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Are we really preparing ourselves?

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My couselers at my cc encourage all the pre nursing students to take one science course at a time and to slowly do the pre reqs. Now, do you really think this is good advice? I hear all the time students going into the nursing program and dropping out because it was completly overwhelming. Ive seen the question come up about taking micro and physio together. I would be interested in seeing how the adjustment is for a nursing student who had taken one or two classes at a time.

I talked to my teacher who graduated from Stanford.She said that most the students at our cc are being hand held.

My question is,what is the best way to prepare for nursing school?

The argument has been brought up that you should get your foundation slowly.Well,what Ive heard nursing school trucks along pretty quick.

I would like to hear from nursing students too.If nursing school is so much more intense than prereqs,shouldnt we gear up before?

Just wondering

That's a good question. I've been taking my prereqs 2 classes at a time, mainly because so many of them have the previous class as a prerequisite. You can't exactly take the entire A&P sequence in one term. Nor the chemistry sequence. And at my school, A&P I and II were prereqs for Micro. So I'm taking what I can as quickly as I can, but it takes awhile and I don't need to fill in with any general ed classes since I have a prior degree.

I had an interview for the Clinical Laboratory Science program a couple of days ago, and they expressed concern if I would be able to handle the courseload (which is typically 17-18 credit hours per term) because I've only been taking about 10 credit hours per term. How does one answer that? :stone

S.N. Visit, BSN, RN

Specializes in Home Health Care. Has 8 years experience.

I'm one of the one's who took the science co-reqs one at a time, so I could do my very best to get accepted into the nursing program, and not take away from my family time. With stiff competition, getting "A"'s was the best thing I could have done for myself.

The other classes like psych, writing, sociology ect, I took a minumum of 3 classes together each term.

Most of the students who are a year ahead of me, all say the same thing..."get as many classes done and out of the way as soon as you can, before starting the program!"

Since I have half my credits done already, my load will remain the same or be a lot less (depending on the term)in the nursing program . ( no more than 7 credits of strictly nursing courses a term for me )

I don't think the college is holding my hand or spoon feeding me by giving me the option to get all the general classes done early, but they are weeding out others who won't be able to handle the stress of 15 credits a term.

For people who can get half their co-reqs done and want only the nursing classes to deal with, this option works well.

LeesieBug

Specializes in ER.

I think it all depends on the student. I had a goal ....to get through pre-reqs in a year, so I could apply to the college of nursing. So, I took what I needed, and slammed it all out in 2 semesters. It worked out well for me, just diving in. When I entered the nursing program, I was already used to a very rigorous schedule. In addition, I had built my confidence up to the point that I knew I could handle whatever they threw at me.

Now, It also depends on how much you have going on. I am a stay home mom of three school age kids. I do not work outside the home. Holding a job on top of everything else, I don't think I could have handled 15-17 credit hours and multiple science classes in the same semester.

I say if you have the time to devote to the class work, and the determination to get it done, try it out. The worst case scenario is that you realize it is too much, and know to slow things down.

If you are in no hurry, and have other obligations, take your time....the people I know who took 6 credits at a time adjusted to nursing school just about well as those who took 15.

I feel that it is a very individual decision, and that's what conselors should focus on...not telling eveyone that walks in the door to take it slow.

Fun2, BSN, RN

Specializes in Operating Room.

I have already completed all the prereqs, but due to B's or the over 5 year rule, I have to do them again.

I plan on keeping my B in College Algebra, if I can get into the Nursing program without having to retake it.

So, for my retakes, I am taking them one at a time. I took them all together pretty much the first time around, and did not make A's. Therefore, I am concentrating on one at a time, striving for that needed A!!!

I plan on doing A&P II in summer I, and Micro in summer II. That way, before I start the nursing program, hopefully in January of '06, I will have all my "regular" classes out of the way. Then, I can devote my time toward nursing courses, and clinicals.

I really think it depends on each individual. If you are a straight A student, took all honors, GT, or accelerated classes in high school, then taking more than one at a time may be ok for you. Myself, I was an average B student, and it continued in my college courses.

Now, since returning off and on to college since 2002, I am making mostly A's, but still made B's in the 3 spanish courses I took. :rolleyes:

Good luck!! :)

stressgal, RN

Specializes in CCRN.

I will be starting quarter 3 of seven in an ADN program. I was able to complete all of my pre and most co-reqs prior to starting the nursing courses. I had an advisor who questioned me taking Psychology and Anatomy and Physiology II at the same time. I assured him I felt up to it and would pull back if it was too much. It wasn't. I received A's in both classes, as well as a communications class, and put most of my time in A&P. It just depends on the type of student you are. I have focused full time on school for the last year. With that said, I do not believe that general and science courses can be compared to nursing courses. First, there are many more contact hours involved. You will spend many hours outside of class practicing skills and writing care plans. Second, the way you are tested in nursing classes is entirely different than the other courses. It includes much more critical thinking, many times with several right answers per question but only one correct answer. Next, the reading and comprehension are much more demanding than other courses. Finally you have the grading scale. At my CC you must receive and 80% in the nursing courses to continue as opposed to 70% in the other courses. Many times those courses will become a stumbling block to nursing students as they are so focused on the nursing classes. I believe that colleges encouraging you to complete as many pre and co-reqs prior to entry into the program are helping ensure your success.

