Not nursing related - page 2

I've seen several posts here, where the nurses state that the staff can sometimes be harder to deal with that the inmates. My son recently had to serve two weeks in a county jail for an old DWI... Read More

  1. by   banditrn
    Quote from tirzo13
    i have various views on incarceration.
    in some ways its like day camp, otherwise it does really seem demeaning and barbaric.
    anyway, the officers treat the Inmates better than i was treated in basic training for the military.
    they are more polite than my drill seargents.
    anyway, a mothers phone call to the warden will go along way.
    wardens hate those calls, often the IM will often get the problem fixed when mother makes the call.
    I often tell IM's when something is taking too long, or they are not getting what they need, to simply have mother call the warden, and then boom, the warden will often make sure the problem is fixed.
    My son was only in this county lock-up for a short time, and hopefully will never go back. There is no warden there - just the sheriff and the jailers - I don't want the problem fixed for just us, but for everyone that goes in there.

    I don't think inmates should be coddled - but basic cleanliness isn't 'coddling in my eyes. I suppose there are all sorts of 'rules' against it, but I don't know why the inmates themselves couldn't do the cleaning. And haven't we all been educated about the harmful effects that mold can have on people?

    Jails, just like nursing homes and hospitals collect state money - I don't understand why there isn't some agency that oversees them just like with anything else.
  2. by   fiestynurse
    If the place is that bad - call an ACLU attorney and get a class action suit going. Your son can initiate this.
  3. by   tirzo13
    I never worked for the county lock ups.
    Here at Salinas Valley State Prison it is nearly spotless.

    The inmates are always cleaning the place up, painting.
    They also take pride in their cells, they are usually very clean, clothes are wrinkle free.
    There are a few slobs, but the inmates themselves keep everything very nice.
    Course this prison is only 10 years old also, so that makes a difference.
    Maybe someobody at a old place like Folsom or San Quintin have a different story, maybe those places are filthy and beat down since they are so old.

    But if the inmates did not keep everything clean and polished who would? Money for staff is short all over, money for improvements is short all over.
  4. by   fiestynurse
    I think that cleanliness is important in the jails, not only for the inmates, but for the staff who have to have work there. I also think that inmates should be treated humanely. There are many watch dog groups and agencies that your son can report bad jail conditions to. I gave you two - The Public Health Department and the ACLU. Your son can also write his local county and state representatives. But, my point was - your energy would be better spent attending ALANON and taking care of yourself, rather than focusing on your son's miserable time in jail.

    ALANON has helped thousands of parents deal with their addicted children and it will help you and your son in his recovery. I am speaking from experience here, addiction effects the whole family. It doesn't mean that you are to blame for his addiction or that you are a bad mother.

    With that said, spending time in a not so nice jail is "rock bottom" for many addicts. It is what keeps them sober when they get out. I would rather have my son sitting in dirty underwear for a few weeks, then dead. This dirty disgusting jail with it's rude COs may have saved his life!!
  5. by   canoehead
    Two weeks in a disgusting jail (and no clean underwear) for a DUI? It's not nice, but I think he got off lucky. Did he at any point ask someone for a mop and bucket?
  6. by   banditrn
    Quote from fiestynurse
    I think that cleanliness is important in the jails, not only for the inmates, but for the staff who have to have work there. I also think that inmates should be treated humanely. There are many watch dog groups and agencies that your son can report bad jail conditions to. I gave you two - The Public Health Department and the ACLU. Your son can also write his local county and state representatives. But, my point was - your energy would be better spent attending ALANON and taking care of yourself, rather than focusing on your son's miserable time in jail.

    ALANON has helped thousands of parents deal with their addicted children and it will help you and your son in his recovery. I am speaking from experience here, addiction effects the whole family. It doesn't mean that you are to blame for his addiction or that you are a bad mother.

