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Are Students Protesting HESI??

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Hello,everyone. I was told by a classmate that she head that there is a website that was started by a nursing instructor. I guess the website is looking for those nursing students who completed their nursing program and were never told from the beginning about the HESI exam.

Rumors has it that this website has these students setting up a protest date, time, and place.

I really would like for anyone to let me know if they know the website or where and when they will be rallying. I would like to join in the protest.

Its about time that schools stop abusing these students because of HESI. Its about helping the students. HESI is only a probability exam.

Please let me know if anyone finds anything

TX_nurse_08

Has 8 years experience.

Wow, I have not heard anything about that. I'm not quite sure what you mean about schools not telling students about the HESI exam though. Were they not told that it would be given or is there something else they are protesting here? I just graduated from a 2 year program and we took a HESI after each course, and one at the end of the program. At any rate, good luck to whoever is having problems with it. :-)

I have been trying to find out more information about it. I guess the website was started by a nursing instructor whose program utilized the exam without early notification to her students.

Which is what happened to my classmates and I.

97% of my classmates completed the program but did not pass HESI and do not have their degrees.

This is so wrong. If they completed the program let NCLEX determine their competency not HESI. HESI only indicates probabilty of NCLEX.

tartay0211RN

Specializes in Pediatrics.

I also graduated from a nursing program that did not inform us about the HESI requirement prior to admission. We were originally told in our first semester that in the second semester we would start taking HESI and that we were going to be the "test" class to see how it goes. Well the next semester came around and they chaged it so that the HESI tests would count as our final exam. In out last semester we were told we would take the cumulative exam to see how we did, and then they changed that on us and didnt let anyone graduate that had not passed it. I know this affected several people and to top it all off they gave us the HESI review class AFTER we had already take the test! I am told from students now that it is listed as a school requirement and they know going in so that seems a little more fair. My class was really bitter about it and it causes us alot of problems with the instructors as well as the added cost that we didnt know about going in. I think the test was a good helping tool for studying purposes and how to answer correctly but I dont think the content is what helped me pass the NCLEX. Let me know if you hear anything about the protest.:banghead:

futurecnm

Specializes in ED.

Hello,everyone. I was told by a classmate that she head that there is a website that was started by a nursing instructor. I guess the website is looking for those nursing students who completed their nursing program and were never told from the beginning about the HESI exam.

Rumors has it that this website has these students setting up a protest date, time, and place.

I really would like for anyone to let me know if they know the website or where and when they will be rallying. I would like to join in the protest.

Its about time that schools stop abusing these students because of HESI. Its about helping the students. HESI is only a probability exam.

Please let me know if anyone finds anything

Would knowing about a HESI exam stop people from going into nursing school? I don't get it? Would it have changed anything? We took a HESI a couple times each year however, ours were not used towards our grades. But it was on our schedule. I do think it is kind of harsh to fail people due to this exam. However, it is a good indicator of NCLEX success and school's need to keep their NCLEX pass rates up. The HESI really wasn't that bad of a test, I didn't think.

The Hesi wouldn't be so bad of a test if you had acquired a good program. Meaning good instructors, appropriate tools, and most of all notified of it in a timely manner. Our school failed in all aspects of all of the above. We were never familiarize with any sort of computer exams, nor were we ever told of any areas of weakness. I don't mind taking any exam, as long as I get heads up first. But I was definetly freaked out by being told less than two months before graduation and than telling me if I don't pass it I can sit for boards. Give me the opportunity to practice for goodness sakes. If my instructors didn't have much information about it, how may to? Now, 97% of my classmates can't sit for boards, no degrees, can't even get back into the program or any other program. FOUR years- gone.

Jolie, BSN

Specializes in Maternal - Child Health. Has 34 years experience.

Would knowing about a HESI exam stop people from going into nursing school? I don't get it? Would it have changed anything? We took a HESI a couple times each year however, ours were not used towards our grades. But it was on our schedule. I do think it is kind of harsh to fail people due to this exam. However, it is a good indicator of NCLEX success and school's need to keep their NCLEX pass rates up. The HESI really wasn't that bad of a test, I didn't think.

