Did I make a mistake doing FNP?

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I was just accepted into a direct entry FNP program, but I previously thought that FNP's can work in hospital settings too, not just primary care. Now I'm looking through the forums and I'm getting the impression that it is becoming less and less common for a FNP to work in the hospital. Should I have gone into ACNP and is there a hope for me to work in the hospital?

SlyFoxRN, BSN, RN

1 Article; 137 Posts

Has 1 years experience.

With the consensus model, yes, they are moving towards FNPs staying out of the hospital role and being mainly outpatient primary care providers. There are still some FNPs working in hospital roles, especially if they were already working there, but new grad FNPs seem to have a harder time getting into the hospital.

You may be able to switch into an ACNP program at the same school or even a different school (most credits will transfer) if adult acute care is your true calling. FNPs do learn more about managing chronic conditions and less about emergency/acute issues you might see in the hospital, so if a hospital role is your passion you should switch to ACNP.

This is something I struggle with too. I wanted FNP but now feel ACNP will soon be higher demand.

BostonRN13

184 Posts

I disagree at least in the Boston market. I have two interviews this week for hospital FNP positions. I too never intended to work in primary care and leave my hospital experience behind..

BostonFNP, APRN

3 Articles; 5,581 Posts

Specializes in Adult Internal Medicine. Has 12 years experience.
I disagree at least in the Boston market. I have two interviews this week for hospital FNP positions. I too never intended to work in primary care and leave my hospital experience behind..
I work both hospital and primary. There is nothing better.

To the OP: Have you been accepted to and chose to matriculate in an FNP program? Which one?

phieud

61 Posts

I was accepted into Azusa Pacific University's direct entry FNP program. They don't offer a ACNP specialty at that university. Does anyone know how long it would take for to complete a post-masters in ACNP?

Specializes in Cardiac, ER. Has 18 years experience.

I'm in the midwest, we have tons of NP's working in the hospital,...we have several seeing pt's in our ER and almost every specialty has NP's !!

SlyFoxRN, BSN, RN

1 Article; 137 Posts

Has 1 years experience.

It also depends on your area. If you have a need for NPs hospital will be easier. If you're in a major city or Cali or NY it will be harder because nPs are oversaturated there.

BostonFNP, APRN

3 Articles; 5,581 Posts

Specializes in Adult Internal Medicine. Has 12 years experience.
With the consensus model' date=' yes, they are moving towards FNPs staying out of the hospital role and being mainly outpatient primary care providers. [/quote']

Anyone practicing will be grandfathered into whatever changes are made after 2015

Specializes in Pediatrics, High-Risk L&D, Antepartum, L. Has 15 years experience.
Anyone practicing will be grandfathered into whatever changes are made after 2015

That doesn't mean hospitals won't put their foot down. A local hospital here has made it clear that their hospital based NPs will have to get their acute care via a certificate program...one happens to be opening up in the area because of this. So if the hospital requires acute...grandfathering does nothing.

BostonFNP, APRN

3 Articles; 5,581 Posts

Specializes in Adult Internal Medicine. Has 12 years experience.
That doesn't mean hospitals won't put their foot down. A local hospital here has made it clear that their hospital based NPs will have to get their acute care via a certificate program...one happens to be opening up in the area because of this. So if the hospital requires acute...grandfathering does nothing.

True, certification and employer requirements are two separate things. I would suspect if a hospital was going to require all APRNs to have a AC certificate then those hospitals would pay for the program. Both hospitals I am credentialed at have, so far, said nothing would change for me as a direct-care provider unless I were to become a Hospitalist or a non-fast track ED provider.

But employers have done stranger things, though laying off experienced inpatient PCNPs and hiring new grad ACNPs would likely be a disservice to all.

Specializes in Pediatrics, High-Risk L&D, Antepartum, L. Has 15 years experience.
True' date=' certification and employer requirements are two separate things. I would suspect if a hospital was going to require all APRNs to have a AC certificate then those hospitals would pay for the program. Both hospitals I am credentialed at have, so far, said nothing would change for me as a direct-care provider unless I were to become a Hospitalist or a non-fast track ED provider. But employers have done stranger things, though laying off experienced inpatient PCNPs and hiring new grad ACNPs would likely be a disservice to all.[/quote']

I don't know if they plan to pay for it or not. I just know that the certificate program coming out is going hand in hand with the hospital requiring the AC. I wouldn't bet on the hospital paying...but it is certainly possible.