Jump to content

Are the RN-BSN programs less competitive to get into?

Posted
by ns808 ns808 Member

Hi everyone! So I was wondering if the RN (associates)-BSN programs are easier to get into than going straight into a BSN program? I know that CSULA has a RN-BSN program and I was wondering what they look at for acceptance? Do they check the pre-req grades or the grades you received in RN school?

RunBabyRN

Specializes in L&D, infusion, urology. Has 2 years experience.

Different programs look at different things. You need to look at their criteria.

Post-licensure programs are pretty impacted, too, but I can't speak to the comparison.

Do your best to keep ALL grades as high as possible.

Miss.LeoRN

Specializes in Cardiac Stepdown, PCU.

All programs are different, but the ones near me do not have a rigorous admission process. You simply enroll into the program after applying to the college hosting the program. As long as you meet the requirements (rn liscense, credits from adn approved) you're good.

TheCommuter, BSN, RN

Specializes in Case mgmt., rehab, (CRRN), LTC & psych. Has 15 years experience.

Do they check the pre-req grades or the grades you received in RN school?

RN-to-BSN degree completion programs are extremely common and, frankly, a dime a dozen in the US. Since the schools want your tuition dollars more than anything, acceptance into these programs tends to be swift, painless and streamlined.

You have a 2.5 GPA? No problem! I can think of at least 100+ online RN-to-BSN programs that will accept candidates with low GPAs.

You have not completed all of the prerequisite courses required by our school of nursing? No problem! I can think of multiple online RN-to-BSN programs that will grant provisional acceptance to candidates who have not completed all of their prerequisite courses.

You attended an unaccredited ASN or diploma nursing program? No problem! I can think of multiple online RN-to-BSN programs that automatically grant 90+ credits off the top for possessing RN licensure to get around their policies of not accepting transfer credits earned at unaccredited schools. By granting 90 credits, the student only has to earn another 30 credits to receive the exalted BSN degree.

In a nutshell, the RN-to-BSN degree machine is big business in the realm of US higher education. Anyone with an RN license and a diploma or ASN can find multiple online schools that will grant unconditional acceptance.

RN-to-BSN degree completion programs are extremely common and, frankly, a dime a dozen in the US. Since the schools want your tuition dollars more than anything, acceptance into these programs tends to be swift, painless and streamlined.

You have a 2.5 GPA? No problem! I can think of at least 100+ online RN-to-BSN programs that will accept candidates with low GPAs.

You have not completed all of the prerequisite courses required by our school of nursing? No problem! I can think of multiple online RN-to-BSN programs that will grant provisional acceptance to candidates who have not completed all of their prerequisite courses.

You attended an unaccredited ASN or diploma nursing program? No problem! I can think of multiple online RN-to-BSN programs that automatically grant 90+ credits off the top for possessing RN licensure to get around their policies of not accepting transfer credits earned at unaccredited schools. By granting 90 credits, the student only has to earn another 30 credits to receive the exalted BSN degree.

In a nutshell, the RN-to-BSN degree machine is big business in the realm of US higher education. Anyone with an RN license and a diploma or ASN can find multiple online schools that will grant unconditional acceptance.

But are they accredited. That's the important part. If you wish to seek an MSN your regionally accredited school credit must transfer over.

Sent from my iPhone using allnurses

Numbers will vary from school to school, but in general there are many more people applying for pre-licensure programs (those training you to become a RN) than for RN-BSN programs. The pre-licensure programs are also more resource intensive (requiring clinicals) than the RN-BSN programs which generally do not have clinical content.

At my University, we had over 850 applications to enter the BSN program for this fall (for less than 90 spaces). This included both first-year and transfer applications. We had approximately 70 applications for the RN-BSN program (for 40 spaces).