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ARNP or Administration?

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About to graduate May 5 (FNP program). Quick question: hypothetically speaking, if you had been an RN for 17 years, and now had your FNP degree which of these jobs would you choose? I am torn...well, blessed also! I have an NP job offer for after graduation, and an administrative job offer. I need to choose.

#1) NP job, cardiology, $78K, M-F 8-5, every 4th weekend, phone call, 2 weeks vacation, $1500 CME

#2) Director of a nursing unit (admin job), $85K, M-F 8:30 - 4:30, no weekends, no holidays, keep my current benefits (6 weeks vacation).

I have worked hard through school, I like the NP role, but I also need better flexible "family" hours. The NP job would get my foot into the field. The admin role opens a whole other door, and is more flexible with it's hours.

If you were to look back at yourself starting out, and this opportunity came up which would you choose? Just looking for some advice. So happy to be done with school!!

PS: I live in Florida

gwapo

Specializes in ICU. Has 7 years experience.

About to graduate May 5 (FNP program). Quick question: hypothetically speaking, if you had been an RN for 17 years, and now had your FNP degree which of these jobs would you choose? I am torn...well, blessed also! I have an NP job offer for after graduation, and an administrative job offer. I need to choose.

#1) NP job, cardiology, $78K, M-F 8-5, every 4th weekend, phone call, 2 weeks vacation, $1500 CME

#2) Director of a nursing unit (admin job), $85K, M-F 8:30 - 4:30, no weekends, no holidays, keep my current benefits (6 weeks vacation).

I have worked hard through school, I like the NP role, but I also need better flexible "family" hours. The NP job would get my foot into the field. The admin role opens a whole other door, and is more flexible with it's hours.

If you were to look back at yourself starting out, and this opportunity came up which would you choose? Just looking for some advice. So happy to be done with school!!

PS: I live in Florida

If i was in your place, i will take the FNP job. I mean that is why i went to school, to be an fnp. Plus cardiology is my favorite so that seals the deal. I used to work in florida, i went through 4 different managers in 2 years. One was the manager for more than 15 years, she quit and went back to bedside nursing.. Iv heard from a few managers saying it is not the best time to be in management right now... But it is your decision, go wherever it will make you happy. Good luck!

Definately the NP job IMO. My friend is an administrator of a hospital nursing unit and guess what she's doing? She's in NP school right along with me. Use the skills and knowledge you worked so hard (and paid!) for.

Wow, I don't know if I could pass up more $$$, 3x more time off, and less hours!! I really like both NP and admin, so I might lean toward the benefits, if it was me. However, you have to think about what "job" you would prefer to be doing day in and day out. Would you rather deal with patients or employees? Would you like diagnosing cardiac disease, or budgets? The positions are so different from each other, it really comes down to what your preferences are to the jobs themselves.

MC1906

Specializes in Critical Care & ENT. Has 10 years experience.

Congrats, congrats, congrats! I would go for the NP job. I would look at the NP job as $79,500 (add in the CME). The NP job does have less vacation time and a little less money. But I think with the Director job, you will have to be "Available" 24/7. I don't know any administrator/director that works "set" hours. Speak to current directors and see if they can provide you with additional insight on working as a director, working at that level in your company, and how is it working for your Senior Admin team...especially the CNO.

The NP experience can lead to more NP jobs and even Admin jobs in the future. The Admin job will not necessarily lead to more NP jobs. You will not be gaining the NP experience, which is becoming competitive to find a job nowadays. I'm sure you'll make the best decision once you have all the information you need.

Where in Florida are you located? What school did you grad from?

CCRNDiva, BSN, RN

Specializes in Level II Trauma Center ICU. Has 7 years experience.

First of all, congratulations!!

I would take the NP job. On the surface, the management position may look like less hours, but as another poster mentioned, director positions are rarely 8-5. A unit director is responsible for the unit 24/7. Every concern of the unit will be your concern, from staffing, meeting the budget to dealing with squabbles among staff. I would take the opportunity to secure a position in the field you've worked so hard to enter. The NP position could open more doors for you and lead to more pay and flexibility in practice.

It is up to you and what your career goals are. But in the end, I bet you chose the FNP route over pursuing a masters in administration for a reason. Good luck!

That was my question i just posted at this site.. debating whether to continue my dual MBA/Healthcare administration or FNP. I like what "MC1906" said earleir."The NP experience can lead to more NP jobs and even Admin jobs in the future. The Admin job will not necessarily lead to more NP jobs" i think that is so TRUEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEE... NP jobs will leads to NP positions and admins job but admin jobs will not lead to NP jobs.. so y not go for the one that is more secure and u can travel anywhere still working with your NP licence. while in admin job, it is sooooo competitive and cant be easily transferable...I also have make up my decision, NP is what I will go for... as much as i hate the bedside nursing at least, I will have the secure career to fall back on and to get a healthcare administration degree post masters is less than 1 yr online.. so y not go for FNP.

Bringing this topic up. I am in the same situation and chose director of nursing position. Did not want the opportunity to pass since it may never come back. Just wondering what you decided to do when u were making this decision and are you glad about it.

Depending on where you work, administration can be good mobility moving up.

BostonFNP, APRN

Specializes in Adult Internal Medicine. Has 9 years experience.

To be honest, you want to negotiate a better deal for the NP job. The money is low, the call is high, and the vacation and CME are low average assuming you also get a week for CME.

NP job for sure! Your are 27/7 as a director. Problems, blame and dealing with drama from employees, physicians and admin. No brainer NP for a better life.

TAKE THE ADMINISTRATION POSITION! Not only do you have better benefits, but you also have better long term potential. You can work towards assistant CNO and CNO. These are very high paying jobs that will far surpass what any practitioner will make. Also, they will churn out more and more practitioners, but management requires a personality to accompany the education. Not just anyone can do it. You got your NSNP to make more money. Let's face it.In the mean time, another door opened. Walk through it.

Riburn3

Specializes in Internal Medicine. Has 10 years experience.

To be honest, you want to negotiate a better deal for the NP job. The money is low, the call is high, and the vacation and CME are low average assuming you also get a week for CME.

This thread is almost 5 years old...and was over 4 years old when you replied. Hard to have a hand on the pulse of the NP job market in Florida in 2012, especially seeing as how in 2017 we still see people posting similar NP salaries in Florida.

That said, I'm curious what the OP ended up doing. Having been a manager of a CVICU, I can say my life is a million times better as an APRN than it ever was working in administration for a hospital. More autonomy and way WAAAY less BS. Weekly or daily meetings about patient satisfaction scores are behind me, and I couldn't be happier. Both jobs can be stressful, but I feel like the stress of being an NP has more gravity, where the stress of a director is more serious and ridiculous. I say a director get threatened with his job because his units pain satisfaction score wasn't high enough.

BirkieGirl

Has 25 years experience.

I would also lean toward the NP position. I work on the administrative side of things, and trust me that we likely never work a true 40 hour week. Yes, that's what the contract is, but we work until the work is done. We are also responsible for kicking in when staffing is short or there are multiple call ins. I'm getting my MSN next month and will be starting NP school too, even with the great role that I have. I'm also curious what the OP ended up doing!

I'g glad to see this thread is still going. I have considered both FNP and MSN in Administration. However, I would not want to do nursing administration in a 24/7 setting. Rather, I would look for a job in ambulatory care. The hours are great and the pay is good. I guess your really do have to decide if you want to work with patients or employees and budgets.