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background check

I have a question about background checks. Should someone answer yes to the question of convictions if they can pass any background check? If someone was caught shoplifting 25 years ago though they never went to jail or was fingerprinted or anything like that-just went to the magistrate's office and paid a fine, should they say yes to the question? This person can pass a state SLED check, a local check, and even the check through the college for nursing through the company PRECHECK. What would you do?:confused:

I would probably answer NO. If there is no paperwork on it... But if there is, then I would answer YES and provide a brief explanation.

good luck!

Phyllis

Nazarite

Specializes in Rehab., Home Health, Geriatrics, MR/DD.

I don't know if I would answer no and if discovered it would appear they lied....you didn't mention if they passed an NCIC check....that is the FBI background check......that is the check that counts........honesty is always the best policy, rather than having to try to explain after checking no, when the truth was yes.....just food for thought......

Does anyone know what they check for?

I am wondering if they check credit and traffic tickets.

My background check should be fine but my credit looks a little sad and I have had a black cloud for tickets sine 2000 - Actually since after dating a cop! I really think he did this because I never used to get tickets.

rough question

is there a site that you could go to and determine if you have anything on record??

i think that a lot would depend on age, if under 18 the records are frequently sealed or expunged

sirI, MSN, APRN, NP

Specializes in Education, FP, LNC, Forensics, ED, OB.

If you were indeed arrested and convicted (pled guilty); then paid a fine secondary to the conviction, yes, you need to check 'yes' to the BON question.

With the BON, even sealed/expunged records can be subject.

Honesty is the best policy.

Definitely best to be honest. If you are not and the BON or a potential employer finds out, that by itself can be reason to deny licensure or a job.

medsurgrnco, BSN, RN

Specializes in Med-Surg, Psych.

You can call worker's comp to see if there is any record of a claim. If the claim was before computers popped up everywhere, there might not be a record. Other than that, all I can recommend is doing one of the background checks available on the internet to see what turns up.

RNgirlie

Specializes in med-surg, BICU.

better be honest. you will never be able to redeem yourself after lying openly.

Siri is correct. You have more to risk by being dishonest than by fessing up now. It is not so much that you did this that will hold you back as it is your integrity in the aftermath.

Nursing is NOT the only job like this. I knew someone who applied for a truck driving job. He forgot about a charge that he had. It was a paperwork error, in some record keeping he was required to do by a federal agency for the field he was in. (not related to truck driving). This error in no way implicated him to any wrong doing but it was something he had to record and did not. His records were audited and he had a fine and dropped charge against him. He did not get the truck driving job. They told him it was not because he had this dropped charge but because he essentially lied about it.

A lie of omission even unintentional is still a lie.

My guess is you will still get your license if you fess up this happened a long time ago and apparently was a minor incident. They do take that and other things into consideration. Yet, lying is not overlooked. Sooner or later this may come back to haunt you.

medsurgrnco, BSN, RN

Specializes in Med-Surg, Psych.

I agree with others that it usually is best to be honest. I can't imagine still getting the job after you're caught in a lie.

I have a question about background checks. Should someone answer yes to the question of convictions if they can pass any background check? If someone was caught shoplifting 25 years ago though they never went to jail or was fingerprinted or anything like that-just went to the magistrate's office and paid a fine, should they say yes to the question? This person can pass a state SLED check, a local check, and even the check through the college for nursing through the company PRECHECK. What would you do?:confused:

Often times paying a fine and not getting in trouble leaves you record clean.

If it was before 18 - it is not available.

You can do a check on yourself through

www.whitepages.com for $59.95

I don't know how good it is. I know I used it a few years ago to locate someone but I didn't do the extensive background check.

I was thinking of checking to see what comes up on me. I really want to know what employers get. I think I am going to call my previous employer and ask them. We are entitled to our records. I have to go that way on Friday. I'll see if I can get it and tell you what mine had in it.

You can probably also contact that court and ask for the information under freedom of information act. My bet would be that your record is clear.

Often times courts just want your money. If you don't have a record they usually just take your money and don't put anything on your record. Not that they don't ever do the opposite, but that is what they usually do. If you had no priors and no records they probably let it go with the payment of the fine.

If you paid a fine, then you pleaded guilty, and if someone digs enough, they can find the record.

You were still arrested...people don't realize when you get a speeding ticket, you are given the ticking "in lieu of" an arrest. That is why if you refuse to sign it, they will take you to jail.

Most commercial background check companies only go back 7 years or so.

However, STATE agencies, the military, the government, etc...has access to go as far back as they wish.

I would not lie about that. Maybe if you were applying for a job at Walmart, but not when applying for a license with the state.

medsurgrnco, BSN, RN

Specializes in Med-Surg, Psych.

I was thinking of checking to see what comes up on me. I really want to know what employers get. I think I am going to call my previous employer and ask them. We are entitled to our records.

I just called the labor board in my state. Personnel files are unfortunately considered the private property of the employer, and if you are no longer an employee you need a subpoena to see those records. Suggest you check for the situation in the state in which you reside. For anyone currently employed, you might want to look at your personnel file periodically to see what's in there that you don't know about.

I had tax liens years ago when I was more of a rebel, and it never prevented me from getting jobs. But that fell off my record before I became a nurse. Other than that, I never got caught at anything so my record was completely clean (other than a couple of speeding tickets).

I just called the labor board in my state. Personnel files are unfortunately considered the private property of the employer, and if you are no longer an employee you need a subpoena to see those records. Suggest you check for the situation in the state in which you reside. For anyone currently employed, you might want to look at your personnel file periodically to see what's in there that you don't know about.

I had tax liens years ago when I was more of a rebel, and it never prevented me from getting jobs. But that fell off my record before I became a nurse. Other than that, I never got caught at anything so my record was completely clean (other than a couple of speeding tickets).

I couldn't find my BCLS cert and had to call my last employer and ask for a copy. What they told me was, "Yes, you are entitled to all of your records, they are your records." They also told me that they had requested my file from the floor manager which was mine as well.

The job before that, I asked for my records and they told me that they were mine but I had to give them 3 days to get them "ready" for me. I did pick them up. There wasn't anything bad in there.

Now, those records didn't have the background check that I remember. Obviously there are two sets of "records:" The personal file and ??

Calling them is on my list of things to do. It will be interesting.

I just called the labor board in my state. Personnel files are unfortunately considered the private property of the employer, and if you are no longer an employee you need a subpoena to see those records. Suggest you check for the situation in the state in which you reside. For anyone currently employed, you might want to look at your personnel file periodically to see what's in there that you don't know about.

I had tax liens years ago when I was more of a rebel, and it never prevented me from getting jobs. But that fell off my record before I became a nurse. Other than that, I never got caught at anything so my record was completely clean (other than a couple of speeding tickets).

In my state this is not true , the employer must provide the employee or ex employee with their personnel file within a certain number of days.

Here is a link to all the states access laws on personnel files.

http://www.ahipubs.com/reports/persaccess.pdf

sirI, MSN, APRN, NP

Specializes in Education, FP, LNC, Forensics, ED, OB.

The thing is, however (dealing with BON), "have you ever been convicted of XYZ?"

If you have, then you must answer truthfully. One can always attach a declaration for that's how most BONs operate. It's not really "can I do a background check on myself and find (or not find) the offense so I don't have to answer the question...??"

I still advocate honesty with the question. Like another poster pointed out, I feel sure this will all work out for the OP, but better to answer the question.

They actually check for previous names, whether you are a registered sex offender, and of course criminal records.

I work in the Hiring process and would not expect you to answer "yes" in that case

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