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? about child abuse ctxt

Posted

Lets say this is a hypothetical situation. I do have Pediatrics next semester.

The student has a bandage on their arm. "That is where my dad hurt me with

scisscors."

What actions should a person take on suspected child abuse?

In a hospital setting/In a preschool setting/

What should a person do in this situation ?

What rules and regulations are there to protect children from abuse??

Just curious. I love kids but I hate those that harm them.

Thanks for any and all help!!

In the given scenario, albeit hypothetical, why would you automatically suspect abuse?

RainDreamer, BSN, RN

Specializes in NICU. Has 13 years experience.

Never assume anything.

Well, Never assume anything. Engage the child in conversation... don't ask leading questions. Clarify the situation....

Dad may not abused her.. perhaps he was trying to get a splinter out????

akcarmean, LPN

Specializes in Home Health Care,LTC.

I agree have a conversation (but not a leading one) find out more information. Keep an eye on the child if things still occur then you might suspect child abuse. By law as a nurse you are an mandated reported. But don't just jump to conclusions. Make sure there are more facts, documentation, and several incidents. Hope that helps. If I am wrong someone let me know. Thanks,

Angelia

Lets say this is a hypothetical situation. I do have Pediatrics next semester.

The student has a bandage on their arm. "That is where my dad hurt me with

scisscors."

What actions should a person take on suspected child abuse?

In a hospital setting/In a preschool setting/

What should a person do in this situation ?

What rules and regulations are there to protect children from abuse??

Just curious. I love kids but I hate those that harm them.

Thanks for any and all help!!

What u do is notify CPS immediatly so they can investigate. (Child Protective Services). As a RN you are required to report anything like this.

If you have reason to be concerned you should report it.

HappyNurse2005, RN

Specializes in LDRP.

but a child being hurt w/ scissors does not necessarily indicate abuse. ask the child more "what happened?" etc. maybe dad was cutting a string off her shirt, maybe dad was cutting and kid was running by and bumped into him, etc etc

it happens!don't assume until you know more

love, rose

Children will often leave out details and say things like "My daddy did this to me", until you prompt them for more information. Asking just a few questions will possibly indicate that what happened was an honest accident. There are so many different scenarios possible, but the hypothetical you gave was just not one that necessarily indicates abuse.

If you immediately jump to conclusions and notify CPS every single time a child says that his/her parent caused them injury, you're going to cause a lot of very serious problems for otherwise happy, normal families. (My son ended up in the ER with a laceration to his ear... told everyone his daddy cut him... failed to tell everyone that he was getting a haircut and jerked his head as daddy was trimming around the ear. See how this could have been a problem if people had made assumptions?) There are absolutely instances when calling CPS is warranted. But calling CPS every single time a child is injured by a parent without finding more information is just as wrong as not reporting true abuse.

You don't have to prove abuse even to yourself.

That said, talk to your clinical instructor and get her input on the situation too.

Remember, children are often coached by the abuser on what to tell people about their injuries. That statement might have been the child's only chance to bring attention to the problem without actually ratting out. And if you probe further you could very well get the pat answer the child's been told.

If you're in a school setting you can ask staff members if they've ever seen other suspicious signs or problems. If you're in a clinical setting there will be records on the number of times the child has been treated.

In most hospital settings, staff RNs report this kind of information to the treatment team (nurse manager, physician and social worker), and a group decision is made about how to proceed. Typically, one person is designated (usually the social worker) as the person to make reports to CPS if that is determined to be the most appropriate action. That way, everyone has an opportunity to share and consider information, and you avoid the possibility of having several different staff people independently report the same info on the same child ...

I would guess that the same policy applies in many school settings -- there is some process of group decision-making and a designated reporter.

As a student, your best action would be to talk to your clinical instructor about how to proceed.

i agree, never assume. talk to child, look how she behaves, how she talks about situations involving her father, how she talks about him. how she reacts if he is at room (scared, happy, waiting for him, avoiding), how she reacts if you say that he is coming. All verbal and nonverbal signs you need to consider and that your base to make judgment about her situation, and if there is anything to worry about.

lisamc1RN, LPN

Specializes in LTC/Behavioral/ Hospice. Has 4 years experience.

It's been my experience that children who are abused do not talk about it so freely. They are frightened by the consequences of talking. They have been taught to be silent. I would be more suspicious of the child who comes in, says it was an "accident" but for the most part is not very open. Children learn very quickly how to cover for their parent(s). I know I did.

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