A HESI requirement may impact a candidate's choice of nursing education programs. If you were deciding between 2 schools, one which would allow you to graduate and sit for NCLEX regardless of HESI scores, and one which would hold your degree and NCLEX eligibility hostage for lack of passing HESI on 2 or 3 tries, which would you choose?

While I disagree with the concept of "exit" exams, it is one thing when a school makes that policy known upfront. But we have seen numerous threads from students who were made aware of HESI requirements only after they completed a significant portion of their nursing education program. That is wrong. A college catalog constitutes a contract between a school and a student, and any unilateral change in that contract is unacceptable.

Let me turn your question about. Would you take a job where your employer could unilaterally change your salary mid-pay period without notice? Would you take lease that allowed the landlord to unilaterally raise the rent in the middle of the month? I didn't think so.

The developers of HESI have stated that many nursing education programs use the test for purposes other than those intended by the developers. If a candidate has passed both the theory and clinical portions of a nursing program, it is wrong to withhold his/her degree and NCLEX eligibility (livelihood) over a test administered solely to improve a school's NCLEX pass rate. If a school is having pass rate problems, it is their responsibility to ID and fix them without artificially holding back legitimate graduates. There is no state in the U.S. that requires a passing HESI score in order to sit for NCLEX. NCLEX is the recognized national standard for licensure, not HESI or any other exit exam

THANK YOU JOLIE!!!!

Your writing is so eloquent. Thats EXACTLY IT!!!

Thank goodness!

futurecnm

Specializes in ED.

A HESI requirement may impact a candidate's choice of nursing education programs. If you were deciding between 2 schools, one which would allow you to graduate and sit for NCLEX regardless of HESI scores, and one which would hold your degree and NCLEX eligibility hostage for lack of passing HESI on 2 or 3 tries, which would you choose?

While I disagree with the concept of "exit" exams, it is one thing when a school makes that policy known upfront. But we have seen numerous threads from students who were made aware of HESI requirements only after they completed a significant portion of their nursing education program. That is wrong. A college catalog constitutes a contract between a school and a student, and any unilateral change in that contract is unacceptable.

Let me turn your question about. Would you take a job where your employer could unilaterally change your salary mid-pay period without notice? Would you take lease that allowed the landlord to unilaterally raise the rent in the middle of the month? I didn't think so.

The developers of HESI have stated that many nursing education programs use the test for purposes other than those intended by the developers. If a candidate has passed both the theory and clinical portions of a nursing program, it is wrong to withhold his/her degree and NCLEX eligibility (livelihood) over a test administered solely to improve a school's NCLEX pass rate. If a school is having pass rate problems, it is their responsibility to ID and fix them without artificially holding back legitimate graduates. There is no state in the U.S. that requires a passing HESI score in order to sit for NCLEX. NCLEX is the recognized national standard for licensure, not HESI or any other exit exam

I do not agree with schools that do not allow people to pass due to HESI results (like someone else said, if you have a good program you should have no problem passing HESI). However, you are saying the school should disclose everything they are going to require to all students. so, they should tell you about all the clinical requirements, what will be on every test, what they are lecturing on, etc etc. I don't think that it is similar to an employer changing a salary. No one really knows exactly what to expect when entering nursing school. If someone would have told me I have to pass a HESI test to graduate I would have had no idea what it was and could have cared less at that time (as graduation seemed SO far off). It would have meant nothing to me. I'm not sure what schools are trying to get out of using the HESI as a graduation requiremenet and would be interested in hearing from any faculty to find out. It must benefit them somehow. It seems to me that it would hurt their reputation if they are not passing so many students and they tell incoming students to stay away. It goes against the usual desire to bring in as many students as possible. So, if I student does not pass in the permitted number of time to take HESI, do they just not graduate and that is it? they have no opportunity to get the degree? Take the semester over? What are the options? Just curious.

Here is the option for us. If we don't pass Hesi by 90% or greater we do not sit for boards, we do not get our degree. We get nothing. Absolutely nothing.

Some nursing programs who use Hesi as an exit, use it to determine their students areas of weakness and create a plan for them such as taking the Kaplan review course or doing 12000 questions etc. But they don't penalize the students. They help their students succeed. Remember this HESI is a probability exam, its not the NCLEX.

