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Better to take an actual "PCT" class or just Phlebotomy??

Technicians   (26,151 Views 9 Comments)
by EthnicBeauty EthnicBeauty (New Member) New Member

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Hello, I hope someone has a bit of advice for me on this one. I just finished my CNA certification (yay!) and had planned to take a PCT course immediately after so I would be able to work in a hospital and make a little bit more money before I enter an LPN program. I also do not have the desire to work in a nursing home at this time.

One of the nice ladies I had in my CNA course is now in the PCT course and has said it is not what she expected at all. We were both under the impression that after finishing the PCT course one would be able to get a job as a phlebotomist as well as a PCT therefore opening up more doors for employment. My friend informed me that it wouldn't really work that way because in the PCT course you only get about 2 weeks of phlebotomy and no externship which is required to get a job as a phlebotomist. My question is then, would it be better to just take a phlebotomy course? Wouldn't that make more sense or am I missing something? I also heard you can learn EKG (the other main part of the PCT course) in about 10 minutes. Now I realize a lot of my information is hearsay ... that's why I'm hoping someone can shed some light for me. :) Can you still get hired as a PCT by taking a CNA class and a phlebotomy class or would it look better to have taken the PCT course??

Thank you so much for responding, I just finished the certification so my mind is still going a mile a minute!

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gymnut works as a Oncology Tech.

7,003 Visitors; 246 Posts

I would actually like to know this as well because my CNA class does not teach phlebotomy or EKG but they have additional classes at the college that you could take to get certified in them. I thought I would enroll in these rather than waiting around for a hospital to hire me on and teach me these things.

Actually that is one thing you can do. Call local hospitals and ask if they are offering any entry level tech programs. I know one hospital up my way has tech training for anyone (CNA or not) and the other offers CNAs to become techs after they get hired.

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577 Visitors; 1 Post

i just got my cna license in my mail this morning, after five weeks, 6 hours a day cna course in manhattan, and a written and skill exam as a national certification. that there is no ekg or phleb in this course. witch those, i had to go to another course that i took in one month with every day pratice for both phleb and ekg. in the end of this course, for phleb only, they ask 120 hours and a minimum of 25 draws in a externship. this friday i'm going to pct national certification exam. two hundred questions just waiting for me, that include cna, ekg and phleb subjects. if you want to get a pct license in nyc, that is the right path to follow.

Edited by M A D P

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juliaann has 1 years experience and works as a ICU Nurse.

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If you want to do phleb, take a phleb course. If you want to be a PCT, take a PCT course. PCT courses do not prepare you to immediately enter the workforce as a phlebotomist and CNA + phleb course does not equal PCT, so no, you likely would not have double the job opportunities. Choose the one you want, or do both.

Yes, anyone can learn to do an EKG in about 10 minutes. But to understand how it works, the equipment, the physiology and to understand what you're looking at, you need much more. If you're just working as a PCT in a hospital chances are no one cares if you know any more than how to put the electrodes in the right place and push "capture." But speaking as a CV tech, actually knowing what's going on, being able to recognize rhythms and rhythm changes, know what elevation and depression in which leads means what, and being able to know when the machine's interpretation is WRONG (and they are sometimes) is really important. Plus this will be important if you ever want to work as a monitor tech, or if you further your education in healthcare. Basic dysrhythmia can be taught in a few days but takes constant use to become familiar and easy. Many people (including nurses) struggle with basic rhythm analysis. So if you want to be a CV tech or a competent EKG tech, really learning EKG is important. Most hospitals will provide this more in-depth training, though.

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NiquiCNA has 10 years experience and works as a CNA.

1,431 Visitors; 37 Posts

You likely can work in the hospital without your PCT or phlebotomy. Our hospital hires monstly CNAs for the floors, we do everything the PCTs do except the lab draws, which the lab comes up to get. Some of the CNAs have gotten trained for EKGs also, but as a CNA we still do catheters and blood sugars, they will train you and check you off to do it. The pay is much better than LTC and the atmosphere is much different.

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KaTers419 works as a PCT, Unit Clerk, Monitor Tech.

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I got hired at my hospital as a CNA, they offer a PCT class that takes 3 days and they pay you for going. They only taught Dry Sterile dressing changes, caths and reseal removal. Our hospital has a separate dept for Phlebotomy and do not train us in it. From what I hear from other friends that work in hospitals they have run into the same thing. Also we are trained how to do a EKG and are able to sign up for a class to learn it and become a Mon Tech on the Tele floor.

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NHanCI works as a .. .Medical Receptionist.

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In FL (Broward County Area), the terms CNA & PCT are interchangable. PCT's however, have additional training in Phlebotomy & EKG [[TRAINING- but aren't certified in those areas]]..

If you are already certified in CNA I would recommend taking a Phlebotomy & EKG course and become certified. It looks great on your resume, and the pay rate is a bit higher. Hospitals would hire you as PCT or a PCNA. The more certifications you get, the more marketable you are.

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5,529 Visitors; 274 Posts

Either class is probably of equal value. As an above poster said, if you want to be a PCT in a hospital, take a PCT class, and if you want to make yourself marketable as an EKG tech or a Phlebotomist, take classes that specify in those areas. Especially if you live in an area where you can get all of this training affordably at a CC - go for it. Just try to avoid these places that take your money and don't teach you anything. Although if you plan on being a nurse maybe you don't want to spend so much time taking extra vocational classes.

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452 Visitors; 1 Post

Hello, I hope someone has a bit of advice for me on this one. I just finished my CNA certification (yay!) and had planned to take a PCT course immediately after so I would be able to work in a hospital and make a little bit more money before I enter an LPN program. I also do not have the desire to work in a nursing home at this time.

One of the nice ladies I had in my CNA course is now in the PCT course and has said it is not what she expected at all. We were both under the impression that after finishing the PCT course one would be able to get a job as a phlebotomist as well as a PCT therefore opening up more doors for employment. My friend informed me that it wouldn't really work that way because in the PCT course you only get about 2 weeks of phlebotomy and no externship which is required to get a job as a phlebotomist. My question is then, would it be better to just take a phlebotomy course? Wouldn't that make more sense or am I missing something? I also heard you can learn EKG (the other main part of the PCT course) in about 10 minutes. Now I realize a lot of my information is hearsay ... that's why I'm hoping someone can shed some light for me. :) Can you still get hired as a PCT by taking a CNA class and a phlebotomy class or would it look better to have taken the PCT course??

Thank you so much for responding, I just finished the certification so my mind is still going a mile a minute!

Hello,

The best is to get certified in each thing. I just finished CNA and got a certificate (not State Certified), i am currently in Phlebotomy and after I finish my 100 sticks in clinical I will sit for the board and become certified. Same with ECG.. I want to be certified in each field and then at the end sit for the PCT test to give me my certificate in PCT. I would like to get a job in Phlebotomy but I will take PCT to get my foot in the door. My teacher just told us in class that if you are working as a Phlebotomist the best way to land on a more permanent floor is to have your PCT. The best thing is being able to put on your resume that you are certified in each field. That will make you more marketable. ((Also a certification in CPR is helpful)). When I finish with Phlebotomy I will sign up for ECG next. It's been a journey, but it will be worth it. Hope this helps! AC

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