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Associate vs Bachelor Nursing

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by browtif2 browtif2 (New) New

307 Profile Views; 6 Posts

I am doing a survey for my school. Please comment below on my questions. If you have anything to add I would love to hear about it. Thank you!

1. I would like to know peoples thoughts on the differences between associate degree nurses and bachelor degree nurses. Do they provide different care is there knowledge base less?

2. Do you think that it is right that hospitals will turn away Associate Degree Nurses just because they have an associate degree?

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roser13 has 17 years experience as a ASN, RN and specializes in Med/Surg, Ortho, ASC.

6,504 Posts; 51,089 Profile Views

Have you searched this topic here on AN.com? There is an exhaustive number of threads.

Did your homework assignment intend for you to "research" the Internet or to actually interview nurses? Keep in mind that your instructor may well be a member here. Most instructors do not expect students to "interview" online folks who may or may not be actual nurses.

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Pangea Reunited has 6 years experience as a ASN, RN.

1,547 Posts; 21,390 Profile Views

1. While working among my peers, I can't tell who has a BSN verses ASN by performance. Do BSNs have more knowledge? Possibly. I assume (hope!) that I would learn something new if I went to school for a few extra years.

2. It's not wrong. If a hospital can hire an equally experienced candidate with more education for the same amount of money, why would they choose not to?

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NurseSpeedy has 18 years experience as a ADN, LPN, RN.

1,361 Posts; 18,295 Profile Views

1. A diploma, associate's, or bachelor's will all take the SAME NCLEX-RN to determine if they are safe to practice nursing. Working in the hospital in the past, I could not tell the difference between which was which unless they decided to share that information in conversation or displayed it on their name tag.

2. Whether I think it is right or wrong is irrelevant. If I want to work for a hospital that requires a BSN, then I would have to obtain a BSN.

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macawake has 10 years experience.

1,101 Posts; 72,377 Profile Views

I am doing a survey for my school. Please comment below on my questions.

OP, what are your own thoughts on the matter?

is there knowledge base less?

I would certainly hope that the two extra years of schooling result in some extra knowledge being gained, otherwise I have to wonder about the quality of the education provided for those extra years.

Do they provide different care

Perhaps. Perhaps not. What does the research tell you? What is your opinion of the quality/validity of that research?

Do you think that it is right that hospitals will turn away Associate Degree Nurses just because they have an associate degree?

Nurses aren't being turned away because they have an Associate's degree, but because they don't have a Bachelor's degree. As others have already replied, it's not a question of fair or unfair. Any employer has a right to decide what education/qualifications they demand of individuals seeking employment in their organization.

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6 Posts; 307 Profile Views

I am doing my assignment correctly.

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macawake has 10 years experience.

1,101 Posts; 72,377 Profile Views

I am doing my assignment correctly.

What do your professors think that the value is of knowing what opinions electricians, plumbers, pilots, accountants, waitresses and software developers have on the subject of ADN vs BSN? I'm not trying to be snarky but for all you know, that is what we are. I question the usefulness of your assignment if this is truly what you're meant to do.

I happen to be a nurse, but I'm a Swedish nurse. We don't even have Associate's degrees in Nursing. Yet I answered your query ;)

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6 Posts; 307 Profile Views

I question the usefulness. I find it silly but its an assignment that I need to get done and this is a sight that she suggested. So just doing what I am told. Im just a student with no power over what my assignments are. Arguing is pointless with the instructor it just puts a target on the students back.

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6 Posts; 307 Profile Views

I have found that many peers have some of the same opinions as well. Many can't tell who has a BSN or an ASN . But coming from starting my experience I have taken the same amount of classes to get my ASN than a student getting a BSN. Actually many of the classes that I took at a University were easier than some of the classes that I took at a Community college. I think that it depends on the difficulty of the class and how it is taught. I think what is put on paper is a joke it shouldn't define how well you can be a nurse because its hard to say who really has more knowledge. That is why i brought up do you think its right hospitals have the right to turn away ASN degrees. But at the same time it is the hospitals choice and it makes the hospital look better gaining the highest status! Thank you for your input I appreciate it :)

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6 Posts; 307 Profile Views

Do you think there are less incidents with having BSN nurses at a hospital?

Thank you for your input I appreciate it! :)

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6 Posts; 307 Profile Views

Also what kind of degrees do you have in Sweeden? are they only BSN?

Thank you for your feedback i really appreciate it!

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llg has 42 years experience as a PhD, RN and specializes in Nursing Professional Development.

6 Followers; 13,213 Posts; 59,117 Profile Views

1. Yes. Assuming that they both attended good quality schools ... I often see a difference. The liberal arts component of the BSN programs gives many of the BSN's a broader and deeper understanding of the world around them, societal influences on health issues and practices, etc. The exact content of that additional education varies among individuals and programs, I can often spot it when you get to know a nurse well and and are open to seeing it. Some bring a strong foundation in the hard sciences, others in the social sciences, others in the humanities ... but most BSN graduates have some depth in fields outside of nursing that augments their basic introductory nursing courses. The BSN's also have had some addition education in research, statistics, evidence-based practice and nursing theory that helps them be more prepared to serve on project teams that aim to improve practice and involve reading, interpreting, and applying the academic literature.

2. As a previous poster said, employers are not rejecting candidates because they have an ADN ... they are rejecting them because they do not have the additional academic preparation of the BSN. 21st century health care is increasingly requiring the types of knowledge I mentioned above in #1. Nurses who don't have that knowledge are going to be a disadvantage in the workplace -- as employers will look to hire people who have the formal credentials that indicate that level of academic preparation. That could change if the economics/expectations would change. For example, a "lower level" of role could be created for the ADN's, or I guess I should say "re-created" as it used to be when RN's and LPN's worked together in teams in acute care. Then there would be jobs for nurses with both types of preparation -- but they wouldn't be the same job role.

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