But ours and most programs do nothing of the sort. My classmates are left with a college transcription with 100 or more accumulated college credit and no degree. They are unable to attend another nursing program anywhere else.

Yea, my school post last week that they have 100% NCLEX pass rate. Why? Because one of my classmates, by the way she was the only one thus far who took the NCLEX exam, and passed. There are only three of us who passed HESI. Crazy, huh?

So if you are student looking from the outside, you would say "wow, 100% pass rate, how awesome is that?" Not knowing that 97% percent didn't pass the exit exam nor that 100% meant one person.

They trick the consumer and BON.

Again, if you don't know how do you know what to ask when looking for a program.

NeoNurseTX, RN

Specializes in NICU Level III.

We weren't told either... we had to pass to take boards.. and they didn't tell us till our 2nd to last semester.

I almost lost a classmate this past week. This crisis has been so traumatic for me and my classmates. We are all very close. Anyway, I found the website its on facebook. I think you need to be validated to get in it. Not sure.

Its not HESI itself that I blame. It is the school who has not fully utilized HESI as a whole. I feel that the program should have measured the students areas of weakness from the beginning, middle and end. I feel that HESI should have been incorporated in the program. I also feel that the school should have told the students in a timely manner. Most of all, I feel the students should have the degrees they have worked hard for not be punished based on proability exam. This exam accounts for the probability of whether or not you will pass NCLEX the first time but its also accounts for the nursing curriculum.

Good Luck to the rest of you. I hope you fight for the right to get your degrees and sit for boards. This is all for the students who were not told in a timely manner, and or lack preparation and or whose school punishes them for not being successful using a probability exam. Help the students strengthen their abilities to test for HESI so that they can pass NCLEX the first time. Don't just throw them away like garbage. My classmates and other students have families...children.

The Hesi is used for the school's accreditation. That's what our meds pub review lady told us and she shared her opinion that the proof of what we learned should be seen in the fact that we graduated - not necessarily a Hesi test. It does not benefit the student. In fact, we were told we couldn't get cleared from the school to take the nclex until we got a 900. Some people will never get that and they are already lowering the standard and letting people stop taking it. I passed with a 942. It was given in winter quarter during critical care and I got an 804. Then you pay $35 thereafter. Everyone wishes it was given after all our quarters of school. They told us that they only expected 10% to pass the first time. So,the question of money for subsequent tests is obvious. One good thing is that is kicks your butt into gear asap to study, study, study. For that, I am glad. I originally approached it as a litmus test for nclex but this woman said they were two totally different tests - Hesi is pickier, more micromanaging, more college textbook stuff and NCLEX is "the big picture".

The Hesi didn't appear to be a concise logic. For example, in our meds pub review we were told to use certain approaches. These work in Mosby's, for example, but they don't work for many of the Hesi questions. The only thing I can recommend to people is to study as many questions as possible in another book, study the book - line by line, memorize the questions on the cd because some of those may show up (as do some repeat questions from the first test) and just think about what the question is that's being asked. I can't site examples because I agreed to a confidentiality agreement. But I think what helped me was doing over 3,000 Mosby's questions and just going over the Hesi book repeatedly, word for word. The practice questions develop a "sense" of things - you're more likely to make an educated guess.

Our reviewer for meds pub, the one I told you writes questions for the boards, didn't have much positive feedback for Hesi. She said it would confuse us. She said it's pickier than the Boards - more a reflection of what you can prove you learned in college. Whereas, the boards are more global, the "big picture" as she put it. Again, it's for college accreditation.

Good practice though! Do 100 questions a day for at least 30 days before the test. One thing they should be doing differently is preparing students at least 6 weeks in advance on how to prepare for these tests.

The passing score for Hesi is on average, 800-850 across the country per the meds pub review lady. The Hesi says 850 is the standard they push. The school can choose another number. UC sets the magic number at 900.

If we only had to score and 800 or 850, many more would have passed.

So, when you hear people say the Hesi was so 'easy', make sure you ask what was required of them. It's a difficult test but not undoable. Just keep practicing. I worked very hard to get my 942. Very hard. If I only needed an 800, I had that back in February before I even finished Critical Care with little effort. To get that 942 mark, I studied a lot more.

