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Caring for almost 400lb Quad

Posted

I've been taking care of this patient for a 3 days and I'm exhausted. The patient is dead weight, can't grab or help at all. The tech, me, and another RN ached after doing all her care today. We used a ceiling lift but it takes a lot of muscles to turn, to lift the legs to clean, to pull and push to roll, etc. Since she is big, we had to push/pull her to a side before each turn and it takes many turns to get the pants and shirts on right. I was lucky to get the third person to help in the afternoon. In the morning it was just me for a while, but I was able to get a tech to help afterwards. We don't have enough man power for this basically and I probably have to care for her again tomorrow. I took some Aleve after I finished with her morning care cos my back started to hurt. Anyone has a tip on how to work with a large new quad patient?

No tips for how to care for the patient with little to no help, but you should suggest to whom ever is assigning pt's that she is a lot of work and see if it would be possible to rotate her with staff to give your body healing time and to ensure that no one staff memeber injures themselves in the process of caring for her.

laKrugRN

Specializes in Cardiac, ER, Pediatrics, Corrections.

Well, my idea was going to be a Hoyer lift, but sounds like you have tried it. Yikes. So sad that people get like that! I would hate to require 3+ people to help me perform my daily activities! Hope you figure something out for your back's sake! Don't ruin your back over it! You need it! ;)

If your back is already hurting after that care ask to be reassigned for a few days secondary to this pain.

If your employer refuses take yourself to urgent care for your muscle spasms and back pain and then repeat your request with your employer.

You did not make care promises to this patient, your employer did.

Been there,done that, ASN, RN

Has 33 years experience.

The plan of care must be re-evaluated.

It is unsafe for the patient and the caregiver to provide care with one person. Even with two caregivers, the ergodynamics must be carefully evaluated and planned.

If your agency does not agree... you must decline the assignment. 38 % of nurses have chronic back injuries.. don't join that group.

No tips for how to care for the patient with little to no help, but you should suggest to whom ever is assigning pt's that she is a lot of work and see if it would be possible to rotate her with staff to give your body healing time and to ensure that no one staff memeber injures themselves in the process of caring for her.
Yes, share the wealth.

Karou

Specializes in Med-Surg. Has 1 years experience.

Are you working home health, LTC, or in the hospital?

Do y'all have hover mats? They are inflatable and go under the patient. Once positioned, you inflate them with air via a portable plug in compressor. It makes turning and pulling a patient up in bed so much easier. The mats can go down to laundry if soiled as well. Is this patient on a bariatric bed? Do you have beds that can turn your patients scheduled?

Agree that the care plan needs to be revised for this patient... Even with a ceiling lift she requires more care providers.

Thanks for all the input. I'm at a Rehab facility. Now that you mentioned a hover mat, I remember using it in the ICU. I'm going to bring that up at work. And today I had 2 people to help and we put a foley in last night so it was much better than the past 3 days. This patient would probably end up in LTC. I'm going to look at the bed as well. Thanks again.