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Certifications for new grads going into the ICU?

Posted

Has 1 years experience.

I am about to graduate from nursing school within a couple of months an will soon be applying to new graduate residency programs. I am very passionate about working in the ICU. Does anyone have any recommendations for certifications I should get before I start applying to ICU positions? I already have my BLS, ACLS, NIH stroke scale and ECG interpretation certifications. Any input would be very helpful!

RNNPICU, BSN, RN

Specializes in PICU. Has 13 years experience.

Those are great. Once you work for two years in the ICU you will be eligible for others. Not much else you can do now except apply to jobs. Since you are a new grad, the certifications may not make that much of a difference since you don't have the experience to even apply the certifications, however, I think it is a nice start. If you are thinking of Peds or NICU, there are two cources, PALS, and NRP, however, most of the time they are included in an orientation program.

Good Luck in your futuree.

You really don’t need those certifications to get into the ICU. I’m surprised you could even get ACLS. You legally can’t push meds yet so how did you do the mega code?

Many of those certifications won’t make sense until you actually work ICU. I started as a new grad in the ICU. I had zero certifications. I was a tech on my unit and I showed them that I was a hard worker and had the ability to be taught. That’s what we are looking for in new grads. People who are ready to learn and are adaptable.

2 hours ago, LovingLife123 said:

. ... I’m surprised you could even get ACLS. You legally can’t push meds yet so how did you do the mega code?

[...]

Why shouldn't he or she have been allowed to participate in an ACLS course?

soontobenewgrad2020

Has 1 years experience.

7 hours ago, LovingLife123 said:

You really don’t need those certifications to get into the ICU. I’m surprised you could even get ACLS. You legally can’t push meds yet so how did you do the mega code?

Many of those certifications won’t make sense until you actually work ICU. I started as a new grad in the ICU. I had zero certifications. I was a tech on my unit and I showed them that I was a hard worker and had the ability to be taught. That’s what we are looking for in new grads. People who are ready to learn and are adaptable.

I was able to get my ACLS through my work. I’m a tech at a hospital and the ACLS certification is required for all employees on my unit. It’s a trauma step down. I’ve heard that some hospitals in my area like to see prospective candidates have certifications because it shows an interest and dedication to the field you’re applying too. That’s why I’m wondering if there are any other certifications that would show that I am knowledgeable about the ICU

soontobenewgrad2020

Has 1 years experience.

9 hours ago, RNNPICU said:

Those are great. Once you work for two years in the ICU you will be eligible for others. Not much else you can do now except apply to jobs. Since you are a new grad, the certifications may not make that much of a difference since you don't have the experience to even apply the certifications, however, I think it is a nice start. If you are thinking of Peds or NICU, there are two cources, PALS, and NRP, however, most of the time they are included in an orientation program.

Good Luck in your futuree.

Thank you for your input! I did sign up for a PALS & NRP class, but it was cancelled due to COVID-19 ): If you have any other suggestions or online classes/certifications you think would be helpful please let me know!

5 hours ago, chare said:

Why shouldn't he or she have been allowed to participate in an ACLS course?

Because you push meds in the mega code. Each person has to take their turn in the mega code. That’s always been my experience. We all took turns in the roles.

25 minutes ago, soontobenewgrad2020 said:

I was able to get my ACLS through my work. I’m a tech at a hospital and the ACLS certification is required for all employees on my unit. It’s a trauma step down. I’ve heard that some hospitals in my area like to see prospective candidates have certifications because it shows an interest and dedication to the field you’re applying too. That’s why I’m wondering if there are any other certifications that would show that I am knowledgeable about the ICU

I work in a Trauma ICU. Our techs are not ACLS certified. They are all BLS certified. That’s why I’m confused.

1 hour ago, LovingLife123 said:
6 hours ago, chare said:

Why shouldn't he or she have been allowed to participate in an ACLS course?

Because you push meds in the mega code. Each person has to take their turn in the mega code. That’s always been my experience. We all took turns in the roles.

Pushing medications in the mega code isn't an issue, and having done so doesn't translate to being able to do so in actual practice. Nor does completing an ACLS course grant a certification, or confer any authority to conduct any procedure.

1 hour ago, LovingLife123 said:
1 hour ago, soontobenewgrad2020 said:

I was able to get my ACLS through my work. I’m a tech at a hospital and the ACLS certification is required for all employees on my unit. It’s a trauma step down. I’ve heard that some hospitals in my area like to see prospective candidates have certifications because it shows an interest and dedication to the field you’re applying too. That’s why I’m wondering if there are any other certifications that would show that I am knowledgeable about the ICU

I work in a Trauma ICU. Our techs are not ACLS certified. They are all BLS certified. That’s why I’m confused.

As for techs taking ACLS, if the facility or unit thinks this is worthwhile education for them, there is nothing that prohibits them from doing so.

From the American Heart Association Advanced Cardiovascular Life Support (ACLS) Course Options site:

Quote

ACLS is geared towards healthcare professionals who either direct or participate in the management of cardiopulmonary arrest or other cardiovascular emergencies or personnel in emergency response. Upon successful completion of the course, students receive a course completion card, valid for two years. Please contact your employer to ensure that you are selecting the correct course.

https://CPR.heart.org/en/courses/advanced-cardiovascular-life-support-course-options

brownbook

Has 36 years experience.

It's been quite a few years since I took it....but NRP is, was, just for the first few moments....minutes...or so right after birth. The resuscitated infant is quickly rushed to the NICU for further treatment.

Nothing wrong with taking NRP, but probably other things you could study, brush up on, that would be more pertinent to working in ICU