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BREASTFEEDING

Ob/Gyn   (1,833 Views | 9 Replies)

982 Profile Views; 25 Posts

Hello, I'd first like to give slight background on my story. I am 27 years old and I am attempting to get into the nursing field. It has been the only field I have been passionate about since I thought about what I wanted to be as a child. I was told my my instructor for the CNA program that it is better to go up the ladder than jumping right into an RN program. I'd like to know how true that is and if it is helpful. Ultimately my goal is to be a L&D Nurse. Anyway, I have been breastfeeding my son since birth and he is now almost 15 months. I am trying to ween him off by offering milk in his cup, offering more meals and snacks but it's like he just wont respond to it. What should I do?

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klone has 14 years experience as a MSN, RN and specializes in Women's Health/OB Leadership.

6 Followers; 13,558 Posts; 118,949 Profile Views

I'm sorry, but we cannot give you medical advice. I would recommend contacting a lactation consultant or La Leche League Leader in your community. Good luck.

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25 Posts; 982 Profile Views

I'm sorry, but we cannot give you medical advice. I would recommend contacting a lactation consultant or La Leche League Leader in your community. Good luck.

Thank u...How about as far as the nursing ladder. Any information or tips on that?

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101 Posts; 6,744 Profile Views

I would recommend going straight into an RN program. Does she mean go from CNA, to LVN, then RN? In my opinion, it would be a waste of time to "go up the ladder". Especially in L&D, the majority of the job we do, only RN's can perform. I'm in a small rural hospital so we don't have LVN's or CNA's on our floor. I think in large hospitals, CNA's might be utilized, but I don't think LVN's. Either way, to learn L&D, you need to be an RN.

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BlueRidgeModonda has 6 years experience as a BSN and specializes in L&D, RNC-OB, now Circulating in the Main OR.

19 Posts; 961 Profile Views

I think it depended on your state/school requirements. Most CC's here in NC require your CNA before even applying to their ADN programs. If you want to be an RN, go for your RN. Just research your school's requirements for admission into their program.

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klone has 14 years experience as a MSN, RN and specializes in Women's Health/OB Leadership.

6 Followers; 13,558 Posts; 118,949 Profile Views

I was told my my instructor for the CNA program that it is better to go up the ladder than jumping right into an RN program.

I don't agree with your CNA instructor. Is it helpful? Sure - any clinical experience you have will only help. Is it BETTER? Nah. If you know you want to be an L&D nurse, then just apply for an RN program. No need to go CNA-LPN-RN.

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APL&D has 8 years experience.

22 Posts; 1,266 Profile Views

The advice I give everyone that is considering becoming a nurse is to go to an RN program, preferably to a 4-year college, where you can graduate with a BSN. Looking back, I wish I had done that. I am actually kicking myself for not having done that. So if you have money and a 4-year college nearby, go for it. You will have a better opportunity for hire with Bachelors. Good luck.

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25 Posts; 982 Profile Views

I appreciate all of the advice, I think I will take my chances and just apply to the BSN program I have my eyes on. Maybe it will be better for me since I am interested in Labor & Delivery.

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cayenne06 has 10 years experience as a MSN, CNM and specializes in Reproductive & Public Health.

1,394 Posts; 18,630 Profile Views

I don't think advice about weaning can be called medical advice. That falls squarely under parenting advice IMO, unless there is a medical issue we don't know about.

OP- congrats for nursing for so long! I breastfed my kiddos for almost 3 years each. Does your son still nurse at night? if so, I would cut that out first. For me, I had to stop cosleeping and let their dad take over night time parenting for a few weeks (usually we split it 50/50).

For daytime nursing, I would distract and delay. Offer water/milk when they ask to nurse, or tell them you will nurse them when you finish xyz. Often they will forget! I guess the real question is, do you want to wean completely, or just cut down? And why do you want to wean? The answers to those questions will help you figure out the best way to accomplish it.

A good resource: Weaning : KellyMom

As far as your other question, I also agree with the previous posters that going straight for your RN is best, if you can.

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25 Posts; 982 Profile Views

He still nurses at night every once in awhile, but not for a long period of time. I think he mainly wants to know I'm there. And since we still co-sleep that probably contributes to it as well. I often use the distracting and delaying method, which works most of the time. Until he's tired of me putting him off and becomes extremely fussy. My main reason for weaning is the attachment he has to me. It's very hard for him to stay with anybody except me, which makes it difficult for work and school. I don't want to rush him completely before he's ready, but I want more of a balance, especially with me being away

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