Good luck!

You hit the nail on the head!Confidence is what guides me in school.Im a mom of three(4,8 & 10)I hold a 3.9 GPA.(no outside job..My youngest is at the preschool on campus.I devote m-th 9am-3pm to study come home,cook dinner spend time with the kids ,tuck them in at 9.Then I study till Midnight.I always have a white board with a priority list of to dos.

I hear so many times how nursing school hits people like a brick wall.I want to be as prepared as I can be.

Now,does school come easy to me?I dont know if it comes easy,but I have such confidence in what my goals are.I see so many students in my classes saying,"ohh, I cant do this,this is going to kill me" I kept a positive attitude that I WAS going to do this and know it.I found what works for me and did it.

I made a "C" in A&P I and then made a "B" in A&P II. Then turned around and got a "C" in microbiology. ive yet to take chemistry and a required intro to nursing practice, both of which i hear are difficult classes. Does anybody think I am on the right path? Should I continue with such mediocre grades? All I have to bank on is that I am a male student hoping to get in b/c of that, but I have also learned a lot. Must one have all "A's" to get into nursing??????

Fun2, BSN, RN

Specializes in Operating Room.

I made a "C" in A&P I and then made a "B" in A&P II. Then turned around and got a "C" in microbiology. ive yet to take chemistry and a required intro to nursing practice, both of which i hear are difficult classes. Does anybody think I am on the right path? Should I continue with such mediocre grades? All I have to bank on is that I am a male student hoping to get in b/c of that, but I have also learned a lot. Must one have all "A's" to get into nursing??????

I've read there are many "C" students that are great nurses. As for "getting in to the program" it all depends on the program you are trying to enter.

My ADN program I am trying for requires a C on all prereqs, but it goes by rank, therefore they are at 3.77 GPA. (only one class can you get a B, A&P must be an A) I've heard that some BSN programs are easier to get into.

Good luck! :)

i just finished all of my pre-req's in 2 semesters and can not imagine taking one class at a time. our pre-req's amounted to a total of 35 semester hours. taking one class at a time would have taken some doing to complete that many hours.

it is hard to suggest what you should do but as part of your nurses training, look at visiting with your adviser as learning assessment skills and start asking questions and lots of them. i must admit i am quite surprised at an adviser that would advise anyone to take one class at a time. for me this would send a red flag up so quickly... i would also perhaps ask the nursing department what they generally recommend. it doesn't hurt to ask and it sends a message to the nursing department that you are someone who is very interested in your academic career. it also doesn't hurt to ask for a different adviser if one is available. ask other folks in your classes what they did and you might be surprised. you might also ask any of the current nursing students how they did it and if given the opportunity what would they have done differently. you really need to be your own advocate. advisors can only advise and some are better then others.

it is true that getting into nursing school is incredibly competitive. "a's" are very important but a mixture of "a's" and "b's" is probably more realistic for most people. double check with the nursing department to find out if they use a different gpa point system then the traditional gpa scale. also find out if you are penalized for repeating courses. some schools have implemented this as a way of weeding out the "c" folks. then there is the matter of taking so long to do your classes and retaining the information. if it takes you three years to finish up your pre-req's it probably could be said that the information you retained from that first semester three years ago is close to 'nil and every class that builds upon an earlier class will be a struggle because you have to go back and look stuff up.

good luck and remember...you are your own best advocate.

agent

Has 5 years experience.

This is going to sound very arrogant so plz read between the lines.

I work full-time at a managerial level position (more hours) for a large software company. I also have a 3yr old boy and a 20 month old boy.

I am taking classes at DePaul to finish my BA while I do nursing.

I recently took A&P at a local cc where they have a nursing program. They did not go into detail for a lot of the concept and overall I thouhgt it was very managable to get a A, which I did.

To my concern was that nearly 3/4 of the class had a VERY hard time and got C's and D's on nearly every test. I'm not sure if its just my school, or the pool of candidates that are applying to be student nurses, but I feel they dumbed it down for everyone and therefore I don't feel as well prepared.

Fun2, BSN, RN

Specializes in Operating Room.

This is going to sound very arrogant so plz read between the lines.

I work full-time at a managerial level position (more hours) for a large software company. I also have a 3yr old boy and a 20 month old boy.

I am taking classes at DePaul to finish my BA while I do nursing.

I recently took A&P at a local cc where they have a nursing program. They did not go into detail for a lot of the concept and overall I thouhgt it was very managable to get a A, which I did.

To my concern was that nearly 3/4 of the class had a VERY hard time and got C's and D's on nearly every test. I'm not sure if its just my school, or the pool of candidates that are applying to be student nurses, but I feel they dumbed it down for everyone and therefore I don't feel as well prepared.

I know I didn't take my A&P class seriously, so I didn't do very well. I know this because I am reviewing the material now, and there is a bunch I remember. So, I know it wasn't because I was just plain stupid, I just didn't stuy enough, or the correct way for the lecture tests, or lab practicals.

Now, I am older, more mature, and don't have a baby to deal with. (I may have to lock hubby and our two daughters out of my room, though.) :rolleyes:

I really think that maturity has much to do with how well one can do in many college level courses. So, come January 18th, I'll be taking A&P 1 over again. I WILL get an A this time!! :)