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Central line compatibility

Critical   (3,528 Views | 15 Replies)
by mfarmer88 mfarmer88 (New) New

872 Profile Views; 10 Posts

You are reading page 2 of Central line compatibility. If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

Been there,done that has 33 years experience as a ASN, RN.

4 Followers; 6,256 Posts; 69,933 Profile Views

Did the director actually "yell" at you? That would be problem # 1.

Not having even confidence in your skills to calmly explain the rationale of using multi-lumen central lines is problem # 2.

So what did you do with the drips?

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Creamsoda is a ASN, RN and specializes in ICU.

724 Posts; 12,295 Profile Views

if you know for sure that your drips were seperate....write an incident report for unprofessional behavior. They are out of line. They need to get their attitude in check.

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sjalv has 1 years experience and specializes in CVICU.

897 Posts; 12,283 Profile Views

Did you clarify what you know to be the truth, i.e. that the lumens are separate and even if the medications are incompatible, they are fine to infuse through separate lumens?

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Ruby Vee has 40 years experience as a BSN and specializes in CCU, SICU, CVSICU, Precepting & Teaching.

11 Followers; 66 Articles; 13,949 Posts; 172,651 Profile Views

Sounds vaguely Kafkaesque.

Answer 1a: Yes, central lines are designed so that non-compatible medications can be run through different lumens at the same time. Each lumen has its own discreet path through the catheter until exiting into a large blood vessel.

Answer 1b: The nurses in an ICU know this. We couldn't do our jobs without knowing this. Maybe if it was just one newbie berating you, we could chalk it up to a mistake on her part, but not a whole bunch of ICU nurses. So I'm wondering if something was lost in translation here. Are you certain you were administering the medications through different ports of a central line, and not just through something like a y-connector or stop-cock rig hooked up to a single port? I know I've seen nurses administer non-compatible medications through a y-connector hooked up to an EJ (peripheral) line, falsely believing that the y-connector made it two different ports.

Or could they be working under an antiquated policy and really not know the lines are designed to run incompatible drugs through different lumens?

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