CSUS Sacramento State Fall 2018

Published

Effective Fall 2018, Sac State is changing their Selection Criteria for Admissions into the BSN program. I've created this thread for those folks that are planning on applying Fall 2018 to ask questions, share their thoughts, etc. I'm interested to know if the changes make it easier or harder to get accepted. I myself was planning on applying Fall 2018 but may decide to apply Spring 2018 if it's "easier" before the new changes are put into effect.

The selection criteria changes include NEW:

 Admission Point Assignments

 Minimum Admission Point Total

 Minimum Science GPA

 Adjusted Nursing GPA

 Standard Units

 Repeat Policy

 TEAS Points

 Optional Criteria Points

See info here:

http://www.csus.edu/hhs/nrs/programs/undergraduate/traditional/fall%202018%20admission%20criteria%20change%20docs/ei_nurs_5-10-17.pdf

cjprenurse

148 Posts

This gives me hope ☺️

Mom.to.3.boys

122 Posts

I am applying for the spring 2018 start. My points will go down with the new criteria. It will be interesting to see if the overall point selection goes up or down with the new criteria.

aksp

118 Posts

From what I read, the application process will now be done online now as well. No more hard copies.

justintimkim

29 Posts

My points go slightly down with the new criteria, but I have to take into account that it's out of 100 points now (instead of 112). I realized Thursday Sept 14th that I could still apply to the Spring 2018 program (deadline was extended to Sept. 15th), so I'll be doing that. If I don't get in, I'll just apply to the Fall 2018 program. Good luck to everyone!

justintimkim

29 Posts

Yes, I believe it would just be divided by 3. Assuming that Micro is your only "in-progress" science course

aksp

118 Posts

When calculating our GPA, do we omit our In Progress grade? For example, my In Progress course would be microbiology. So for the Science GPA, do we just divide it by 3 classes instead of 4? Or do we include it? Sorry if I sound confusing. http://www.csus.edu/hhs/nrs/programs/undergraduate/traditional/fall%202018%20admission%20criteria%20change%20docs/gpa_points_worksheet_5-8-17.pdf

That's the link for the new Fall 2018 criteria, if you're applying for Spring 2018, I don't think you use that handout.

When you fill out the application it will calculate it automatically.

Shmooptydoop

14 Posts

My question is why is the change occurring in the first place? I guess I take issue with it because I see the biggest advantage to this new format being heavily favored towards students who have done poorer in their pre-reqs/co-reqs than anything else. I think the de-emphasis of the TEAS is understandable, but not the "adjusted nursing" GPA. For example, I will have 12 completed courses for the fall 2018 application: 9 A's and 3 B's where the B's were in 3 unit courses (taken years ago) and all of the 5 and 4 unit courses and remaining 3 unit courses are A's. My previous calculated GPA (3.795) would have gotten me 36 points whereas my "adjusted" GPA (3.912) nets me 44 points. This sounds good on the surface until you realize that a student who also took 12 courses who got C's in two of the more important science courses (one 4 unit and one 5 unit per the previous system) can make a leap from a 3.581 GPA (22 points) to a 4.0 GPA (50 points)! This "adjusted" nursing GPA gave a massive point boost/advantage to a student who had a worse overall GPA/point total than someone like myself. And what about students who already were on track to get a 4.0? This essentially just increased the level of competitiveness for people who were less successful in their pre-reqs/co-reqs with ZERO benefit to those who were already topped out. This new points system in my opinion will only unfairly give an advantage to those who were actually less successful in their pre-reqs/co-reqs.

justintimkim

29 Posts

My question is why is the change occurring in the first place? I guess I take issue with it because I see the biggest advantage to this new format being heavily favored towards students who have done poorer in their pre-reqs/co-reqs than anything else. I think the de-emphasis of the TEAS is understandable, but not the "adjusted nursing" GPA. For example, I will have 12 completed courses for the fall 2018 application: 9 A's and 3 B's where the B's were in 3 unit courses (taken years ago) and all of the 5 and 4 unit courses and remaining 3 unit courses are A's. My previous calculated GPA (3.795) would have gotten me 36 points whereas my "adjusted" GPA (3.912) nets me 44 points. This sounds good on the surface until you realize that a student who also took 12 courses who got C's in two of the more important science courses (one 4 unit and one 5 unit per the previous system) can make a leap from a 3.581 GPA (22 points) to a 4.0 GPA (50 points)! This "adjusted" nursing GPA gave a massive point boost/advantage to a student who had a worse overall GPA/point total than someone like myself. And what about students who already were on track to get a 4.0? This essentially just increased the level of competitiveness for people who were less successful in their pre-reqs/co-reqs with ZERO benefit to those who were already topped out. This new points system in my opinion will only unfairly give an advantage to those who were actually less successful in their pre-reqs/co-reqs.

Hmm I see where you are coming from. I actually thought about it the other way around. I feel that it is now relying more on the TEAS and the "optional" component. For me, it makes sense. People go through different routes to get their pre and co reqs completed; it's not very uniform, at least in my opinion. That's why with this adjusted GPA, most people will get a 4.0. Now for the TEAS, everyone takes the "same" test, so it's a better marker of what you actually know. Just my 2 cents! And for the record, I don't think that getting into nursing school should rely on any of those "optional" criteria. For example, I come from a low-income family, but that doesn't mean I'm more qualified than another candidate who didn't grow up in a low-income household. I guess it just has to be this way, since it's so competitive these days.

aksp

118 Posts

My question is why is the change occurring in the first place? I guess I take issue with it because I see the biggest advantage to this new format being heavily favored towards students who have done poorer in their pre-reqs/co-reqs than anything else. I think the de-emphasis of the TEAS is understandable, but not the "adjusted nursing" GPA. For example, I will have 12 completed courses for the fall 2018 application: 9 A's and 3 B's where the B's were in 3 unit courses (taken years ago) and all of the 5 and 4 unit courses and remaining 3 unit courses are A's. My previous calculated GPA (3.795) would have gotten me 36 points whereas my "adjusted" GPA (3.912) nets me 44 points. This sounds good on the surface until you realize that a student who also took 12 courses who got C's in two of the more important science courses (one 4 unit and one 5 unit per the previous system) can make a leap from a 3.581 GPA (22 points) to a 4.0 GPA (50 points)! This "adjusted" nursing GPA gave a massive point boost/advantage to a student who had a worse overall GPA/point total than someone like myself. And what about students who already were on track to get a 4.0? This essentially just increased the level of competitiveness for people who were less successful in their pre-reqs/co-reqs with ZERO benefit to those who were already topped out. This new points system in my opinion will only unfairly give an advantage to those who were actually less successful in their pre-reqs/co-reqs.

Actually, in some ways it's more competitive than the current system. You are only allowed 3 repeats total, with only one of them being a science course. Additionally, third attempts will not be considered.

With the current criteria, people can retake any and all classes at least once with no penalty.

With this new system, even a student that has retaken 4 classes is now ineligible. And this is the case for the vast majority of applicants.

MintFarmer

3 Posts

The new system really benefited me in that it de-emphasizes the teas test. Hard to tell how it helps in actually getting accepted though because you can't compare stats with previously admitted students now that the point total is 100pt instead of 112