    With that said, spending time in a not so nice jail is "rock bottom" for many addicts. It is what keeps them sober when they get out. I would rather have my son sitting in dirty underwear for a few weeks, then dead. This dirty disgusting jail with it's rude COs may have saved his life!!
    He's been off the booze for almost 2 years! No, I no longer need to 'deal' with it - it's been dealt with - why do people insist on advising that, when that isn't what I asked in the first place.

    And you are right - I'm NOT to blame. While addiction is a factor in our family history, we raised our children in a good home. I 'educated' them at an early age about our family hx. As a family, we're supportive, but not floormats.

    I don't recall asking for advice about substance abuse - I've been trained in that area extensively.
    Last edit by banditrn on Dec 14, '06
  7. by   banditrn
    Quote from canoehead
    Two weeks in a disgusting jail (and no clean underwear) for a DUI? It's not nice, but I think he got off lucky. Did he at any point ask someone for a mop and bucket?

    Yes he did - it's not allowed!! And as with some others - I'm asking a general question about conditions in general! My son is done with his time - but what about others? Do you think every 'offense' deserves 'time' spent in a filthy jail?

    Your opinion as to whether my son got off 'lucky' or not is moot.
    Last edit by banditrn on Dec 14, '06
  8. by   ZASHAGALKA
    Unfortunately, the question is one of resources. We just don't spend that much of our tax dollars on things like sanitary conditions of jails. Or, more to the point, the people that tend to go to jail aren't nearly as vocal in the political process about where to spend precious resources.

    It shouldn't be that way, I agree. But, I also concede that, unless those running the jail take the time and effort to direct the inmates themselves to keep it clean, there is not likely to be a wholesale expenditure on hiring outside resources to do it.

    ~faith,
    Timothy.
  9. by   Ion
    If you are concerned then call the Sheriff who runs the jail. Maybe he will let you volunteer on your days off to come in and scrub the walls. Maybe there is more to the story like the inmates were on a lockdown and they couldn't let the porters out to clean. Maybe they are short staffed because no one will take the jobs and the county won't allow him the money to attract new people. Maybe the sheriff has a small budget and right now he needs to spend it on making sure staff and inmates walk out alive and he can't keep replacing garments that are frequently destroyed.

    Most people show up to work wanting to do a good job at their level of ability. I firmly believe in positive change through positive action. Talk to the folks running the place and see what you can do to help.
  10. by   banditrn
    Quote from Ion
    If you are concerned then call the Sheriff who runs the jail. Maybe he will let you volunteer on your days off to come in and scrub the walls. Maybe there is more to the story like the inmates were on a lockdown and they couldn't let the porters out to clean. Maybe they are short staffed because no one will take the jobs and the county won't allow him the money to attract new people. Maybe the sheriff has a small budget and right now he needs to spend it on making sure staff and inmates walk out alive and he can't keep replacing garments that are frequently destroyed.

    Most people show up to work wanting to do a good job at their level of ability. I firmly believe in positive change through positive action. Talk to the folks running the place and see what you can do to help.
    Assume that I know the sheriff and the bunch of them better than you do - but, I give up!! Just forget I even brought it up.
    Last edit by banditrn on Dec 15, '06
  11. by   sunnyjohn
    Banditrn,

    I am happy to hear your son has been sober for two years.

    I wish him continued success with his recovery!


    "God, Grant me the Serenity...."
  12. by   NurseAngie
    [QUOTE=banditrn;1945056][QUOTE=fiestynurse;1940443]
    the thought of wearing the same underwear for two weeks was disgusting to me!!

    Inmates are allowed to have fresh change of underwear. They purchase them new from the canteen (jail store, if you will) and wash them in the sink. Uniforms are exchanged weekly. I can not imagine how the laundry would ever keep up if it was done more frequently. Also, the inmates are permitted to clean their cells on a daily basis at the county jail where I work (there are unit workers that clean the general areas). Funny, but there are many that would rather call their mothers than pick up a broom. Sad, but true.
  13. by   fiestynurse
    banditrn - I am sorry that you did not get the responses that you wanted, but "Me thinkst you doeth protest too much."

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