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Bullying in nursing field does exist

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by Dianna11 Dianna11 (Member)

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146 Posts; 4,154 Profile Views

It does. You can find the ignore list in settings.

Thanks you! Found it and used it. :)

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heron has 40 years experience as a ASN, RN and specializes in Hospice.

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Fair enough, but it was an honest mistake, considering my past interactions with that poster. Also, she just said in this thread that she "thought AA was Alcoholic Anonymous". Yah right, sure! That's what she "thought".

I wish AN had an ignore function.

Actually, AA as short for alcoholic's anonymous has been standard usage as long as AA has been around - far longer than the term African American, which cropped up sometime in the eighties, I think.

When you sneer at Ruby's misunderstanding, aren't you displaying the same behavior as the "bully" in your original post?

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TriciaJ has 39 years experience as a RN and specializes in Psych, Corrections, Med-Surg, Ambulatory.

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Fair enough, but it was an honest mistake, considering my past interactions with that poster. Also, she just said in this thread that she "thought AA was Alcoholic Anonymous". Yah right, sure! That's what she "thought".

I wish AN had an ignore function.

AA does stand for Alcoholics Anonymous. That's what it has always stood for. I'd be careful using acronyms to refer to people's demographics. In this hypersensitive climate, it could be construed as racism.

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146 Posts; 4,154 Profile Views

AA does stand for Alcoholics Anonymous. That's what it has always stood for. I'd be careful using acronyms to refer to people's demographics. In this hypersensitive climate, it could be construed as racism.

Using acronyms now can be construed as "racism"? That's just silly! But nothing surprises me on this site anymore, to be honest. :***:

Edited by Dianna11

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146 Posts; 4,154 Profile Views

When you sneer at Ruby's misunderstanding, aren't you displaying the same behavior as the "bully" in your original post?

No, because that is not the only thing she said, and I highly doubt she "misunderstood", considering everything else she posted in this thread.

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heron has 40 years experience as a ASN, RN and specializes in Hospice.

1 Follower; 2,533 Posts; 38,984 Profile Views

No, because that is not the only thing she said, and I highly doubt she "misunderstood", considering everything else she posted in this thread.

Uh huh. Considering everything else you've posted in this thread, it's sounding like you demand far more benefit of the doubt than you're willing to give anyone else. As for the "AA" acronym, that's a whole 'nother thread. Consider, though, how it would feel to have your ethnic identity (assuming you're Caucasian) referred to as WG or DAH. The question is moot, however, since AN is the only place I've seen it used as short for African American.

Meanwhile, since I happen to agree with Ruby that the one-sided description of events presented in the OP does not rise to the level of bullying, please put me on your ignore list as well.

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Shortcake_BSn has 1 years experience and specializes in Emergency Room, Critical care.

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Speaking as an AA woman, I clearly understood what the acronym meant and I know that it was not used in a "racist way". I don't understand why people are so ruffled by the fact that she felt bullied. Clearly, the young woman did target her as non-English speaking person. She has a right to learn just as much as the next student. Everyone knows how hard nursing school is. I'm sure that it's amplified when it's being taught in a language other than your primary language. Yes. She could have tried to arrange one on one time with her instructors, but that still doesn't give anyone the right to give her grief because she wasn't comprehending.

Furthermore, I get so sick of people stating that "the word bully gets thrown around too often." No, the victims of bullying get ignored too often by people who do not believe that they victimization falls under their criteria of what bullying is. Bullying is subjective and suicide is real. Never minimize the actions of someone that is clearly getting pleasure for making someone feel different.

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146 Posts; 4,154 Profile Views

From perspective of instructor (who is also a student)-- most of the time if a student has a question, more students (if not most or all of the group) have a similar question and it is good to address as a whole class. In fact many students seem to be glad that another student asked their question. So some things that I might not have made clear are good to discuss with everyone together.

However, sometimes a student- such as yourself, who is ESL/EAL- might have additional questions or need to clarify, which would be good to meet with the instructor to discuss one-on-one. I would suggest making an appointment with your instructor to do this. There is no excuse for your classmate to be rude to you however. But by scheduling a personal meeting you will be sure to get what you need without a classmate's judgment.

Unfortunately, I didn't. She took me by surprise and I merely asked her what was that all about. She kept going on it, in front of another student (it was 3 of us on the same table).

I don't judge people by one thing only. This happened for almost all last year of nursing school, same person, and her friend, whenever we had classes/clinical together.

I understand that this is not exclusive to nursing field, bit there are some here who claim that bullying doesn't exist in our field, and that people who complain about it are taking things out of proportion.

I can confidently say that's not the case. I have never experienced bullying before nursing school ( guess I was lucky). The only two places I have is NS and online, from various self centered individuals who like to put other posters down with no reason.

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146 Posts; 4,154 Profile Views

What is AA?

African American.

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146 Posts; 4,154 Profile Views

Uh huh. Considering everything else you've posted in this thread, it's sounding like you demand far more benefit of the doubt than you're willing to give anyone else. As for the "AA" acronym, that's a whole 'nother thread. Consider, though, how it would feel to have your ethnic identity (assuming you're Caucasian) referred to as WG or DAH. The question is moot, however, since AN is the only place I've seen it used as short for African American.

Meanwhile, since I happen to agree with Ruby that the one-sided description of events presented in the OP does not rise to the level of bullying, please put me on your ignore list as well.

Sorry I stood up to your and your BFF. Have a nice day.

Edited by Dianna11

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146 Posts; 4,154 Profile Views

Speaking as an AA woman, I clearly understood what the acronym meant and I know that it was not used in a "racist way". I don't understand why people are so ruffled by the fact that she felt bullied. Clearly, the young woman did target her as non-English speaking person. She has a right to learn just as much as the next student. Everyone knows how hard nursing school is. I'm sure that it's amplified when it's being taught in a language other than your primary language. Yes. She could have tried to arrange one on one time with her instructors, but that still doesn't give anyone the right to give her grief because she wasn't comprehending.

Furthermore, I get so sick of people stating that "the word bully gets thrown around too often." No, the victims of bullying get ignored too often by people who do not believe that they victimization falls under their criteria of what bullying is. Bullying is subjective and suicide is real. Never minimize the actions of someone that is clearly getting pleasure for making someone feel different.

Thank you so much for understanding where I am coming from.

*hugs*

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heron has 40 years experience as a ASN, RN and specializes in Hospice.

1 Follower; 2,533 Posts; 38,984 Profile Views

Speaking as an AA woman, I clearly understood what the acronym meant and I know that it was not used in a "racist way". I don't understand why people are so ruffled by the fact that she felt bullied. Clearly, the young woman did target her as non-English speaking person. She has a right to learn just as much as the next student. Everyone knows how hard nursing school is. I'm sure that it's amplified when it's being taught in a language other than your primary language. Yes. She could have tried to arrange one on one time with her instructors, but that still doesn't give anyone the right to give her grief because she wasn't comprehending.

Furthermore, I get so sick of people stating that "the word bully gets thrown around too often." No, the victims of bullying get ignored too often by people who do not believe that they victimization falls under their criteria of what bullying is. Bullying is subjective and suicide is real. Never minimize the actions of someone that is clearly getting pleasure for making someone feel different.

What I question is not the reality of bullying, but just exactly who the bully is, here.

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