One thing, because some of the questions seem poor in terms of logic, it's easy to over-read into the easier ones. I caught myself thinking, "this is too easy" but went with the sense of what the answer was. There is a mix of common sense and oddly-logiced questions that still don't make sense to me.;)

In response to the person who wrote about the likelihood of passing nclex based on Hesi - that's what's on the web - but the woman who gave us our Meds Publishing review (and writes questions for the boards) said that is simply not true. She said, repeatedly, they are two totally different tests. That said, everyone that I know who passed hesi has passed nclex but some really struggled and answered the average number of questions (120).

Again, Hesi is reported by her to be pickier, and the NCLEX is supposed to be "big picture".

I will definately let you know - I'm waiting on a NCLEX test date. Here's another random hint she told us. When you memorize the Digoxin toxicity - early vs late - group it into GI and Neuro. GI is early - nausea, vomiting, loss of appetite; Neuro is later - green, yellow halos. For CHF - remember the 3 D's - Diet, Diuretic, Digoxin Digoxin -think 60,80, 100. These are pulses. Right? Check apical pulse for 1 full minute and hold if below 60 for adult, below 80 for school age child and below 100 for baby. In school, we were only told the 60. This was helpful for us! And know the dig lab range. She said that Glascow is not on boards per say - just to know that 15 is perfect and below 7 is coma I believe. That was it. Save temperature for last on vital signs for infants - she said that's big on boards. On central line, always end with heparin. She gave us something on "SASH" - saline flush, aspirate or antibiotic, saline, heparin. I just used this on a test I took and it worked. Only once choice gave heparin.

Hope this helps.

futurecnm

Specializes in ED.

In response to the person who wrote about the likelihood of passing nclex based on Hesi - that's what's on the web - but the woman who gave us our Meds Publishing review (and writes questions for the boards) said that is simply not true. She said, repeatedly, they are two totally different tests. That said, everyone that I know who passed hesi has passed nclex but some really struggled and answered the average number of questions (120).

Again, Hesi is reported by her to be pickier, and the NCLEX is supposed to be "big picture".

I will definately let you know - I'm waiting on a NCLEX test date. Here's another random hint she told us. When you memorize the Digoxin toxicity - early vs late - group it into GI and Neuro. GI is early - nausea, vomiting, loss of appetite; Neuro is later - green, yellow halos. For CHF - remember the 3 D's - Diet, Diuretic, Digoxin Digoxin -think 60,80, 100. These are pulses. Right? Check apical pulse for 1 full minute and hold if below 60 for adult, below 80 for school age child and below 100 for baby. In school, we were only told the 60. This was helpful for us! And know the dig lab range. She said that Glascow is not on boards per say - just to know that 15 is perfect and below 7 is coma I believe. That was it. Save temperature for last on vital signs for infants - she said that's big on boards. On central line, always end with heparin. She gave us something on "SASH" - saline flush, aspirate or antibiotic, saline, heparin. I just used this on a test I took and it worked. Only once choice gave heparin.

Hope this helps.

I have taken HESI exams throughout school and NCLEX last month. NCLEX was definately NOT easier at all. I passed both and did not find one more "big picture" than the other. NCLEX also asks some very specific questions. They are not all general. And I think HESI was very helpful as far as what a student's strong points are and where to study. All these schools would not be using HESI if it were not helpful in some way (or required).

I'm envious that schools actually test students with hesi throughout. We got it at the end with little "big picture" preparation.

I will give an honest assessment when i take the NCLEX. But, that is what we were told and the lady who told us writes questions for the boards so I will judge it when I take it. That is what we were told.

I have heard of school saying that students get 2 tries and that's it but I imagine they'd be up for a lawsuit. I think the bark is sometimes worse than the bite. UC, for example, says you have to get a 900 to pass but already people gettign 866 or somewhere in that range are getting emails saying they're passed through. It appears that the higher the numbers are, the better the school looks as well as higher numbers for nclex.

If i don't pass nclex after scoring a 942 on Hesi - there will be some serious advertising of that fact!!!!!!!! Luckily, I have a job waiting across the river in Kentucky and there isn't much pressure per say. Some people, however, have pressure from their jobs to get it passed and get going. That is hard, very hard.

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