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Dilemma..How do I get from here to Bscn ?

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by ImATotalDiva ImATotalDiva (New) New

630 Profile Views; 14 Posts

So, I'm in a bit of a dilemma. 21, graduated high school three years ago. I didn't know what I wanted to do so I went to Sheridan for programs I was unsure about last year (2013). Did half a semester of paralegal, and half a semester of gas (not the health profile). To make the story short, I did horribly in both semesters as I was unfocused & even stopped going to class.

Fast forward to now, I've finally decided that I want to be a RN, I'm so dedicated & determined to get there. I've been in full time adult high school, working on my prerequisites and maintaining a 90% overall average. After doing research, I realized that to get direct entry into the collaborative b.sc.n programs you have to have maintained a cumulative 3.0 average in all post secondary education which I don't have (not even close). I don't think it's fair that the schools would hold two unrelated semesters I did last year against me, despite my most recent RELATED marks. What I'm doing now should be more reflective of me as a student. I realize I am paying for my mistakes & poor decisions but I'm in a completely different place in my life. Anyways, does anyone know of a solution or another pathway of reaching my goal ? Should I still apply ?

I was also thinking of taking the practical nursing & then bridging route (any route would take me 5 years) I don't know. I'm just so confused right now, any help would be appreciated.

Edited by ImATotalDiva

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152 Posts; 3,993 Profile Views

For the college u went to and got the poor grades, find out what their policy is on changing or excluding those grades. Some schools have a policy for example where u can repeat those classes and replace the old grade with a new grade.

Otherwise I would say just keep taking other classes and the grades will average out. Meanwhile consider working on being a cna or emt in the process. This will open doors, get you some money along the way, and give first priority on a new grad job if you work at a hospital that offers new grad training. It will also give you a taste of nursing.

Grades are just one piece of the overall nursing application. Keep working on your overall package as well as education. You'll get there so long as you don't give up.

Apply for any program you think will be a good fit for you. Worst case scenario, get a bachelors in something else you enjoy and then apply for an accelerated or entry level masters program. This will give you time to continue improving your gpa and decrease your competition when applying (they require a first bachelors). Perhaps consider getting a first bachelors in another language and spend some time abroad while doing it. This will be fun and helpful later.

Edited by _firefly

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14 Posts; 630 Profile Views

I graduated from high school in 2013, and did 2 semesters of college later that year (uncompleted). Would I be considered a mature student, high school student or transfer student if I'm trying to get into a nursing program for 2015-2016 ? Also is it ok that I'm taking my prereqs at an adult school (U level) instead of college like a pre health program ?

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loriangel14 is a RN and specializes in Acute Care, Rehab, Palliative.

1 Follower; 6,923 Posts; 36,379 Profile Views

You would have to check with the school but you would likely be considered a mature student. you would have to check with the program you want to apply to find out if the prerequisites you are taking will be accepted.

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Fiona59 has 18 years experience.

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Mature students are usually over 21 and out of high school for at least two years.

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3,950 Posts; 34,805 Profile Views

Ontario schools do not have one definition of what a mature student is, that would be the simple and straight forward thing to do and that is not how Ontario bureaucratic organizations do things.

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Ontario schools do not have one definition of what a mature student is, that would be the simple and straight forward thing to do and that is not how Ontario bureaucratic organizations do things.
exactly, it seems like every school has their own definition & it's extremely frustrating.

Perhaps you could help me with another question, I want to get in to BSCN so I'm doing my prereqs and upgrading courses at an adult learning center, so far I've managed to maintain a 90 average. My problem is that year I spent at Sheridan was horrible and I did very poorly. I noticed most collaborative programs want a 3.0 gpa for post secondary, but do you think I still have a chance ? I only did 8 classes.

My marks are bio 93, chem 89, Math 91, English 95 I'm also upgrading two other gr 12 courses

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3,950 Posts; 34,805 Profile Views

I do not have any knowledge of the selection criteria that the committees use to choose students, but my thoughts are, as long as you were not in the nursing program at Sheridan, your marks should not negatively impact your chances. Educators are aware that poor marks during the first year of college or university are not a true indicator of a student's potential performance. IMO the adult learning centre marks are a better predictor of your potential in nursing school, because they show your scholastic ability when you are motivated by a goal.

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Esme12 is a ASN, BSN, RN and specializes in Critical Care, ED, Cath lab, CTPAC,Trauma.

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multiple threads merged as per the Terms of Service

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14 Posts; 630 Profile Views

I do not have any knowledge of the selection criteria that the committees use to choose students, but my thoughts are, as long as you were not in the nursing program at Sheridan, your marks should not negatively impact your chances. Educators are aware that poor marks during the first year of college or university are not a true indicator of a student's potential performance. IMO the adult learning centre marks are a better predictor of your potential in nursing school, because they show your scholastic ability when you are motivated by a goal.

ok thanks !! I guess I'm still going to try, this is what I really want so not gonna let anything stop me ! :)

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