Article by HuffPost: The Essential Items Nurses Always Keep In Their Bag

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by britk64 britk64 (New) New Student

MunoRN, RN

Specializes in Critical Care. Has 10 years experience. 8,009 Posts

No, not at all useful.  It's a revenue generating faux-article (ie clickbait).

Emergent, RN

Specializes in ER. Has 29 years experience. 2 Articles; 3,982 Posts

Huffpost? ?

britk64

britk64

2 Posts

I apologize, I just thought it was a fun read and wanted to share.

MunoRN, RN

Specializes in Critical Care. Has 10 years experience. 8,009 Posts

21 minutes ago, britk64 said:

I apologize, I just thought it was a fun read and wanted to share.

There no need to apologize, you didn't write the article, no harm in sharing it.

JKL33

6,204 Posts

It's pretty cringe.

But agree, no need to apologize. Not your fault someone had a slow day in the superficial-article-writing biz.

NRSKarenRN, BSN, RN

Specializes in Vents, Telemetry, Home Care, Home infusion. Has 45 years experience. 11 Articles; 17,290 Posts

I carry 90%  type of items recommended -- no glucose tabs, instead of claritin (which I take daily), carry benadryl for unexpected cat/dog dander exposure or food allergy. Sons tell me no one will steal handbag as too heavy--- well need change for parking  or Mickey D's ice tea.

?

 

JKL33

6,204 Posts

I have a few of the items. But really the essential things I carry "as a nurse" are my phone, my keys and my wallet.

The cringe I apparently honed in on were these:

Quote

“I can’t tell you how many situations I’ve been in where someone around me has felt faint or like they were going to pass out,” Parker said.

As a result, she now keeps a portable bottle of chewable glucose tablets on standby. “They bring the person’s sugar level up within minutes, as often low blood sugar can make someone feel faint," she said.

Quote

You never know when a headache, ache or pain will come on, which is why Melissa Batchelor, director of the Center for Aging, Health and Humanities at The George Washington University in Washington, D.C., stays stocked with Tylenol and Motrin.

Why both? “Older adults shouldn’t take NSAIDs, which is what Motrin is,” she said. Tylenol contains acetaminophen, which is safer for people with heart or kidney disease, high blood pressure or stomach problems.

Kind of makes it sound like "as a nurse" we run around treating randos on the street [because we know that if they feel faint it might be their lOw bLoOd SuGar so we whip out our glucose pills because we are so smart to know that]. ??

And we are also taking a full history on these random people we treat so we know if they need ibuprofen or acetaminophen.

?

Orca, ADN, ASN, RN

Specializes in Hospice, corrections, psychiatry, rehab, LTC. Has 27 years experience. 2,066 Posts

“I can’t tell you how many situations I’ve been in where someone around me has felt faint or like they were going to pass out,” Parker said.

I can't recall being in such a situation ever. I don't know where she hangs out, but we must know different people.

“Older adults shouldn’t take NSAIDs, which is what Motrin is,” she said. Tylenol contains acetaminophen, which is safer for people with heart or kidney disease, high blood pressure or stomach problems.

I don't recall seeing any age restriction on ibuprofen. If there is one, my physician certainly hasn't mentioned it (I'm in my mid-60s). Acetaminophen is also an NSAID, and it can fry your liver if taken to excess. I have also read studies that say that acetaminophen is no safer for people with cardiac issues than ibuprofen is. Seems that there are some half truths and misinformation in this article.