don't see it happening, for one thing - it is doubtful that enough dnp programs can be put in place by then - where will all these dnp qualified faculty come from? where will the money come from? it's a nice idea, and i can see some states doing it but i highly doubt the cert bodies will be able to madate that in regions where there is not the resources to provide access to training.

what i see happening in those regions is state bne's saying the cert exam is no longer necessary, just graduation from an accredited masters program.

what i am seeing/reading is that the certification and accreditation agencies are working together to make this a reality. the same argument was made in the mid -80s when the majority of programs were not masters, now we only have a few women's health certificate programs.

over the next 2-3 years you will see a massive switch to the dnp from the masters. will faculty recruitment be a problem, absolutely. will the np faculty shortage be any different than our current situation, i don't think so. we cannot go on requiring 50-60 graduate credits for a master's degree, what other master's degree requires that many credits? education is around 24-30 as is psychology. students should receive the degree equal to the # of credits being taken. look at pharmacy, physical therapy, occupational therapy, all professional clinical doctorates.

gauge14iv

Specializes in ICU, ER, HH, NICU, now FNP. Has 23 years experience.

I agree that we NEED it - I just don't see how they are going to get that many DNP programs up and running in 10 years time and where they are going to get the faculty to staff them. Now 20 years from now, I could see it happening, but 10 is cutting things a bit close. Starting new programs takes lots of money, resources and people - things that universities traditionally (some expceptions I know) are pretty short of.

60 hours is an INSANE amount of hours for a masters degree! I'd be all for a DNP , but as it stands right now, I'd have to move out of state to make it happen.

I'd have to move out of state to make it happen.

And that's a decision not to be taken lightly!:chuckle

God bless Texas!

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